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如何让你的旅游与众不同---每一个背包族必读的旅游圣经! [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2011-12-19 14:35:11 |Display all floors

作者系巴西大师级作家Paulo Coelho, 其成名作<The Alchemist>(中文翻译《牧羊少年奇幻之旅》)为世界上除圣经外最畅销的励志书,已售出超过一亿本,被翻译为66种语言,激励了无数人追求自己的梦想。此文来自他的随笔录<Like the Flowing River>.此文为翻译,供热爱旅游的背包族参考。



Translated by J.XY


如何令你的旅游经历与众不同·Travel Differently

保罗·柯埃罗  Paulo Coelho



我很早就意识到,旅行于我是最佳的学习方式。我打骨子眼儿里就是一个流浪者,四海为家。我把这篇文章献给所有热爱旅游的人,希望对你们有所启发。



1.       避免博物馆

这听起来很荒唐。不过仔细想想也是—你身处在一个陌生的城市,干嘛非要抛开它的现在而去探访它的过去呢?人们都习惯于逛博物馆,因为自幼他们就从博物馆中了解文化。当然,我不否认博物馆的重要性。但逛博物馆很耗时,而且必须抛开成见、客观地去欣赏,否则只会逛了一圈以后,只记得自己仿佛看到了一些很重要的东西,仔细一想却什么也说不出来。



2.       去酒吧逛逛

酒吧才是一座城市真正的博物馆—在这里,你可以看到一个城市摘掉面纱后的本来面目。注意我说要逛的不是迪斯科,而是酒吧,就是普通人平时没事儿去和哥们儿朋友聊聊天,抱怨抱怨天气的地方(画外音—感觉是中国的茶馆)。买一份报纸,感受人群的气息。如果某个人和你搭讪,一定要跟他聊下去,不管话题多傻—不要因为一座花园的门很破而错过她的美丽。



3.       敞开胸怀

最好的导游是市民—他/她居住在这座城市,了解城市的每一个细节,为自己的城市自豪,却不为旅行社工作。去街上大胆地向这些人问路吧(去大教堂怎么走?邮局在哪儿?)如果一个不成,换下一个—我敢保证在一天结束之后,你会找到一个很棒的玩儿伴。



4.       尝试独自旅行—如果结婚了就与配偶一起

这意味着你要自己照顾自己,可不是什么轻松活儿。但也只有这样,你才能彻底地离开自己的国家,真正地融进当地的环境。跟团儿旅行,你只会一路说母语、随大流,而且绝对会兴致勃勃地和团儿友们八卦,而不是观察当地的环境。



5.       不要比较

不要比较任何事情—物价、卫生程度、生活质量、交通工具…什么都不要比较!你旅游的目的不是为了证明你比别人活得好。你的目的是要看看别人的生活方式,看看别人如何面对现实、在平凡中找到非凡,让他们来打动你。



6.       你要明白,世界上所有人都能理解你

哪怕你不会当地的语言也不要害怕。我去过许多地方,跟当地人根本无法用语言沟通,而我每次都顺利地找到了支持与指引,有用的建议,有时甚至找到了女友。有些人错认为,如果他们独自旅行,就会永远迷失街头。把你的旅馆的名片放在钱包里—如果实在没辙,就拦下一辆出租车,把名片给他看,让他带你回宾馆。



7.       别做购物狂

把钱花在你不用带的东西上—演出票、餐馆儿、短途旅行。今天国际化进程惊人,你在哪儿都能买到世界各地的商品,还不用付多余的运费。



8.       别妄想着一个月能周游世界

在一座城市呆上三四天好,还是一周暴走五个城市好?当然是前者。城市是一个变幻莫测的女人—要想勾引她,得有耐心。



9.       旅途的本质是一场冒险

Henry Miller曾经说,发现一个无人知晓的教堂,比去罗马非要去Sistine Chapel看百万人头要有意义得多。当然,Sistine Chapel一定要去,但也别忘了游逛街道,探访小巷,感受一下发现的自由—你不知道你要找的是什么,但你很清楚,你即将发现的这个小事物会改变你。





后附原文

Travelling Differently

Paulo Coelho

I realized very early on that, for me, travelling was the best way of learning. I still have a pilgrim soul, and I thought that I would pass on some of the lessons I have learned, in the hopes that they might prove useful to other pilgrims like me.

1.       Avoid museums. This might seem to be absurd advice, but let’s just think about it a little. If you are in a foreign city, isn’t it far more interesting to go in search of the present than the past? It’s just that people feel obliged to go to museums because they learned as children that travelling was about seeking out that kind of culture. Obviously, museums are important, but they require time and objectivity—you need to know what you want to see there, otherwise you will leave with a sense of having seen a few really fundamental things, but can’t remember what they were.

2.       Hang out in bars. Bars are the places where life in the city reveals itself, not in museums. By bars I don’t mean discotheques, but the places where ordinary people go, have a drink, ponder on the weather, and are always ready for a chat. Buy a newspaper and enjoy the ebb and flow of people. If someone strikes a conversation, however silly, join in: you cannot judge the beauty of a particular path just by looking at the gate.

3.       Be open. The best tour guide is someone who lives in the place, knows everything about it, is proud of his or her city, but does not work for any agency. Go out into the street, choose the person you want to talk to, and ask them something (Where is the cathedral? Where is the post office?). If nothing comes of it, try someone else—I guarantee that by the end of the day you will have found yourself an excellent companion.

4.       Try to travel alone or—if you are married—with your spouse. It will be harder work, no one will be there taking care of you, but only in this way can you truly leave your own country behind. Travelling with a group is a way of being in a foreign country while speaking your mother tongue, doing whatever the leader of the flock tells you to do, and taking more interest in group gossip than in the place you are visiting.

5.       Don’t compare. Don’t compare anything—prices, standards of hygiene, quality of life, means of transport, nothing! You are not travelling in order to prove that you have a better life than other people. Your aim is to find out how other people live, what they can teach you, how they deal with reality and with the extraordinary.

6.       Understand that everyone understands you. Even if you don’t speak the language, don’t be afraid. I’ve been in lots of places where I could not communicate with words at all, and I always found support, guidance, useful advice, and even girlfriends. Some people think that if they travel alone, they will set off down the street and be lost forever. Just make sure you have the hotel card in your pocket and—if the worst comes to the worst—flag down a taxi and show the card to the driver.

7.       Don’t buy too much. Spend your money on things you won’t need to carry: tickets to a good play, restaurants, trips. Nowadays, with the global economy and the internet, you can buy anything you want without having to pay excess baggage.

8.       Don’t try to see the world in a month. It is far better to stay in a city for four or five days than to visit five cities in a week. A city is like a capricious woman: she takes time to be seduced and to reveal herself completely.

9.       A journey is an adventure. Henry Miller used to say that it is far more important to discover a church that no one else has ever heard of than to go to Rome and feel obliged to visit the Sistine Chapel with two hundred thousand other tourists bellowing in your ear. By all means go to the Sistine Chapel, but wander the streets too, explore alleyways, experience the freedom of looking for something—quite what you don’t know, but which, if you find it, will, you can be sure, change your life.

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Post time 2011-12-22 11:20:44 |Display all floors
thank you for sharing.

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Post time 2011-12-22 17:05:44 |Display all floors
experienced

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Post time 2011-12-29 15:20:16 |Display all floors

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