Will China end two-child policy? - China Watch - Chinadaily Forum
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Post time 2018-8-11 10:29:45 |Display all floors

(Daily Mail) The design of China's new zodiac stamps for the year of the pig has sparked speculation that Beijing might end its two-child policy next year.

The stamps, which come in a set of two, have two different illustrations featuring pigs. One of them shows a family of five pigs: a boar, a sow and three piglets.

At present, each couple in China is allowed to have a maximum of two children. Therefore, critics and the Chinese public suspect that the three-piglet family could be sending a signal of a change in the country's mandatory family-planning policy.

The zodiac stamps for the year of the pig (pictured) were unveiled by China Post on Monday

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:30:22 |Display all floors

One of the designs shows a pig family with three piglets, sparking speculation of a new policy

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:30:57 |Display all floors

The other design shows a happy pig on its own. The stamps are designed by artist Han Meilin

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:31:36 |Display all floors
Representatives of the stamp's designer have firmly denied the rumours.

They stressed that the three-piglet family was not conveying any government policy, and it was purely an aesthetic decision.

The news came after insiders told Bloomberg in May that Beijing was planning to abolish all kinds of limit on how many children a family can have.

The controversial stamps were unveiled to the public by China Post on Monday and will go on sale on January 5 next year for 1.20 yuan (14p) each.

They are designed by 81-year-old Chinese folk artist Han Meilin who also created the mascots for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:32:55 |Display all floors

Han Meilin holds a draft of the design. He said the three piglets make the composition better

After pictures of the stamps were uploaded onto the internet, eagle-eyed Chinese web users immediately noticed the 'extra' piglet in the pig family.

A social media user, 'sven_shi', claimed the stamps showed that Beijing might encourage couples to have three children instead of two.

'Sven_shi' wrote on China's Twitter-like platform Weibo: 'The theme of the pig-year stamp is family. And in this family, there are a boar, a sow and their three piglets.

'The design is for all of us to understand that [the country] not only encourages us to have two children, but also wants us to have a third.'

Commenting on the matter, Yi Fuxian, a U.S.-based Chinese scientist and long-time critic of Beijing's birth policy, told Wall Street Journal: 'It's a clear sign that they are going to abandon all birth restrictions.'

Coincidentally, China's state newspaper People's Daily published a column on Monday, urging its government to tackle the country's low birth rate. The opinions on People's Daily are normally in line with the policies of the ruling Communist Party.

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:33:34 |Display all floors

Han also designed two drafts (above is one) that show a pig family with as many as five piglets

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Post time 2018-8-11 10:34:09 |Display all floors

Han's representatives said the artist's designs were not conveying any government policy. Above is another draft that shows a five-piglet family. It wasn't chosen to be made into stamps

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