Author: 29042012

Beijing restaurant’s xenophobic sign ignites online fury   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-2-27 22:22:14 |Display all floors

A sign at a Beijing restaurant barring citizens of nations involved in maritime disputes with China -- along with dogs.
It is indeed very practical that the party is  judge, legislator, head of the army, executor  and  publisher  all in one in China.

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Post time 2013-2-27 22:41:09 |Display all floors
Vietnamese Angry Over Beijing Restaurant Racism

A Beijing restaurant’s refusal to serve customers from countries locked in maritime territorial disputes with China has drawn the ire of netizens from at least one of the nations—Vietnam.

The restaurant has put up on its window racially charged signs in Chinese and English that said, “This shop does not welcome Japanese, Filipinos, and Vietnamese, and dogs,” according  to  photo posted on the Facebook social networking site last week.

The owner of the restaurant in Beijing’s Houhai neighborhood, surnamed Wang, told BBC News this week he doesn’t care what others feel about the sign and that he  put it up out of “patriotism.”

“Chinese customers support me,” he said.

China is currently embroiled in territorial disputes with Japan over islands in the East China Sea, and with the Philippines and Vietnam over islands in the South China Sea. Tensions with Japan over the disputes boiled over into a wave of anti-Japanese protests in Chinese cities last fall.

But the restaurant’s action has drawn strong criticism in Vietnam, where tensions over the Spratly and Paracel islands have sparked a series of anti-China protests over the past two years.

Activists have also criticized the Vietnamese government for not standing up enough to what they see as China’s “aggressive” foreign policy in the region.

Dissident lawyer Le Hieu Dang said he thinks Chinese authorities should have taken action against the restaurant owner.

“They should have told the restaurant to take that note off and disciplined them because that insults other people in the world. It is racism. The Beijing government should have strong measures against that,” he told RFA’s Vietnamese Service.

“The government of Vietnam should see [China's] true colors through this fact that they let their people do such things.”

'Bullying' neighbor

He said the racism evident in the sign was similar to China’s “bullying” of its smaller neighbors in its foreign policy.

“I think people around the world will have strong reactions against this extreme nationalism, which shows the hatred between nations and how big country bullies small countries,” he said.

The photo, posted last week by a Chinese-American user from New York, drew a mixed response from netizens in China.

Some blasted the restaurant’s sign as nationalist racism, and others supported the restaurant owner’s action.

Dissident academic Tran Khue said he thinks the Beijing restaurant owner’s actions reflect a Sinocentric attitude that he feels is common in China.

“This mentality dates back so many years,” he said.

He said the sign was reminiscent of China’s colonial era, when British-owned establishments barred Chinese from entering.

“I think they are following what the English did before. The English said, ‘No Chinese and no dogs,’” he said.

'Not representative'

George P. Jan, a U.S.-based former professor of Chinese politics, said that the views of one restaurant owner should not be taken to represent all of China.

“This sign does not represent the attitude of most Chinese people. I think it is unwise and emotional. Chinese people are not opposed to all Japanese, Filipinos, or Vietnamese indiscriminately,” he said.

He said nationalism could cause people to get carried away with their views.

“Patriotism is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it can unite people. But on the other, it will bring disasters to a country,” he added.

Xie Xuanjun, another U.S.-based scholar, said he thought the restaurant owner had succeeded more in embarrassing Chinese people than in denigrating those of other races.

“The sign itself is a symbol of racism, and ironically the restaurant owner has drawn ridicule on the Chinese ourselves,” he said.

He asked why the restaurant owner had not refused to serve patrons from Russia, which was embroiled in a long-running dispute over islands near China’s northeast until 2008.

“If he refuses to serve people from Japan, the Philippines, and Vietnam because of their territorial disputes with China, why doesn’t he refuse to serve Russians? Russia has grabbed more land from China than the other three countries.”

“Is it because Russians are Caucasians?” he said.

Rose Tang, the original poster of the photo, has asked netizens to share the photo widely in the hopes it will spark more discussion about racism.

