Author: jackieyao2012

How to love your country?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-2-22 21:05:01 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-2-22 05:00
Mary Macgregor??? Who is she?

*Mary Macgregor (born 6 May 1948) is an American singer, best known for singing the 1976 song "Torn Between Two Lovers", which topped the Billboard charts for two weeks. her only song that i know of  
a man who uses his hands is a laborer. one who uses his hands and his mind is a craftsman. but he who uses his hands, his mind, and his heart, is an artist...

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Post time 2013-2-22 21:19:25 |Display all floors
lau_guan_kim Post time: 2012-11-7 21:00
He is a shill telling you to love Japan because it is a peaceful country.
His China bashing is the ...

agreed~
盡忠報國

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Post time 2013-2-22 21:24:04 |Display all floors
lau_guan_kim Post time: 2012-11-8 09:44
Read my post 10# and what did your statement imply.

You want the Chinese to love Japan.


盡忠報國

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Post time 2013-2-22 21:56:58 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-2-22 03:07
I think such ideological topics don't belong to the English classroom. Likewise, I don't expect a  ...

I believe you have missed my point. I was commenting on the fact that the Chinese word that means "to be patriotic" literally means "to love (one's) country", thus offering an explanation for the original poster's choice of words in English, which is clearly not his native language.

And why do such "ideological topics" not belong in an English classroom? If the class is sufficiently advanced, then the students should be able to discus all types of topics. In my high school German class (I'm an American, so German is a foreign language to me), we discussed all sorts of topics including chemistry, calculus, theoretical mathematics, and politics (back in the days of "East" and "West" Germany - the DDR and the BRD).

If anything, we should applaud the original poster for daring to step out into more abstract topics rather than writing about simpler and more concrete subjects.

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Post time 2013-2-23 04:46:52 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-2-22 12:35
I am sure the O.P. knows the semantic differences between "patriotism" and "love one's country". I ...

Are you sure he knows the difference? The Welsh word for patriot is "gwladgarwr" (my family came from Wales, but I was born in the USA), which comes from two words - "gwlad", which is "country" and "carwr" which means "one who loves". The point is that the idea that "patriotism" = "love one's country" is not unique to China. The same etymology exists in other, completely unrelated languages.

And where did you come across this idea that only a narrow range of topics can be discussed in Chinese classrooms? (Your choice of the term "bandwidth" shows a lack of understanding of the meaning of the term "bandwidth" - which refers to a volume of data per unit of time.) That certainly has not been my experience when teaching in China (and I do not teach English in China. I teach computer science).

It is not a logical assumption that the original poster sees any difference at all between the terms "patriotism" and "love one's country". There are terms that just do not translate well between languages. I say we should give the original poster the benefit of the doubt.

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Post time 2013-2-25 05:32:46 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-2-22 23:59
Your linguistic considerations were quite interesting but were they needed or were they designed t ...

Once again, you completely missed the point. I was pointing out that the Welsh word for "Patriotism" ALSO has its roots in the words "love" and "country", just like the Chinese word. The point was that it is NOT an uncommon etymology for that concept. My point was to show the SIMILARITY between two completely unrelated languages' interpretations of the concept of "patriotism" in order to show that the original poster's choice of the phrase "to love one's country" should not be surprising to anyone.

My protest of your misuse of the word bandwidth is because your use is simply incorrect. You cannot redefine words to suit your own pleasure. Neither can you redefine concepts to suit your biases. I don't know why I am bothering. You clearly have an agenda and you will not let anything like facts interfere with your pushing of your agenda.

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Post time 2013-2-25 05:33:00 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2013-2-22 23:59
Your linguistic considerations were quite interesting but were they needed or were they designed t ...

Once again, you completely missed the point. I was pointing out that the Welsh word for "Patriotism" ALSO has its roots in the words "love" and "country", just like the Chinese word. The point was that it is NOT an uncommon etymology for that concept. My point was to show the SIMILARITY between two completely unrelated languages' interpretations of the concept of "patriotism" in order to show that the original poster's choice of the phrase "to love one's country" should not be surprising to anyone.

My protest of your misuse of the word bandwidth is because your use is simply incorrect. You cannot redefine words to suit your own pleasure. Neither can you redefine concepts to suit your biases. I don't know why I am bothering. You clearly have an agenda and you will not let anything like facts interfere with your pushing of your agenda.

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