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English lectures: a must or an obstacle? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2011-4-14 21:53:48 |Display all floors
English lectures: a must or an obstacle?

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Post time 2011-4-14 21:54:49 |Display all floors
English lectures: a must or an obstacle?
By Han Sang-hee

South Korea's top universities have been hell bent on expanding classes that are conducted all in English in recent years amid ever-increasing competition to globalize both their students and professors. At the forefront of this movement is the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST).

It's true that English lectures at universities started so students could develop their English skills and advance them to an international level. But how effective are such classes?

The controversy was reignited after students and professors at KAIST pointed out the ineffectiveness and impracticality of teaching various subjects in English, followed by the five recent suicides and mounting criticism of the school's president Suh Nam-pyo and his hardcore policies.

"Teaching English lectures is downright crazy," said Prof. Choi Gwang-mu from the department of computer science at KAIST.

"Teaching in English is like having students study during math class. Just because you learn a subject in English does not mean you are globalized. Students should have pride in their mother tongue. It's wrong to force them to study in English," he added.

English lectures started in 2007 and was lauded a proud asset of KAIST, a gathering of some of the brightest minds in the country. The school has offered English lectures before, but it was after president Suh came into office when the policy applied to all of its classes.

Now, many universities offer English lectures. They seek to raise the percentage of classes conducted in English in order to get higher assessments in internationalization in a number of evaluations by the government or other private ranking institutes.

But the value and utility are still questionable.

"Let's be frank. Both the professors and students are under a lot of stress," said a professor from a national university outside Seoul, who wished to be identified only as Hong. It was obvious English lectures were a burden for everyone: it takes twice as much time for the professors to prepare, while the students have to re-study what they learned during the lectures back in Korean.

"English is a language and the subject taught at school is knowledge. I don't know why people underestimate Korean. Many Korean students are not even perfect in Korean, and they listen and study subjects in English. It's like nurturing cripples," he said.

Divided opinions

"In all honesty, learning something like social organization in English is a burden. It's hard to understand it even in Korean," said Seo Seong-woo, a senior at a university in Seoul. He added that everyone would sit in class, listen to the professor but study it all over again after the lecture in Korean.

"It can be useful in a way because you get to be in an English-only environment for even a short time, but when it comes to sharing opinions and expressing your ideas logically, this can be a challenge," he said.

A fellow KAIST graduate, currently an office worker, added that many students should have expected what the environment would be like, yet still thought there needed to be a consensus between the professor and students regarding the issue.

He said, "Of course it's tough. We all knew it would be tough, but we chose to come anyway. And if you think about it, English is a must in Korean society and for those who want to study abroad, I think it's better to struggle now than later."

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Post time 2011-4-14 21:58:35 |Display all floors
From the late 1990s, many Chinese universities began to teach almost all of the subjects of some majors in English too.

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Post time 2011-4-14 22:05:37 |Display all floors
It said many Chinese universities adopted English as the teaching language for almost all of subjects before 1949. These universities used the same textbooks as the America

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Post time 2011-4-14 22:08:15 |Display all floors
I think it's a good thing - most science books are written in english anyway and all international students usually speak english, so it makes life a lot easier if the teachers also teach in english.
In my university, there are 50 percent foreign students (and just as many foreign professors) and every native student must know at least 3 foreign languages to be accepted, so all classes are taught in a foreign language.

Students already know their mother tongue, so if you study in a foreign language, you can learn that language and at the same time learn the science - so you're more productive. I don't know why it should mean that you aren't proud of your mother tongue just because you study other languages (or use them to communicate...)

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Post time 2011-4-14 22:22:57 |Display all floors
Originally posted by Everynowhere at 2011-4-14 22:08
I think it's a good thing - most science books are written in english anyway and all international students usually speak english, so it makes life a lot easier if the teachers also teach in englis ...


mhh,
depends,
was hell listening a germanophone professor apeaking in worse accent than myself to all germanophone students,
also, in engineering, of course, technical english necessary,
but not as important as it was then in economics.

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Post time 2011-4-14 22:24:40 |Display all floors
Originally posted by 468259058 at 2011-4-14 22:05
It said many Chinese universities adopted English as the teaching language for almost all of subjects before 1949. These universities used the same textbooks as the America


and thus made higher education widely accessable to other than bourgious urban dwellers,
or whut?

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