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[Photos] White Cliffs [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2016-11-10 11:43:40 |Display all floors
Earlier this week, it was revealed that England's famous White Cliffs Of Dover are now eroding at their fastest ever rate – and man-made changes to the coastline may be to blame.
Research published this week shows the cliffs are retreating by up to 12 inches (32 cm) each year, a huge increase from the 0.8 inches (2 cm) a year the cliffs were losing up until a few hundred years ago.
The coastline is not alone though - climate change, deforestation, tourism and industry are having a devastating effect on many of the tourism wonders of the world.




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Post time 2016-11-10 11:45:16 |Display all floors
For example, just last month an environmental reporter wrote an obituary for the Great Barrier Reef that went viral, after it was revealed that 93 per cent of the largest living thing on Earth has been affected by bleaching, which can kill coral.
Some scientists were outraged by the prematurity of the announcement.




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Post time 2016-11-10 11:49:03 |Display all floors

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Post time 2016-11-10 11:49:37 |Display all floors
It may be one of the Seven World Wonders but nearly a third of the Great Wall of China has completely disappeared, according to a report last year.
Natural erosion, human destruction and a lack of protection means that a total of 1,220 miles of the wall, which dates back more than 2000 years, has vanished.
Only eight percent of the Ming Dynasty wall, which was first built 700 years ago and is the most visible section of the wall, is well-preserved, reported the People's Daily Online.
China has passed legislation in recent years to protect the Great Wall, large sections of which have been bulldozed, pillaged for building materials or heavily restored and commercialised.
In September, efforts by the government to restore parts of the wall attracted huge criticism by Chinese social media users as a 700-year-old section of the Great Wall has been covered in cement, turning it into a smooth, flat-topped path.

The Dead sea is drying up





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Post time 2016-11-10 11:51:23 |Display all floors
The Dead Sea has attracted visitors for thousands of years who come to float in its salty waters and reap its reported health benefits.
But the coastal attraction's days could be numbered after experts discovered the sea's water level is dropping by an average of one metre every year.
The drop in levels is thought to have been caused by more water flowing out of the sea than into it from the Jordan River.
It is estimated that the Dead Sea’s water level has dropped by more than 131ft (40 metres) since the 1950s.
The Maldives are sinking



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Post time 2016-11-10 11:52:52 |Display all floors
Rising sea levels threaten about a tenth of the world's population who live in low-lying areas and islands which are at risk of flooding, including the paradise islands of the Maldives.
Measures to limit sea rises have focused on lowering temperatures - but this may not be enough.
Even if global average temperatures fall and the surface layer of the sea cools, heat would still be mixed down into the deeper layers of the ocean, causing continued rises in sea levels.
Amid fears many of the islands will soon sink into the sea, the Maldivian government has started to build man-made islands for its inhabitants.
The 18,000-year-old Chacaltaya glacier that has vanished



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Post time 2016-11-10 12:54:12 |Display all floors
Sitting 17,388ft (5,300 metres) up in the Andes of Bolivia, around 18 miles (29km) from La Paz, the snow-covered slopes of Chacaltaya once boasted the world's oldest ski resort.
The 18,000-year-old glacier was also home to the highest ski lift in the world, powered by an old car engine that dragged a tow rope up the mountainside.
While it never attracted vast numbers of skiers, it was a ski adventure for those willing to make the long and often difficult journey to the glacier.
However, between 1940 and 1982, the glacier shrunk from covering an area of 2.4 million square feet (222,967 square km) to 1.5 million square feet (139,355 square km).
By 1996 it had reduced further to 861,000 square feet (79,990 square km) before disappearing completely in 2005.
The Nazca lines in southern Peru were washed away




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