Author: abramicus

Congratulations to the Chinese Marine Surveillance Vessels for a Job Well Done! [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 02:30:20 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2013-4-29 04:12

FOR WANT OF A NAIL, A KINGDOM, NAY, A DYNASTY, WAS LOST - THE HISTORY OF THE DEFEAT OF KING RICHARD III AT BOSWORTH FIELD.

One can say from hindsight that the most important event that was more important than even WWI and WWII, including the Protestant Schism and the religious wars ensuing from it, was the death of King Richard III at Bosworth Field on August 22, 1485.  This event brought to a close the War of the Roses, ended the mighty Plantagenet dynasty, and gave birth to the House of Tudor, Stuarts, Hanover and Windsor.  It preceded the defeat of the Spanish Armada by Elizabeth I in 1588 at the Battle of Gravelines, which sounded the death knell of the Spanish empire, the British colonization and replacement of the Spanish in North America, the birth of the American colony and republic, and the British incursions into Japan, China and India, as well as Africa and the Middle East.  Which all brings us to this day.

But what happened at Bosworth Field, and what role did a lowly nail have to do with it?

King Richard III of York, marched out of with a superior force of 12,000 against the inexperienced Tudor challenger to his throne, Henry VII of Richmond, who had just landed at remote Milford Haven of Southwest England on August 7, 1485, and mustered a force of 5,000, composed of Lancastrian supporters, French mercenaries and some Welshmen.  Unknown to King Richard III, the loyalty of Lord Stanley and his brother, Sir William Stanley, powerful Welsh noblemen, had shifted to Henry VII, though they promised to show up at the battlefield (with his son, Strange, held as hostage by King Richard III as surety).  King Richard III's most trusted ally, the Duke of Norfolk, commanded his right flank which attacked the forces of Richmond, commanded by the Earl of Oxford, believing that their superior forces required a more aggressive strategy, but failed to gain any ground.  An apparent trap was set for King Richard III when he believed that Henry VII's bodyguards were inadequate to protect their would-be king, and when he commanded the Duke of Northumberland to attack Henry at the left flank, Northumberland was slow to act.  This prompted King Richard III to take the matter into his own hands, as he was a seasoned warrior himself, and led the charge toward Henry's entourage, killing his banner bearer on the spot with his lance, which unfortunately, broke into two in the process.  Here, legend has it that his trusted war horse was unable to run as nimbly as it was used to because a horseshoe had fallen off one of its hoofs.  And the reason was the horseshoe cobbler missed (intentionally or not, we will never know) putting a nail on the horseshoe.  Because of this, Richard's horse was targeted and slain.  At the same time, Lord Stanley decided to switch loyalties in battle and swept down against King Richard III, who was still fighting valiantly on his feet.  Now surrounded and outnumbered, King Richard III was killed in battle with a blow behind his head, and slaughtered with multiple other wounds, as the recent discovery of his remains in August 2012 underneath a parking lot, eventually proved.

Shakespeare immortalized King Richard III's loss of his horse and desperate plea to get one from any of his knights with "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!".  Obviously, it was his only way of escape.  To no avail.

This is not to say that King Richard III was a good person at all, being widely suspected of murdering his two nephews who were supposed to be under his protection until they came of age, one of whom was to be the king.  Indeed, in Asian culture, his fate could have been attributed to "karma" in that he was ultimately killed through the betrayal of Lord Stanley and Sir William Stanley.

But the lesson to be learned from this story is that LOGISTICS remain the key to victory or defeat in any battle.

For want of a nail, the horsehoe was lost.  For want of a horseshoe, the horse was lost.  For want of a horse, the rider, the king, the kingdom, and even the Plantagenet dynasty, was finally lost.

A similar chain of events occurred in 1894, when the Dowager Empress was betrayed by her most trusted general and diplomat, Li Hongzhang, who served as her Prime Minister, who was bribed by the Japanese to erode the logistics of the Beiyang Navy.  In the heat of the Naval Battle of the Yellow Sea, a superior Chinese armada with more ships and better ships than the Japanese, lost miserably, as some ran out of shells to fire, and those who did have shells, found them stuffed with dirt or concrete powder which landed without exploding on the Japanese ships that survived all their bombardments.  For want of a shell, a navy was lost.  For want of a navy, a country was lost.

China should learn from the lessons of other countries, never again to miss even one nail or one shell, or one drop of gasoline, or one backup battery, because the world WAS changed because of the lack of ONE SINGLE NAIL.

And this promises to be the future focus of Japan and other enemies in trying to dismantle China.  It worked once.  It surely can work again.  

Corruption, treachery, and cutting the logistics of China, remain its three major weaknesses, before and even today.  Failure of logistics should not be considered just an act of thievery, laziness or sloppiness.  It is an act of TREASON and can be a capital offense in every sense of the word.



Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 02:38:55 |Display all floors

"When Benjamin Franklin first included a version of the next rhyme in his Poor Richard's Almanack, America and England were on opposite sides of a struggle and an ocean:

For want of a nail the shoe was lost,
For want of a shoe the horse was lost,
For want of a horse the rider was lost
For want of a rider the battle was lost
For want of a battle the kingdom was lost
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.

During World War II, this verse was framed and hung on the wall of the Anglo-American Supply Headquarters in London, England. The allied forces, in effect, saved the kingdom by heeding the warning inherent to the rhyme. Production lines ran non-stop to make sure the shoe was never without a nail, the horse never without a shoe, the rider never without a horse, and the battle never without a rider. Translated to ammunition, tanks, and troops, this made for a war-winning effort."

Source: www.inheritage.org.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 03:01:11 |Display all floors
THERE IS NO FRONT WITHOUT A BACK

In World War II, this verse was reportedly hung on the walls of the Anglo-American Supply Headquarters in London, England. Production ran continuously 24/7 to make sure that every equipment was never without a part, and every personnel was never without his equipment, and every engagement never without enough fighters, and thus, every battle was never without an effective fighting army.  In equivalent, ammunition, weapons, transport, and troops terms, this ensured that no victory is wasted, and no defeat is not reversed.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 03:12:06 |Display all floors
abramicus Post time: 2013-4-29 03:01
THERE IS NO FRONT WITHOUT A BACK

In World War II, this verse was reportedly hung on the walls of th ...

WW 2 win already can say any thing la.

But the truth is that by Ww2, the British .......except for the RAF, are lousy warriors.


The British did not win.....


The Germans were defeated already by the Russians.
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 03:17:47 |Display all floors
Revo, you know very well the story about WWII is merely to illustrate how the saying applies to the present and the future.  By the way, WWII is not over, in case you do not know.  Japan has just reneged on its Instrument of Surrender of 1945.  How can it be over if Japan never really surrendered, and now celebrates its Class A War Criminals as its national heroes and gods, and even considers its bloody invasion of China, Korea, and the Pacific Islands, as  its proud history and tradition???

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 03:18:29 |Display all floors
Diaoyudao is China's Pearl Harbor.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-4-29 03:31:28 |Display all floors
abramicus Post time: 2013-4-29 03:18
Diaoyudao is China's Pearl Harbor.

Diaoyudao is to China what Waterloo  is to Napolean.

One wrong move by China

It will be China vs the rest of the world.
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.