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What can you do for the environment?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-6-6 00:01:39 |Display all floors
World watch institute

As of late June, 297 cities in China had not yet built adequate sewage treatment plants, an official with the Ministry of Construction reported on October 10th. Of these nearly 300 cities, 63 are larger urban areas, including 8 with populations of more than 500,000. The Ministry urged these remaining cities to deal with their wastewater treatment problems quickly, noting that inspection would occur at a later date.

Sewage treatment in Chinese cities has developed rapidly in recent years, playing an important role in boosting urban water quality. By the end of 2004, 708 treatment plants had been built in 661 cities, with a combined capacity of 49 million cubic meters per day, twice the capacity in 2000. The annual amount treated is 16.3 billion cubic meters, up 43 percent from 2000. In total, 45.7 percent of all sewage in China is now treated.

Plant construction in China has been imbalanced, however, with eastern cities faring better than cities in the northeastern and western regions. Without adequate facilities to treat their sewage, cities either release this waste untreated into nearby rivers or dump it onto surrounding farmlands. The shortage of high-quality water has become a serious issue in many localities, and water pollution continues to threaten both public health and living standards.

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Post time 2017-6-6 00:04:51 |Display all floors
This post was edited by 1584austin at 2017-6-6 00:05

China.org.cn

All Chinese Cities to Have Sewage Treatment Plants by 2010

All the Chinese cities must have operating sewage treatment plants by 2010, with 70 percent of urban sewage treated before being discharged into the environment, the deputy minister of construction Qiu Baoxing has said.

Speaking at a national conference on water pollution control last week, Qiu said currently there are 791 sewage treatment plants operating in 383 Chinese cities.

Qiu's speech, made available to Xinhua Tuesday, said 52 percent of the urban waste water in China is treated before being discharged, up 18 percentage points from 2000.

In 135 major cities, 70 percent of the waste water are already being treated.

Qiu, however, said the country's water pollution situation is still grave, as 278 cities have yet to build their sewage plants, while many plants are running at lower-than-designed capacities. Some are not even running at all.

To ensure the attainment of the goals, the deputy minister said municipal authorities must include water pollution control into their urban planning.

The lack of proper sewage collecting networks is partly to blame for the under-utilization of the sewage treatment capacity.

Zhang Yue, the deputy director of the ministry's urban construction department, said earlier that the issue arises from the fact that many sewage treatment plants are financed by the central government through treasury bonds, while the sewage collecting networks are usually the responsibility of local governments.

Qiu said government shall have to change its policy and inject more funds into the building of sewage collecting networks.


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Post time 2017-6-6 00:08:11 |Display all floors
1584austin Post time: 2017-6-6 00:04
China.org.cn

All Chinese Cities to Have Sewage Treatment Plants by 2010

South China Morning Post

Filled with floating rubbish, stinking of sewage and darkened to a shade of black – this is Maozhou River, Shenzhen’s largest river and one of the most heavily polluted parts of the Pearl River Delta.
The river basin, home to about three million people, is slated for an extensive clean-up project costing over one billion yuan (HK$2 billion), Shenzhen Evening News and Sina News reports confirmed.
The “Maozhou River Rehabilitation Project” is part of a larger “Guangdong Clean Water Action Plan” designed to improve environmental conditions in the Pearl River Delta. The clean-up of Maozhou River is expected to finish in 2015, but the process faces significant obstacles – including severe amounts of ammonia, phosphorus and nitrogen in the river’s water that are 23 times higher than the amount deemed safe for drinking.
Maozhou River, sometimes called the “black river” by Shenzhen residents, is most polluted in its tributaries, which are filled with construction sewage and other rubbish accumulated from nearby industrial complexes. The 250 factories near the river are well known for heavy polluting, and the region’s high migrant worker population has kept the factories in business and done little to stem the side of pollution, Shenzhen Daily reported.
Feng Shaohui, vice head of Guangming New District, one of the Shenzhen regions heavily involved in the Maozhou River Rehabilitation Project, told Shenzhen Daily reporters that a 124-kilometre sewage pipe would be built in Guangming to treat wastewater and other refuse.
Despite Feng’s claims that the construction of this pipe would be a major step in treating pollution, Shenzhen residents interviewed by Sina News were not especially optimistic, and most had reluctantly resigned themselves to the river’s condition.
“For several years now there have been people paying attention to the Maozhou River [problem], and there have been more than a few government cries [to clean the river],” a Shenzhen resident surnamed Li reportedly said. “But the water still stays black.”

“My family doesn’t dare open our windows,” said a woman surnamed Chen who has lived near the Maozhou River for 10 years. “Industrial companies keep on pouring their sewage into the water, and the stench gets worse and worse daily. But many of us have just got used to it. What else can we do?”
Online netizens commenting on news of the river’s rehabilitation echoed this sense of scepticism, and many said that their own provinces were also facing pollution issues.
“This is a problem that exists in every corner of China,” a Chengdu resident on Sina Weibo wrote. “Our rivers here [in Chengdu] are the same

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Post time 2017-6-6 01:06:58 |Display all floors
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don't buy German cars with motor-management " Made by BOSCH "
some day Jiangsu will rule China

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Post time 2017-6-6 08:06:54 |Display all floors
This post was edited by tailorsas at 2017-6-6 13:49

Thank you for taking your time for finding the proof and bringing the truth out,@1584austin,it's very nice of you.
I forgot how to forget.

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Post time 2017-6-6 15:59:11 |Display all floors
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Post time 2017-6-6 16:05:00 |Display all floors
tailorsas Post time: 2017-6-6 08:06
Thank you for taking your time for finding the proof and bringing the truth out,@1584austin,it's ver ...

Buyong xie wo de peng you

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