Author: tenderloin

China president demands the number of j20 be at least 100 by end of 2020 [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2019-1-30 01:50:59 |Display all floors
Boston101 Post time: 2019-1-29 10:10
You want to use and resell US tech products? Then you must adhere to US laws.

Just repetitious nonsense.

Read my responses again.

All the possible discussion points had been covered and you haven't answered any of them.

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Post time 2019-1-30 01:54:53 |Display all floors
wchao37 Post time: 2019-1-30 01:50
Just repetitious nonsense.

Read my responses again.
Boston101 Post time: 2019-1-26 04:34
    Since Iran took the US embassy hostage there has been a strict policy of what can be shipped there.  ...



Your argument has been presented ten thousand times and it still ain't going to work on the 10,001th attempt.

If you use this "parts-represent-the-whole" excuse then it can also be asserted that the U.S. has been illegally trading in offensive weaponry with Taiwan -- a renegade province of China -- a fact recognized by America in the Three Communiques emphasizing that there is only one China called the PRC and that Taiwan is part of that One China.

So if your claim here is allowed to stand, then turmoil would ensue with the Chinese government legally seizing the female CEO of Lockheed Martin in retaliation using the same rationale.

When you sell your parts to a business, those parts become the property of that business entity at the moment of the sale.  If you are uncomfortable with this arrangement then you shouldn't even be trading with that business at all.  

Companies like Qualcomm depend on sales to Chinese companies to keep themselves afloat.  That's the main reason why sales to ZTE were quickly restored after negotiations last year because if ZTE founders, Qualcomm would be looking at a huge financial loss.  

What the U.S. has done is to endanger the prospects of its own companies mulling over its own future purchase of Chinese parts since China is already the most innovative nation in the world in terms of patents filed and approved in the last two years, and the prospect of massive U.S. high-tech procurement from China is fast approaching.  

For instance, in the future there are bound to be unique AI-related electric-car parts that American companies will want to buy for their final assembly in Michigan.  Should China deny the sales of such parts to U.S. companies if they are suspected of trading with Taiwan or should she also seize the CEOs of U.S. companies during their transits through a third nation?

As to North Korea, Trump himself is talking to Kim Jr. and who are you to tell ZTE not to trade with the North before there were Security-Council-approved sanctions against that nation?

If there is a business conflict then the case should involve attorneys from both parties and shouldn't involve the seizure of executive officers like Meng.  

The very fact that Meng's arrest occurred on December 1, 2018 -- the same day that there was a scheduled meeting between the two leaders -- and the fact that Trump himself was offering 'help' at the crucial moment of the trade talks, proved beyond any reasonable doubt that it was a politically-motivated plot hatched in the minds of criminals camouflaged as hawks in Trump's entourage.

       
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wchao37

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    Since Iran took the US embassy hostage there has been a strict policy of what can be shipped there. If you want to use US parts then you must adhere to the Iran no ship policy. Meng fraudulently change the books to ship to Iran. ZTE shipped to North Korea which we are technically still at war with. Again, if you want to use US parts for your products then you must adhere to US policy in regards to exports. If you don't then too bad, so sad.



Your argument has been presented 10,000 times and it still ain't going to work on the 10,001st attempt.

If you use this "parts-represent-the-whole" excuse then it can also be asserted that the U.S. has been illegally trading in offensive weaponry with Taiwan -- a renegade province of China, a fact recognized by America in the Three Communiques emphasizing that there is only one China called the PRC and that Taiwan is part of that One China -- in selling Taiwan helicopters in which many electronic and non-electronic components were made in Mainland China.

So if your claim here is allowed to stand, then turmoil would ensue with the Chinese government legally seizing the female CEO of Lockheed Martin in retaliation using the same rationale.

When you sell your parts to a business, those parts become the property of that business entity at the moment of the sale.  If you are uncomfortable with this arrangement then you shouldn't even be trading with that business at all.  

Companies like Qualcomm depend on sales to Chinese companies to keep themselves afloat.  That's the main reason why sales to ZTE were quickly restored after negotiations last year because if ZTE founders, Qualcomm would be looking at a huge financial loss.  

What the U.S. has done is to endanger the prospects of its own companies mulling over its own future purchase of Chinese parts since China is already the most innovative nation in the world in terms of patents filed and approved in the last two years, and the prospect of massive U.S. high-tech procurement from China is fast approaching.  

For instance, in the future there are bound to be unique AI-related electric-car parts that American companies will want to buy for their final assembly in Michigan.  Should China deny the sales of such parts to U.S. companies if they are suspected of trading with Taiwan or should she also seize the CEOs of U.S. companies during their transits through a third nation?

As to North Korea, Trump himself is talking to Kim Jr. and who are you to tell ZTE not to trade with the North before there were Security-Council-approved sanctions against that nation?

If there is a business conflict then the case should involve attorneys from both parties and shouldn't involve the seizure of executive officers like Meng.  

The very fact that Meng's arrest occurred on December 1, 2018 -- the same day that there was a scheduled meeting between the two leaders -- and the fact that Trump himself was offering 'help' at the crucial moment of the trade talks, proved beyond any reasonable doubt that it was a politically-motivated plot hatched in the minds of criminals camouflaged as hawks in Trump's entourage.

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Post time 2019-1-30 05:04:08 |Display all floors
wchao37 Post time: 2019-1-29 15:08
I forgive your jabberwocky.

But I do know a conspiracy is cooking bigtime.

I know I’m talking like a jerk, but isn’t that the only way you could understand what I’m saying?

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Post time 2019-1-31 00:33:49 |Display all floors
Boston101 Post time: 2019-1-30 05:04
I know I’m talking like a jerk, but isn’t that the only way you could understand what I’m sayin ...

Not just talking like one......

Finish the sentence yourself.

Like I said, I'll forgive your jabberwocky, but not your contorted reasoning leading to faulty arguments.

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Post time 2019-2-1 04:57:03 |Display all floors
Too bad they filtered my last response

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Post time 2019-2-1 10:41:21 |Display all floors
Don't be naive.  

Ed Snowden's revelations in the Prism saga showed beyond reasonable doubt the U.S. had a massive, ongoing, pervasive espionage program on everything and everybody, and you'd be targeted if you participate in their forums saying things they don't like.  

At least here YOU are not targeted automatically for constantly and wrongfully making these false accusations or setting up inane defenses.

It is amusing that you keep on saying this PERSON and that PERSON has been stealing some TRADE secrets, while ignoring your institutional, massive programs of espionage against people (including Angela Merkel, for instance) and companies (like ZTE and Huawei).  

Such programs are nothing but felonious crimes at the national level, and not just stealing for personal profit.

So it is just another instance of complaining about specks in other people's eyes while ignoring the timber in your own.

If you are so advanced technologically then you should have nothing to worry about.  So why are you instigating New European countries like Poland and Czech Republic to forsake Huawei -- unless it is for political reasons?

The U.S. is the only country that has been PROVEN to have large-scale espionage programs against all others -- whether friend or foe -- simply because you had the technological edge to put in back doors in YOUR products, but the U.S. has found it conscionable to point a finger against Huawei without any proof whatsoever.

Where is the proof that Huawei has your kind of back doors and other security traps?

It is a quintessential example of "thief yelling catch-thief," and no ifs, ands or buts about it.

The example you've invoked here is a charge against an individual, and there are hundreds of possibilities from total innocence to personal gains.  

Even if true, it is nothing when compared with the massive, targeted, shameless espionage activities against the rest of the world that your employers are doing.

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Post time 2019-2-1 18:26:44 |Display all floors
Oh well; with that attitude, expect a 25% increase on tariffs in March.

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