“Please share it with as many people as possible. I'm hoping pressure from the public and media will teach these guys a lesson,” she said in a comment on Facebook.
It is indeed very practical that the party is  judge, legislator, head of the army, executor  and  publisher  all in one in China.

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Post time 2013-2-27 22:43:23 |Display all floors
Dissident lawyer Le Hieu Dang said he thinks Chinese authorities should have taken action against the restaurant owner.

That is what I think, too.
It is indeed very practical that the party is  judge, legislator, head of the army, executor  and  publisher  all in one in China.

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Post time 2013-2-27 23:19:00 |Display all floors
Beijing restaurant sign banning Vietnamese, Filipinos and dogs triggers online fury

A SIGN at a Beijing restaurant barring citizens of nations involved in maritime disputes with China - along with dogs - has triggered a wave of online outrage among Vietnamese and Filipinos.
The Beijing Snacks restaurant near the Forbidden City, a popular tourist spot, has posted a sign on its door reading "This shop does not receive the Japanese, the Philippines, the Vietnamese and dog(s)."
Photographs of the controversial sign have gone viral in Vietnamese-language forums and featured heavily in Philippine newspapers and websites.
Vietnam's state-run Tuoi Tre newspaper ran a story saying the sign had "ignited online fury". It claimed many Vietnamese feel this is another example of Chinese "extreme nationalism that deserves to be condemned".
"It's not patriotism, it's stupid extremism," Sy Van wrote in Vietnamese in a comment under the story, published on the paper's website.
The sign provoked thousands of posts on Vietnamese social networking sites and newspaper comment threads.
"This is teaching hate to the younger generation," Facebook user Andrea Wanderer wrote in Vietnamese.
"The owner of the restaurant has obviously been brainwashed by their government," added Facebook user Chung Pham.
Filipinos greeted the photo with a mixture of fury and amusement.
"Blatant racism at Beijing Restaurant," journalist Veronica Pedrosa wrote in one widely-shared tweet, while Facebook user Rey Garcia used a comment thread on a news site to retort: "Who cares, they almost cook everything, even foetus and fingernails."
Vietnam and the Philippines are locked in a longstanding territorial row with China over islands in the South China Sea. China and Japan have a separate acrimonious dispute over islands in the East China Sea.
Philippine Foreign Department spokesman Raul Hernandez told reporters in Manila that the Beijing restaurant sign was simply one "private view" about the maritime dispute.
The photos were originally posted on Facebook.
The sign's wording is particularly inflammatory as it recalls China's colonial era, when British-owned establishments barred Chinese from entering.
A sign supposedly reading "No Dogs and Chinese allowed" became part of Communist propaganda after it was said to have hung outside a park in Shanghai when Western powers controlled parts of China.
It has become part of Chinese folklore and featured in the 1972 Bruce Lee film Fists of Fury - but many historical experts say no such sign ever existed.
The controversial Beijing sign was still in place today, according to the restaurant owner who gave only his surname of Wang.
"No officials have contacted me about it. This is my own conduct," Mr Wang said.


It is indeed very practical that the party is  judge, legislator, head of the army, executor  and  publisher  all in one in China.

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Post time 2013-2-27 23:35:12 |Display all floors
This post was edited by youknowhat at 2013-2-27 07:36

this is extremely bad tantrum chinese behavior, and i really dont expect to see that from my own chinese people...shame shame shame  {:soso_e114:}{:soso_e109:}{:soso_e109:}
*that kind of behavior was what the west did it to us and now we must not follow their tradition to hurt other foreign nations
a man who uses his hands is a laborer. one who uses his hands and his mind is a craftsman. but he who uses his hands, his mind, and his heart, is an artist...

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Post time 2013-2-27 23:42:16 |Display all floors
There are stupid people in every country. Also in China.
I'd ignore the restaurant and enjoy my meal in a more sophisticated environment

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Post time 2013-2-28 00:34:06 |Display all floors
The Chinese government will have to accept blame for tolerating such individual outbursts of popular ostracisation. It is uncivilised.


What does it have to do with the Chinese government? It's up to every individual to say and think what they want - not up to the government.

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