Author: woodenbird

Foreign Teachers in China---Pro and Con [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 4

Post time 2007-1-24 17:11:46 |Display all floors
Agreed with pandamonium.  I am actually reasonably happy in the short term on my current salary+apartment which affords me quite a comfortable lifestyle.  However, I plan to return to do my teaching qualifications as it's mostly the lack of career progression which is bothering me, rather than the salary (although I'm on a bit more than the average FT here...)

On the previous page, I quite agree with the fact that anyone who can't spell words in his own language shouldn't be teaching it.  That is quite clear.  However, I personally went to one of the best secondary schools in London, and a top ten UK University to study languages, so I feel that together with my CELTA certificate, nobody can really tell me I'm not fit to teach English here...

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Post time 2007-1-24 17:18:10 |Display all floors
I hope you can be my teacher some day.....with your CELTA certificate :)
Save the girl, Save the future.---Heroes

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Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2007-1-24 19:07:25 |Display all floors
Originally posted by myfriend at 24-1-2007 03:10
An English teacher must have a college degree from a bona fide college or university.
The teacher must have at least one year of teaching experience.
The teacher must pass an exam that includes an essay, oral interview, and basic principles of teaching.


Although I would say a degree is important, China isn't going to attract teachers who have experience. This is the thing. China attracts large numbers of foreign students or ex-students, who want to gain a good experience - it isn't about money. China, like other Asian countries, attracts some bad-eggs, but it also benefits from a relatively large supply of people willing to teach.

However because the wages are fairly low, it's never going to attract experienced teachers - they can earn far more money at home and start building their lives. So if China wants only the cream of the crop, it will have to pay for it. And I just don't think the huge number of schools and colleges are going to do that - only a few rich universities could.
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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Post time 2007-1-24 19:13:40 |Display all floors
Mind you, whilst the 'info' that prospective FTs get claims that a salary of 5000 RMB per month is 'very high', in reality, while that is 'very high' for a peasant from the countryside, a lot of urbanite Chinese earn substantially more than that.  A friend's husband is a University professor in Wuhan, and I believe he earns around 30,000 RMB.  They certainly have a lifestyle way beyond what most FTs could afford.  So obviously they have the money to pay decent salaries.

Of course, I'm not advocating 30,000 RMB per month - I would say 10,000 per month would be a reasonable amount, on balance. 3000 is far too low though especially if you want to return home each summer, save money etc.

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rovi297 has been deleted
Post time 2007-1-24 19:21:37 |Display all floors

Well, it will be perfect for us to have lots of experienced foreign teachers....

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Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2007-1-25 02:44:10 |Display all floors
Originally posted by rovi297 at 24-1-2007 11:21
nevertheless, it won't be so bad to have some inexperienced ones..

Better than nothing, please bear in your mind.


I think the point renegade was trying to make is that at least in large cities (especially on the East coast) it should be possible to pay more money to foreign teachers.

Paying more might bring in a higher class of applicant. I know that a lot of bright graduates who want to teach in the Far East get attracted to Japan, because they're able to save a lot of money from their salaries to travel home, put something towards a deposit on a new home back in their home countries, etc. That contrasts to people I know who taught in China - they said they could live an adequate lifestyle, but had little money left over at the end of it (and they couldn't travel home during their stay).
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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Post time 2007-1-25 08:54:50 |Display all floors
Well I have saved a lot of money, enough to buy a small house over here, but that's only because my wife is Chinese and makes me be so careful with money

In general I agree, as I said, those wanting 'extravagances' like pizza, coffee, beer that doesn't taste like water, the odd trip around China or to say Thailand, etc, will soon find that 3000-5000 RMB per month doesn't go very far at all, whatever the schools like to tell people about how it's a 'very good salary'!  It will cos the same to go for, say, a coffee in japan as in china, so proportional to salary it's much cheaper.

ANd let's face it, half-decent beer, pizza, coffee, we are hardly talking about beluga caviar and champagne here, they are fairly run of the mill items.

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