Author: ttt222

China opposes foreign intervention in Hong Kong's affairs   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-9-28 14:38:03 |Display all floors
1840542824 Post time: 2013-9-28 06:23
The real Identity of the West is in this Passage of the Prophecy of Daniel

More appropriately for China and the Chinese is: To remember and constantly be reminded what the former Chinese President, Hu Jintao's speech,    delivered at the Second Plenary Meeting of the Sixth Plenum of the 17th Central Committee of CPC:
Translation...(not absolute)...

更恰当地说为中国和中国人是 : 要记住并不断地提醒六中全会精神. 中国共产党第十七届中央委员会第二次全体会议在交付前中国国家主席胡锦涛的讲话:

Excerpt.....
.... we must soberly be aware that, hostile foreign powers are intensifying strategies and plots to Westernize and divide our country, the ideological and cultural sphere is the focus sphere in which they conduct long-term infiltration.








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Post time 2013-9-28 15:52:48 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-9-27 08:30
IT is not what the coolies did that made Hong Kong successful, attractive and eventually big and g ...

Why not be honest about it? The British brought OPIUM and forced it upon the Chinese!

Translation...(not absolute) ....

为什么不是诚实的的真相!英国带来了鸦片和强制鸦片对中国人!
FIRST NATIONS ( LAKOTA PEOPLE ) Heartbreaking - (Google Search for video) "to stay true to who you are. Never allow anyone make you different or think different about what it is you are created to be ...

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Post time 2013-9-28 18:18:39 |Display all floors
March 18, 1839  Lin Tse-Hsu, imperial Chinese commissioner in charge of suppressing the opium traffic, orders all foreign traders to surrender their opium. In response, the British send expenditionary warships to the coast of China, beginning The First Opium War.
in 1852 The British arrive in lower Burma, importing large quantities of opium from India and selling it through a government-controlled opium
monopoly.
1856  The British and French renew their hostilities against China in the Second Opium War. In the aftermath of the struggle, China is forced to pay another indemnity. The importation of opium is legalized.
Opium production increases along the highlands of Southeast Asia...
1874  English researcher, C.R. Wright first synthesizes heroin, or diacetylmorphine, by boiling morphine over a stove...  
1878 Britain passes the Opium Act with hopes of reducing opium consumption. Under the new regulation, the selling of opium is restricted to registered Chinese opium smokers and Indian opium eaters while the Burmese are strictly prohibited from smoking opium.
Opium production increases along the highlands of Southeast Asia.

1874          English researcher, C.R. Wright first synthesizes heroin, or diacetylmorphine, by boiling morphine over a stove
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http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/fr ... in/etc/history.html
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Post time 2013-9-28 22:14:24 |Display all floors
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Post time 2013-9-29 06:08:24 |Display all floors
raton Post time: 2013-9-28 22:14
Don’t think I am being negative mentioning that thanks to Chinese hard HK is what is today…

HK was the gate way to Asia from the west, and vise a versa ,while across the harbour Shenzhen was a sleeply fishing village . The Chinese cannot claim full credit for HK

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Post time 2013-9-29 13:16:02 |Display all floors
Pond Post time: 2013-9-29 07:08
HK was the gate way to Asia from the west, and vise a versa ,while across the harbour Shenzhen was ...

China and India were the richest economies at the time, and Britain wanted to enter the China market.

Britain had nothing of value to China, so basically they could only buy Chinese exports in a one-way trade scenario. Coincidentally at the time, the British were the biggest drug dealers in the world (opium).
It takes about 40 muscles to smile, but only 4 to pull the trigger of a decent rifle

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Post time 2013-9-29 14:43:56 |Display all floors

RE: China opposes foreign intervention in Hong Kong's affairs

shameless Post time: 2013-9-29 12:16
China and India were the richest economies at the time, and Britain wanted to enter the China mark ...
Coincidentally at the time, the British were the biggest drug dealers in the world (opium)

England and China: The Opium Wars, 1839-60 Philip V. Allingham,

  Contributing Editor, Victorian Web; Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario  The Outbreak of the First Opium War

Excerpts


This war with China . . . really seems to me so wicked as to be a national sin of the greatest possible magnitude, and it distresses me very deeply. Cannot any thing be done by petition or otherwise to awaken men's minds to the dreadful guilt we are incurring? I really do not remember, in any history, of a war undertaken with such combined injustice and baseness. Ordinary wars of conquest are to me far less wicked, than to go to war in order to maintain smuggling, and that smuggling consisting in the introduction of a demoralizing drug, which the government of China wishes to keep out, and which we, for the lucre of gain, want to introduce by force; and in this quarrel are going to burn and slay in the pride of our supposed superiority. — Thomas Arnold to W. W. Hull, March 18, 1840ritish merchants were frustrated by Chinese trade laws and refused to cooperate with Chinese legal officials because of their routine use of torture. Upon his arrival in Canton in March, 1839, the Emperor's special emissary, Lin Ze-xu, took swift action against the foreign merchants and their Chinese accomplices, making some 1,600 arrests and confiscating 11,000 pounds of opium. Despite attempts by the British superintendent of trade, Charles Elliot, to negotiate a compromise, in June Lin ordered the seizure another 20,00 crates of opium from foreign-controlled factories, holding all foreign merchants under arrest until they surrendered nine million dollars worth of opium, which he then had burned publicly. Finally, he ordered the port of Canton closed to all foreign merchants. Elliot in turn ordered a blockade of the Pearl River. In an ensuing naval battle, described as a victory by Chinese propagandists, in November 1839 the Royal Navy sank a number of Chinese vessels near Guangzhou. By January 1841, the British had captured the Bogue forts at the Pearl's mouth and controlled the high ground above the port of Canton. Subsequently, British forces scored victories on land at Ningbo and Chinhai, crushing the ill-equipped and poorly trained imperial forces with ease. Viewed as too moderate back at home, in August 1841 Elliot was replaced by Sir Henry Pottinger to launch a major offensive against Ningbo and Tiajin. By the end of June British forces occupied Zhenjiang and controlled the vast rice-growing lands of southern China.

