Author: english-learner

Why few Chinese brands make it abroad?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-12-17 19:56:23 |Display all floors
This post was edited by sfphoto at 2014-12-17 20:47
seneca Post time: 2014-12-17 13:40
I am not sure. I feel China badly missed its chance to promote typical Chinese quality products. ...

I mentioned Brazil in my earlier example to prove my point regarding the importance of branding in consumer marketing. Your example of Chinese tea merely confirms my observation that the quality of Chinese-made goods is not the problem; it is the poverty of the Chinese masses that is causing the marketing problem for Chinese brands. In Quanzhou, for example, tea drinking is part and parcel of the local culture: high-end, mid-end and low-end tea shops abound. The highest quality local teas called te-quan-in come in different varieties depending on where they're grown, when they're harvested and how they're processed. You won't find those products in Western markets, where Chinese tea mostly comes from Guangzhou or Yunnan but you will find them in East Asia where tea aficionados know about the quality of Fujian tea.

The myth that China doesn't produce good quality products is just a myth. It's mostly due to the practice of Western companies such as Walmart to import low-cost, poor-quality consumer goods to the U.S.A. Since Walmart cares about profits more than quality, their sourcing agents buy the lowest-cost products from their Chinese suppliers to sell at the highest retail prices to their mass-market consumers in the U.S.A. And it's not just Walmart. Go to eBay or Amazon and you will find lots of cheaply-made products from China being sold by U.S. resellers to online bargain-hunters.

There are lots of high-quality manufacturers in China. For example, I was shopping around for an air-purifier product in China and found out that there are 200 brands, both local and foreign, being sold in the market. I settled for a Chinese company which had their R&D center in Germany and their factory in China. In other words, they were using German technology and Chinese manufacturing to come up with a superior product with more features at a lower price than competing brands from foreign countries. The air purifier market in China is actually more competitive than any market in the world. So I expect a lot of product innovation in this sector as long as the air quality of Chinese cities remain abysmally low.

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Post time 2014-12-17 23:37:55 |Display all floors
Quality & quality again quality is the key to success !
Round Up is good for developing the mind

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Post time 2014-12-18 04:51:39 |Display all floors
seneca Posted On  Yesterday 13:40
sfphoto Post time: 2014-12-17 03:45      
Consumers buy brands to identify with the lifestyle assoc...

Tea is a good example, half the time I spend in China I spend in tea shops looking for quality teas to bring home. the really good stuff is not exported to the US. I will bring home 30 pounds of tea for my own use and as gifts for some oft

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Post time 2014-12-19 01:44:46 |Display all floors
raton Post time: 2014-12-15 02:10
You mean world’s largest population, and first largest economy..? I thought you made a mistake. Y ...

we are discussing about world class Brands and not manufacturer here...

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Post time 2014-12-19 22:16:05 |Display all floors
This post was edited by sfphoto at 2014-12-19 22:17
warren0353 Post time: 2014-12-18 04:51
Tea is a good example, half the time I spend in China I spend in tea shops looking for quality teas to bring home. the really good stuff is not exported to the US. I will bring home 30 pounds of tea for my own use and as gifts for some oft

East Asia has a highly-developed "tea culture". In Taiwan, for example, they even have "tea art", "tea music", "tea furniture" in addition to the wide variety of teaware.

Coffee and wine drinking is not as well-developed but a home-grown "coffee shop" and "wine drinking" lifestyle is rapidly developing in China but still a long way to go before it catches up to the West. Hopefully, there won't be the Chinese equivalent of $tarbucks which is a complete rip-off.

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Post time 2014-12-19 22:54:25 |Display all floors
This post was edited by sfphoto at 2014-12-20 00:05
seneca Post time: 2014-12-17 23:06
Of course, the Chinese public lacks the deep pockets from which to extract enough money to pay for ...

In the auto industry, China still lacks world-class brands and its local manufacturers churn out low-end models while foreign brands capture almost all the mid-end to luxury high-end market. Japanese brands used to do well in the mid-end but has seen their reputation damaged by geopolitics. Chinese consumers buy mostly European luxury brands with the Germans leading the pack (Audi, BMW and Mercedes-Benz). Volvo which is a Swedish brand acquired by a local company called Geely is apparently doing well.

Chinese auto-makers should think out-of-the-box if they want to compete against global brands in their home turf. For example, Daimler AG is selling their new-concept "Smart" car like hotcakes in China. Local companies tend to lack the imagination to come up with these kinds of cars. Hongqi is not a "real" car brand; it was used mostly for party officials during Mao's era. There are more than two dozen car manufacturers and thousands of auto parts companies in China. But they don't have a lot of new designs/technologies such as the four-wheeled two-passenger "Smart" car by Daimler AG. Local companies could have designed and manufactured such as a car especially electric vehicle companies such as BYD. But they don't want to innovate; they just want to copy and and then they try to compete on price not quality. No wonder rich Chinese consumers don't want to buy Chinese auto brands!

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Post time 2014-12-19 23:15:11 |Display all floors
Chinese porcelain is definitely a brand known world-wide.  

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