Author: DSseeing

The day when you stopped spending your parents' money   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-7-16 13:46:41 |Display all floors
now there is a trend that chinese  teenagers are more independent.

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Post time 2014-7-16 14:23:16 |Display all floors
This post was edited by ColinSpeakman at 2014-7-16 13:42

There is an old joke that we stop spending parents' money when we inherit it!
To read more about me: http://capaworld.capa.org/2014/01/17/capa-resident-director-china-programs-interview-colin-speakman/.

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Post time 2014-7-16 14:23:21 |Display all floors
I have to thank my parents for buying some things that are nice to have in the transit from teenager to adult. That included a motorbike at 16 . I then got enough practice to pass the motorbike driving test and they upgraded the bike. At 17 I had a car, a  secondhand Mini Cooper and took it from North West England to uni in London. That was it. In summer vacations I worked on the entertainment piers in Blackpool as a. bingo caller. Once in London I did loads of odd jobs alongside study. In summer vacations worked full time in London and no parental help.  So great in the transition, then on my own ever since. That's quite normal I think.
To read more about me: http://capaworld.capa.org/2014/01/17/capa-resident-director-china-programs-interview-colin-speakman/.

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Post time 2014-7-16 20:43:35 |Display all floors
I think people think chinese teenagers have no sense of independence but I think it's hard to criticise. We cannot say they have no work ethic for the following reasons:

Minimum wage differences;
In Britain one hour in a restaurant you will get approx. 70rmb + so working part time there is more than enough to the pay the bills, save up for cars etc but in China it isn't. There are places here where people get paid 4 rmb per hour, you cannot support yourself on such a low wage.

Cultural difference:
Due to the one child policy many children are looked after and maybe you can say over loved, but that is not their fault at all, it is due to the way the country developed. It is a bit harsh judging Chinese kids who rely on their parents when their parents wouldn't have their child doing a demeaning, low paying job when they could be studying even harder.
You know that every time I try to go
Where I really want to be
It's already where I am
'Cause I'm already there

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Post time 2014-7-16 21:34:56 |Display all floors
I was paid a weekly allowance of $0.25 for household chores since 1975, when I was 5. Initially, my responsibility was to keep my room tidy. In 1979, my chores included washing the dishes after supper. The allowance was never increased although in summer 1983, mowing the 0.3 acre was added to the list of responsibilities.

I was allowed to earn money outside. Initially, I found dropped money, and then in 1981, I sold excess property. I opened my first bank account with the Royal Bank of Canada in 1977, an put the $30 per month from the government into the account. I was prohibited from touching the $30 per month. I was allowed to save or spend what I earned through work. When the Royal Bank of Canada paid me interest on my account balance, I skipped classes to instruct the bank to reverse the arithmetic mistake, so in response, a nice bank teller explained what interest is. I understood although I was 7. I stayed with the Royal Bank of Canada my whole life.

In 1984, I began cleaning for $8 per hour, working in the school library for $5 per hour, and volunteering for the government of Canada to do filing of encoded documents after classes, for one hour each workday. The school administration wanted to send me to the Lester B Pearson College of the Pacific and we found a chance for a sojourn in France which we guessed we could do in sequence.

In 1986 to 1987, I didn't work for money. Instead, I lived on the $2000 I had saved since 1977, paying for 2/5ths of the cost of my sojourn in France for 9 months, then I challenged grades 11 and 12 by examination, got university acceptance, then relocated to Britain where the Government gave me citizenship.

In 1987, in Britain, I worked part-time and did my maths A level in a few months. Prior to the A-level examination, my work for money was housekeeping, being a nanny of a two year old. Daily I was at work at 0500 to vacuum a department store for two hours. After the A-level exam in 1988, I worked full-time at McDonald's where I began learning the turn-key business solution. I was required to return to Canada although I didn't want to since I had two full-time jobs, friends, good personal relations in Bath, England, and was considering signing up with the British military in view of what had happened to my education.

In 1988, at 17, I left home and stayed financially self-supportive through work. I put myself through university, 5 classes, 1 full-time, 2 part-time jobs and tutoring mathematics. I mathematized business in 1990. My parents never said they were proud of me, nor of these achievements nor of my near perfect grades in mathematics since grade 9 [1984]. Instead, I was expected to support the family with loans, with being the emotionally strong one, with baby-sitting the family house and pets regardless of my schedule so family members could go on vacations. The requests for loans stopped in 1990, while I was starving, after I made the condition for a loan the requirement of being nice at some time while not requesting a loan.

In 1990, I proposed allowing me to tutor Calculus in large groups on a drop in basis, $5 door fee, for several hours at a time during exam preparation. I had the student requests to guestimate income between $100 to $200 per hour for many hours during the preparation season. I was not allowed to do the work since I was not allowed to earn a profit although many students requested I tutor them and I could not make the time available to the students in small groups. I went hungry through the holiday seasons.
Jennifer Han Zhenhao
https://www.persuasive-logic-free-english-lessons.com

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Post time 2014-7-18 13:21:38 |Display all floors
I think the "culture " part should take great responsibility for that. The first thing, parents take for granted that children should help them with house work since they work hard to support the family, let alone pay us. Another thing, parents, in their own experience, perceive that education is the only chance to improve life quality, change the destiny or get a good job, whatever. So, a large part of the families rather struggle to make ends meet while put the children through the college. This nurtures the view that distraction during studying time is a waste of time and opportunity. I took a part-time job in a cafe at junior year which was described by my classmates as crazy. I met some great friends and the boss taught me something I would never learn at the school. One more culture factor, old Chinese society favors boys. Back to when I was a kid, I got no money by doing chores or taking care of my little sister. I had to do those things coz my mom and dad were far away from home with the attempt to "make" a son. So, my happy childhood came to an end. Well, they never succeeded. They love me and I love them, too. Thankfully, I got good scores at school which kept me inside the campus until university instead of getting married and having kids. In short, "Chinese have it easy"? Yes, some.

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