Views: 6050|Replies: 29

Are Mini-Reactors The Future Of Nuclear Power? [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 03:38:50 |Display all floors
Monday 4 February 2013.




The U.S. government is investing millions of dollars in what it considers a promising new industry for American manufacturing: nuclear reactors. The plan is to build hundreds of mini-reactors, dot them around the U.S. and export them overseas.

Development of these reactors are already in the works, and at one office park in Lynchburg, Va., where one of these reactors is being assembled, the traditional signs of nuclear reactors are nowhere to be found. There are no cooling towers that look like smoke stacks, no clouds of steam over the buildings - just a research building and a tower about nine stories tall.

Inside, the plant's manager, Doug Lee, leads the way down through secure doors. It feels like the inside of a refrigerator but noisier. Spinning fans and water pumps drown out the sounds of hissing steam. At the reactor core, Lee stops.

"I can't let you in here," Lee says. "But this is the base of the tower, and this is the lower portion of the large tower you saw when you came in. This is our simulated reactor vessel."

It's simulated because the design still needs Nuclear Regulatory Commission approval.

"This is analogous to the core in a nuclear plant where the fission reaction takes place," Lee says.

The entire reactor - the core, the cooling system, everything - is self-contained in this rocket-shaped steel cylinder. The industry says that makes it safer. And the reactors will be small enough to build in a factory and ship on trucks, like prefabricated houses. They'll generate about one-tenth the power of a typical nuclear power plant.

Assistant Energy Secretary Pete Lyons sees promise that goes beyond a new energy gadget. He sees jobs.

"One of the features of these small reactors is that they can be entirely manufactured here in the United States," Lyons said. "They can literally be made in the USA. With the large plants, that's simply physically impossible."

Lyons pictures churning reactors out in factories, shipping them to utilities to replace aging coal plants or selling them to developing countries - which can't afford a full-scale $15 billion nuclear plant.

"We are trying to jump-start a new U.S. industry," he says. "That's my goal: a U.S. industry, U.S. jobs, clean energy."

In November, the Energy Department invested in Babcock & Wilcox mPower, the nuclear company that built the prototype in Virginia. In total, the government plans to invest more than $400 million. Industry officials like B&W mPower President Chris Mowry say the launch funding is to get off the ground, but ultimately the reactors need to be mass-produced.

"MPower is not going to be measured in terms of success in terms of building tens of these things, but in terms of hundreds of these things," Mowry says. "We're not trying to build a Rolls Royce; we're trying to build a Ford."

That model worries Ed Lyman, a nuclear physicist with the Union of Concerned Scientists.

"My feeling is that if you're going to have a nuclear power plant, it'd better be a Rolls Royce," he says. Lyman says small reactors carry a host of safety, security, environmental and economic concerns.

"Nuclear power is a technology which is much more suited for large plants, centralized and isolated from populated areas in as small a number of places as possible," Lyman says.

He says every nuclear power plant is a target for terrorism or is at risk during a disaster. Lyman says the closer the reactors are to populated areas, the more of a threat they potentially become. That's one reason Lyman is not convinced enough demand exists for mass production. He also worries about selling them overseas.

"It's a developing country that doesn't have a substantial electrical grid that is precisely the kind of country I would not want to see have any kind of nuclear power plant," he says.

But the industry counters that these reactors are so small and self-contained, they are almost "plug and play." Smaller, cheaper, with less staff - it's your entry-level nuclear reactor, perhaps coming online in about a decade.

__________________________________________________________________________




Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 03:44:24 |Display all floors
This will be done


Its either US, Japan , Germany , france or China.


But will be available .
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 04:00:29 |Display all floors
Couple of things.

I posted something similar a long time ago.

USofA has lost the capability to manufacture the container vessel, last I spoke with one of these people (  by accident more than anything else ) only two countries have current capability to manufacture them, being Korea and UK. It would cost a lot for USofA to re-acquire this capability.

Why manufacture small units? Wouldn't the GE-size units be more economical? Well, the smaller ones fit onto ships like aircraft carriers and submarines. USofA has a big head-start there.





Let the dice fly high

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 05:27:17 |Display all floors
Deadly

The article walks around the aspects of waste storage and disposal,back up power and so on.
9/11 was an inside job.
No second plane.It was a bomb.Bomb in the other building.
You KNOW without a doubt the videos are fake,right ?!
Planes don't meld into steel and concrete buildings.They crash into them !!!!!!!
It's amazing how the building ate the plane !!!
Imagine those fragile wings cutting slots in massive steel columns !!!!!
How STUPID can they think the people are to believe that crap ??!!

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 05:53:17 |Display all floors
petera Post time: 2013-2-6 05:27
Deadly

The article walks around the aspects of waste storage and disposal,back up power and so on. ...

Mini-reactors may not be a good idea.

I don't think I'd support them.



Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 06:55:50 |Display all floors
petera Post time: 2013-2-6 05:27
Deadly

The article walks around the aspects of waste storage and disposal,back up power and so on. ...

pretty much this.

您买象牙 - 您杀了大象!
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNjU1Nzg0NDky.html - “用现代文明标准比划中国人,是严重的种族歧视行为。”
„Ich ficke wo, wen, und wann ich will, hast du mich verstanden. Auch du könntest ficken, aber du kannst es ja gar nicht, deine deutsche Genauigkeit... verbietet es dir“. Jean-Claude Juncker

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2013-2-6 07:07:12 |Display all floors
Revolutionar Post time: 2013-2-6 03:44
This will be done

A mere attempt to keep the supply side of the energy market in the hands of big oligopolists.
The sheer scale of recklessness and irresponsibility shown with it, is an indicator of just how desperate an attempt it is.
More of 50% of Germany's clean energy supply is owned by private households and farmers.
That is the clear trend they are trying to get away from,
it's the way forward,

the future.

您买象牙 - 您杀了大象!
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNjU1Nzg0NDky.html - “用现代文明标准比划中国人,是严重的种族歧视行为。”
„Ich ficke wo, wen, und wann ich will, hast du mich verstanden. Auch du könntest ficken, aber du kannst es ja gar nicht, deine deutsche Genauigkeit... verbietet es dir“. Jean-Claude Juncker

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.