Italians shocked by man's selfie after train accident in Piacenza - World Affairs - Chinadaily Forum
Views: 2651|Replies: 9

Italians shocked by man's selfie after train accident in Piacenza [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2018-6-5 09:32:12 |Display all floors

(BBC) When a Canadian woman was hit by a train and badly injured in northern Italy, rescue services quickly went to her aid on the tracks.

But as they treated the victim a young man captured the scene from the station platform in a selfie that has provoked widespread anger.


He was himself pictured by a news photographer who complained "we have completely lost a sense of ethics".


Police caught the young selfie-taker and forced him to delete his picture.


The young Canadian woman caught up in the accident late last month was taken to hospital and had a leg amputated.


The man in white Bermuda shorts who took the selfie on a platform at Piacenza station has been investigated and does not appear to have committed a crime.


But the image of him pointing his mobile phone at the dramatic rescue scene has appeared on many front pages in Italy and attracted incredulity on social media.


Corriere della Sera said he appeared to be making a "V for victory" sign with one hand while taking the shot with the other.


A commentary in La Stampa spoke of a "cancer that corrodes the internet". The young man who took the selfie was not bad, argued Antonella Boralevi. Instead, he had turned off his soul and his personality and become an "automaton of the internet".


Radio host Nicola Savino told listeners that the human race was "galloping towards extinction". One user on Twitter said simply: "Nothing surprises me any more."

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2018-6-5 09:33:48 |Display all floors
1.jpg

Journalist Giorgio Lambri, who photographed the scene on 26 May, wrote about his experience on Sunday for Piacenza newspaper Liberta under the headline: "The barbarism you don't expect: the 'selfie' in front of a tragedy."

He also posted his story on Facebook, suggesting an alternative headline of "Houston, we've got a problem", because of the man's apparent lack of moral compass.

Mr Lambri informed rail authorities about what had happened and the man has since been identified.

What remains unclear is how the young woman was hit by a train in the first place.

According to reports at the time, the control system for closing the train's doors was defective and the woman may have fallen out of the train while opening a door on the wrong side. However, there was also a suggestion that she may have been rushing to board the train as it was leaving the station.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2018-6-6 20:34:15 |Display all floors
ceciliazhang Post time: 2018-6-5 09:33
Journalist Giorgio Lambri, who photographed the scene on 26 May, wrote about his experience on Sund ...

Another example of our modern society...

3 June 2018
A policeman’s angry Facebook post criticising onlookers who filmed the rescue attempt of a drowned teen on their mobile phones, obstructing police, has gone viral in Sweden.

Johan Spånbo, from police in Örebro, central Sweden, claimed that officers rescuing a 17-year-old who had sunk beneath the waters of Lake Möckeln on Friday evening, had been forced to waste time physically removing people from the pontoon so that rescue services could do their work.
“I want to question the people who took out their mobile phones and started to make a private photo documentation of the boy as he was being pulled out of the water,” Spånbo wrote in a post on Facebook on Saturday.

"That they also had the gall to quibble when I asked them to put away their phones out of respect for the boy is outrageous and completely lacking in normal respect”.

The youth, who spent some 20 minutes underwater before his drowned body was pulled to the surface, was taken to hospital but could not be resuscitated.  

Spånbo accused those who had been out at the campsite in Degernäs, Örebro county, on Friday of obstructing the operation.

“Police at the site were forced to waste resources physically moving people from the pontoon in order to free up space for the rescue services,” he wrote. “There were even adults who were lifting up their children ‘so that that could see better’.”

At the end of his post Spånbo asked why people had even wanted to take such photos, and questioned whether it was reasonable to do so.

“Let this be the last time and learn from this,” he said. “Next time, God forbid, it could be your child lying there.”

According to Swedish rescue workers, operations are obstructed increasingly often by curious onlookers trying to film them on their phones.

"What's different today is the filming and photographing, that people push forward to get a better angle," Peter Bergh, chair of Sweden's fire and rescue workers' union, told the TT newswire. "Either the police have to work with that or we have to deploy some bloke to keep people at a distance so we can work in peace."

"It's not ethically defensible to photograph people in these sorts of tragic situations or accidents," said Gordon Grattinge, chairman of Sweden's ambulance drivers' union. "You'd think people would get that

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Post time 2018-6-7 04:36:00 |Display all floors
Round Up is good for developing the mind

Use magic tools Report

2018 Most Popular Member 2018 Most Popular Member 2016 Most Popular Member Medal Gold Medal

Post time 2018-6-7 07:30:00 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2018-6-7 10:28:32 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2018-6-7 07:30
Selfies, the only Chinese invention in recent centuries that has become a global mass phenomenon...

Australia has proudly laid claim to inventing the term “selfie” - named 2013 word of the year by Oxford Dictionaries – after its first known use was revealed to be by an Australian describing a photograph taken while drunk at a 21st birthday party.
Selfie is far from being a strictly modern phenomenon.  In fact, the picture considered by many to be the first photographic portrait ever taken was a “selfie”. The image in question was taken in 1839 by an amateur chemist and photography enthusiast from Philadelphia named Robert Cornelius. Setting up his camera at the back of the family store in Philadelphia, Cornelius took the image by removing the lens cap and then running into frame where he sat for a minute before covering up the lens again. On the back of the image he wrote “The first light Picture ever taken. 1839.”

Use magic tools Report

2018 Most Popular Member 2018 Most Popular Member 2016 Most Popular Member Medal Gold Medal

Post time 2018-6-7 12:33:45 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.