The key to British victory was Her Majesty's Navy, which used the broadside with equal effect against wooden-hulled vessels, fortifications are river mouths, and city walls. The steel-hulled Nemesis, a shallow-draft armed paddle-wheeler loaned to the campaign by the British East India Company, quickly controlled the river basins and the Pearl River between Hong Kong and Canton, regardless of winds or tides that limited the effectiveness of Chinese junks. On land, Chinese bows and primitive firelocks proved no match for British muskets and artillery. For leading the Royal Marines to victory General Anthony Blaxland Stransham was knighted by Queen Victoria. His forces utterly defeated on land and sea, Lin Ze-xu in September 1840 had been recalled to Peking in disgrace, and Qi-shan, a Manchu aristocrat related to the Emperor, installed in Lin's place to deal with the foreign devils whose decisive victories were undermining the authority of the Qing Dynasty, which gradually lost control of a population of 300 million.


The Second Opium Warhe outbreak of fresh hostilities under such circumstances was almost inevitable because Chinese officials were extremely reluctant to enact the terms of the treaties of 1842-44. Since the French and Americans had extracted additional concessions since the signing of the Treaty of Nanking, including clauses about renegotiation after twelve years, Great Britain insisted upon exercising its "most-favoured nation status" in 1854. This time, the British demanded that China open all her ports to foreign trade, legalise the importation of opium from British possessions in India and Burma, exempt British goods from all import duties, and permit the establishment of a full embassy in Peking. For two years Qing court officials stalled, trying to buy time. However, events ran out of their control when on 8 October 1856 officials boarded the Chinese-registered but Hong Kong-based merchant vessel Arrow, which they suspected of involvement in both smuggling and piracy. The British trade officials naturally argued that as a foreign vessel the Arrow's activities did not fall under Chinese legal jurisdiction, and that therefore the sailors who had been arrested should be released under the extraterritoriality clause of the Treaty of Nanking.

Having dealt with the temporary distraction of the Sepoy Mutiny in India, in 1857 Great Britain dispatched forces to Canton in a coordinated operation with American warships. France, seething over the recent Chinese execution of a missionary, Father August Chapdelaine, joined Russia, the U. S. A., and Great Britain against China. However, a joint Anglo-French force, without other military assistance, under the command of Admiral Sir Michael Seymour, Lord Elgin, and Marshall Gros seized Canton late in 1857 after valiant but futile resistance by the city's citizens and Chinese soldiers. In May 1858, the Anglo-French naval taskforce captured the Taku forts near Tiensin (Tianjin), effectively ending hostilities. France, Russia, the United States, and Great Britain then forced China to agree to open eleven more major ports to Western trade under the terms of the Treaty of Tientsin (June 1858). When the Chinese once again proved slow to enact the terms of the treaty, Britain order Admiral Sir James Hope to shell the Chinese forts at the mouth of the Peiho River in 1859. The Chinese capitulated, permitting all foreigners with passports to travel freely in China, and granting Chinese who converted to Christianity full property rights.

Since Chinese officials once again refused to enact a treaty provision, namely the establishment of Western embassies in Peking, an Anglo-French force launched a fresh offensive from Hong Kong in 1860, ultimately destroying the Emperor Xianfeng's Summer Palace in Chengde, and the Summer Palace and the Old Summer Palace in Peking amidst wide-spread looting by both troops and civilians.

Under the terms of the Convention of Peking, signed by Prince Gong, brother of the Emperor Xianfeng, on 18 October 1860, the ports of Hankou, Niuzhuang, Danshui, and Nanjing were opened to foreign vessels, as were the waters of the Yangtze, and foreign missionaries were free to proselytize. China had to pay further reparations, this time ten million taels, to each of France and Britain, and another two million taels to British merchants for destruction of property. Finally, China ceded the port of Kowloon to Great Britain, and agreed to permit the export of indentured Chinese labourers to the Americas. Arguably, without such a massive injection of cheap labour the transcontinental railways of the United States and Canada would not have been completed so quickly and economically. On the other hand, China's humiliation led directly to the fall of the Manchu Dynasty and the social upheavals that precipitated the Boxer Rebellion of 1900.

What had begun as a conflict of interests between English desire for profits from the trade in silk, porcelain, and tea and the Confucian ideal of self-sufficiency and exclusion of corrupting influences resulted in the partitioning of China by the Western powers (including the ceding of Hong Kong to Great Britain), humiliating defeats on land and sea by technologically and logistically superior Western forces, and the traditional values of an entire culture undermined by Christian missionaries and rampant trading in Turkish and Indian opium. No wonder the Boxer rebels' chief goal was to purify and reinvigorate their nation by the utter annihilation of all "foreign devils."

                                  ................................................

For China and the Chinese......always remember that:
"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it",




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