Author: abramicus

CHNESE BALLONIST'S FAILURE TO REACH DIAOYUDAO REQUIRES REFLECTION [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-1-3 13:23:41 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2014-1-3 13:34

TAIWAN COAST GUARD DENIES INFORMING JAPAN ABOUT CALL FOR HELP FROM BALLOONIST

Faced with the claim by the Japanese Coast Guard that it was alerted to the call for help from the balloonist by the Taiwan Coast Guard, the latter has entered for the record its position that it never contacted Japan about the distress call and never asked Japan for help.  Instead, it simply sent out its own ship, which however failed to find the balloonist (despite his huge balloon not being completely deflated).  

Now, if Japan lied about getting a call from the Taiwan Coast Guard to look for the balloonist, then there is a valid ground to suspect that it was behind a failed false flag operation of its own making - a point important to bring up and enter into the historical record, because the actual end result of the "heroic" balloon trip to Diaoyudao was nothing short of disastrous for China's claim of having administrative control and sovereignty over Diaoyudao, in that the balloonist was saved not by the Mainland Chinese nor by the Taiwanese Coast Guards, but by the Japanese Coast Guard, whose act of turning over the balloonist to the Chinese Coast Guard becomes evidence that it was Japan, not China, that had real control over Diaoyudao.  Now, how can a hero end up undermining his own country's sovereignty?  How did his call for help get such a precise and rapid response from the Japanese, while the Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese coast guard vessels could not pinpoint his whereabouts???

Does he have a hotline to Napa or Osaka?  If Taiwan did not inform Japan of the distress call, then either of two things could have happened - the balloonist sent a distress call to the Japanese with more precise information on his location than he gave the Taiwanese/Chinese coast guard, or the Japanese Coast Guard was closely monitoring the balloonist whereas the Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese Coast Guards were not at all watching out for him.

Common sense asks, "How could an intention so seemingly patriotic end up with so many gains for the Japanese?"

To negate this false impression, China must allow another balloonist to go to Diaoyudao, and even if he fails to land on it, China must, this time, use its own Coast Guard vessels to save him.  This will cancel out the Japanese claim of control over Diaoyudao.

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Post time 2014-1-3 17:05:53 |Display all floors

... rescued by the percieved enemy


Love it {:soso_e104:} cool



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Post time 2014-1-4 16:07:54 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2014-1-4 16:08
NgTran Post time: 2014-1-3 17:05
... rescued by the percieved enemy
Love it  cool

Several other Chinese and Taiwanese civilians are planning their own balloon trips to Diaoyudao to erase the mistaken perception of China's lack of administrative control and sovereignty implicit in having this Xu Shiaojun fellow (1) fail to land on Diaoyudao, (2) rescued by Japanese Coast Guard on the spot, and (3) returned to the Chinese Coast Guard by the Japanese side.

To any intelligent person, this "patriotic mission" is not only a failure but very likely an intentionally aborted mission, as there is NO REASON for the balloonist to fail in landing on Diaoyudao after having overcome all natural and mechanical obstacles for 95% of the trip.  His failure to land near a Chinese ship that he could have radioed ahead of time, and instead landing near a Japanese ship that got his SOS ahead of all others, smacks of premeditated surrender to the Japanese government.  Knowing that Chinese patrols are nearby 24/7, he should have simply stayed afloat with his lifesaver and waited for a Chinese patrol ship to pick him up, instead of surrendering to the Japanese to save his skin that was never in any great danger, and required only a few more minutes to be saved by his own countrymen.

This fellow does not represent the Chinese people, the Chinese government, or Chinese sovereignty by his words nor by his actions which imply everything contrary to his stated intent.

Other true patriots must correct his mistakes, and (1) make sure they land on Diaoyudao next time, (2) make sure they land near a Chinese patrol boat if they are forced to by the weather or mechanical failure, and (3) never notify the Japanese Coast Guard that they need help because the Chinese Coast Guard is already there patroling China's sovereign waters around Diaoyudao.

NgTran and Seneca, don't laugh yet at this false-flag-failure.  You ain't seen nothing yet!

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Post time 2014-1-4 16:43:55 |Display all floors
abramicus Post time: 2014-1-4 16:07
Several other Chinese and Taiwanese civilians are planning their own balloon trips to Diaoyudao to  ...

Seems its becoming a preferred place for Chinese tourists.

The Japanese should build a hotel complex on those islands with a golf court and bring some white sand in from Boracay to fill up the beaches over there.

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Post time 2014-1-4 18:11:54 |Display all floors
abramicus Post time: 2014-1-4 16:07
Several other Chinese and Taiwanese civilians are planning their own balloon trips to Diaoyudao to  ...

Funny. How quickly you turned on this "Chinese patriot". Fact is, Japan saved him. There is no evidence it was a "false flag" by Japan. You have a habit of making stuff up on this forum. Good for a laugh.
Good Gweilo: My job is the ideological quality control

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Post time 2014-1-5 05:14:17 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2014-1-5 05:23
wowzers Post time: 2014-1-4 18:11
Funny. How quickly you turned on this "Chinese patriot". Fact is, Japan saved him. There is no evi ...

False flag operations by definition leave little or no evidence of their falsity, and thus, the absence of evidence in such a case cannot be construed as evidence of absence.  Rather, in such a situation, one must ask, "Who was the greatest beneficiary of the failure of the Chinese balloonist to land on Diaoyudao?  What kind of benefit was it?  And, could it be "arranged" with the protagonists to end in the best possible way for the sponsor, and the worst possible way for China?"  Failure to ask such questions belies either a simplistic mind or a dishonest one, because every failure requires at the very least, an analysis of why it failed, who failed, how such failure can be avoided, and how the damage resulting from the failure can be remedied.  Accepting the failure without proper followup analysis, and attempt to remedy its deleterious effects, would be irresponsible when the result of the failure is a de facto implication that Japan as of January 1, 2014, still has de facto administrative control over Diaoyudao, and therefore, in matters of sovereignty, has a stronger claim than a China that does not have such administrative control.  Even if the failure were truly accidental, due to the vagaries of the weather, the damage to China's claim of administrative control bought with so much bravery and determination by the rest of the Chinese navy, Marine Surveillance Bureau, and Coast Guard, toughing out the establishment of the ADIZ against hostile intimidation, must be repaired by a followup civiilan attempt to land on Diaoyudao, which if it fails again, should end up being rescued instead by the Chinese Marine Surveillance vessels, and NOT by the Japanese ships, whose presence in the area is totally unnecessary and superfluous, as the balloonist would most certainly have been saved by Chinese or Taiwanese Coast Guard vessels instead in a very short time without the Japanese doing it.  Thankful for a service that is unnecessary?  Yes, to some extent, as long as it does NOT come with the big price tag of China's sovereignty over Diaoyudao.  Would you not say so?

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Post time 2014-1-5 05:31:16 |Display all floors
NgTran Post time: 2014-1-4 16:43
Seems its becoming a preferred place for Chinese tourists.

The Japanese should build a hotel comp ...

You know, if Diaoyudao really belonged to the Japanese, they should have built a hotel on it long ago.  The fact is, they have not, and will never do so.  Does that not tell you something about Japan's claim of so-called "sovereignty" over Diaoyudao?  Anyways, Chinese tourists love outdoor beauty.  Diaoyudao as it is is lovable to them enough.  Nothing the Japanese could build on Diaoyudao can surpass its native Chinese beauty.

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