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Post time 2019-2-17 20:09:07 |Display all floors
pnp Post time: 2019-2-17 13:06
The two expressions are often used interchangeably; the fact you understood me means that there is ...

good said

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Post time 2019-2-18 10:43:59 |Display all floors
Thankopam Post time: 2019-2-17 20:09
good said

Thanks

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Post time 2019-2-18 11:03:53 |Display all floors
wchao37 Post time: 2019-2-17 18:41
No ambiguity is implied, pnp.

I mentioned it because I thought you were a native English speaker, ...

"I thought you were a native English speaker, "

You are right there, but you are wrong to assume that 'drunk driving' is native while 'drink driving' is not!  The fact you heard it for the first time is not my fault!

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Post time 2019-2-18 12:09:52 |Display all floors
pnp Post time: 2019-2-18 11:03
"I thought you were a native English speaker, "

You are right there, but you are wrong to assume  ...

And that's entirely possible.

So the Brits call it "drink driving"?  Or is it the Aussies?



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Post time 2019-2-20 15:51:48 |Display all floors
You are right there, but you are wrong to assume that 'drunk driving' is native while 'drink driving' is not!  The fact you heard it for the first time is not my fault!


Since for several days now you have failed to answer this question of whether the term "drink driving" derives from British or Australian origin, then i have to assume that this is your own usage.

In that case I have to tell it like it is without playing games as I am always serious about  academic subjects.

You could very well be mistaken here.

Reason:

"Drunk driving" is commonly used in the States and everywhere else where English is spoken.  NO ONE ever talks about "drink driving."  The word "drunk" is used as an adjective here which is NOT the same as the word "drink" simply because "drink" cannot be used as an adjective.

You always describe someone alcohol-intoxicated as "drunk" and NEVER as "drink."

You can admonish someone not to "drink and drive" but then the word "drink" used here is a verb which cannot be used to describe the state of someone driving while intoxicated or drunk.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

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Post time 2019-2-23 13:19:17 |Display all floors
This post was edited by pnp at 2019-2-23 13:28
wchao37 Post time: 2019-2-20 15:51
Since for several days now you have failed to answer this question of whether the term "drink driv ...

Thanks for your grammar lesson, but I really don't need it.  I am more interested in the message than the form, and 'drink driving' is as clear as 'drunk driving'!  Btw, I didn't invent it;  it has been used by the media and traffic authorities elsewhere before and I like it because it is closer to the common saying, 'When you drink, don't drive!"  That's how the drink and drive come together!

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Post time 2019-2-24 01:42:59 |Display all floors
This post was edited by wchao37 at 2019-2-24 01:45
Btw, I didn't invent it;  it has been used by the media and traffic authorities elsewhere before and I like it because it is closer to the common saying, 'When you drink, don't drive!"  That's how the drink and drive come together!

Com'on npn, this is just an academic discussion on common usage.  

Don't take it personally, and I'm not trying to 'give you a lesson.'

I suspected you've probably heard it being used in places other than where "drunk driving" is commonly used.  

That's why I asked you whether you've heard it being used in the UK or Australia.

Since your answer to this simple question was not forthcoming then I have to assume that it was your own usage.

I take all academic discussions seriously.  One is either correct or incorrect on a particular point of such discussions.  

You don't 'lose face' if you give the wrong answer.

"Drink and drive" is part of the admonishment of "Don't drink and drive" and the word "drink" is a verb that under NO circumstances can be used as an adjective by itself.

Only the word "drunk" can be used as an adjective and so "drunk driving" is the common expression used wherever English is the commonly-used language e.g. North America.

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