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“刘波很忙”何以走红中国互联网? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-7-11 13:31:10 |Display all floors

Source:WSJ
2012年 07月 10日 18:35




中国出了一个堪与美国的警官派克(John Pike)相匹敌的警察。

Sina Weibo


这幅用Photoshop处理过的图片显示,刘波正在追赶深受中国人喜爱的跨栏运动员刘翔。

去年“占领”运动进入高潮期间,中国网民不屑美国网民恶搞加州大学戴维斯分校(University of California, Davis)警官派克的水平,认为这只是业余水准。派克因向一群静坐示威的抗议者喷辣椒水而被人称作“喷辣椒水警察”(Pepper Spraying Cop),在网上一举成名。

但上周四川什邡爆发演变成暴力冲突的抗议活动之后,中国网民也用类似手段恶搞了一名“过分尽职”的防暴警察。这名警察对抗议者的攻击行为被形象地记录了下来,他本人也因此被视作政府暴行的象征。

这场抗议活动于本月早些时候爆发后不久,新浪微博上就开始流传一组照片。人们首先是从一队防暴警察中认出刘波的。在照片中,他用警棍指着抗议者,看上去很不高兴。刘波的腰围和那位大腹便便且令人难忘的“喷辣椒水警察”有得一拼。

后续的照片显示这名警察高举警棍追击一群抗议者的情况。这些抗议者背对着刘波,似乎并没有意识到他的“壮举”。在最后几张照片中,他驱散抗议人群,在其身后警察赶来前将一名女子打翻在地。

中国网民认定这名警察名叫刘波。他独自一人发起的这场“闪电战”不但遭到了潮水般批评,同时还让中国的恶搞机器开动了起来。中国微博用户把他辨识度最高的一张照片(照片中他低着头全力向前冲)嫁接到了各种各样的场景中。

Sina Weibo




过去几天,这轮以“刘波很忙”为标签的恶搞活动一直在网上流传。在一系列被恶搞过的场景中,有的显示这位胖同志搅乱一场职业足球赛,有的显示他穿越到最新一部《碟中谍》(Mission Impossible)电影中追逐汤姆•克鲁斯(Tom Cruise)。还有一张最绝,显示刘波在追击2004年奥运会110米栏金牌得主刘翔,而刘翔的表情看上去还真像吓坏了。

为刘波说好话的言论很难找到,大部分网民对他的态度不是公开敌视就是冷嘲热讽。

一位名叫“我兜里有棒棒糖”的微博用户说:垃圾,内战英雄。

而用户“来者不拒哦”则更加直接:(刘波)升官的日子不远了。

刘波是否会因为网友的恶搞而进入
中国互联网“万神殿”还有待观察。不过更加值得注意的是这样一个事实:他居然出现在了人们的谈话当中。在群体性事件发生之后,审查机关很少会允许民众公开嘲笑警察等国家权力的象征。

虽然很难知道政府为何会放任刘波“走红“,但从总体上来看,中国政府对网上有关什邡抗议活动的讨论显示出令人意外的宽容。中共官方报纸《人民日报》的旗下小报《环球时报》一篇社评或许能让人我们略知一二。

这篇社评认为重大事件和决策的信息不透明引发了政府的信任危机。社评直接将板子打在了地方政府的身上,迎合了多数中国人不相信地方政府、但认为中央政府有能力、有善意的情绪。社评说,地方政府做错了事,但吝于公开道歉,导致整个官方系统一起跟着为信誉损失埋单。

中央政府通过此举是不是在告诉地方政府,将来它们必须收拾自己的烂摊子?还是说这只是给予网民一个泄愤的机会?

无论中央的目的何在,刘波这样的人似乎都是不缺的。

Paul Mozur

Use magic tools Report

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Post time 2012-7-11 13:32:39 |Display all floors

Is This Guy the Chinese Version of Pepper Spraying Cop?


2012年 07月 10日 18:35





China might have found its answer to Lt. John Pike.

In the heyday of the Occupy movement last year, some Chinese Internet users dismissed as amateurish their U.S. counterparts佻 efforts to satirize Lt. Pike, the University of California, Davis police officer who became known across the Internet as Pepper Spraying Cop after blasting a group of seated protesters in the face with a can of pepper spray.

But in the wake of protests that turned violent last week in Shifang, Sichuan, China佻s online jesters have adopted similar tactics in mocking one overzealous riot cop whose well-documented assault on protestors has turned him into a symbol of government brutality.

In a sequence of photos that spread around Sina Corp.佻s Weibo microblogging service shortly after the protests broke out earlier this month, the policeman, whose girth matches that of the memorably paunchy Pepper Spraying Cop, is first seen in a line of riot police, pointing with his truncheon and looking disgruntled.

Pictures then show him charging, baton raised high, at a group of protestors who have their backs to him and are seemingly unaware of his brave assault. In the final photographs, he scatters the protestors and knocks over a woman before being joined by other police behind him.

The solo blitz earned the policeman, whom Chinese Internet users identified as Liu Bo, no shortage of criticism. It also fed China佻s meme machine, prompting the country佻s microbloggers to paste the most recognizable image of Mr. Liu, head ducked as he dramatically charges forward, into a whole variety of scenes.

The meme, which has been spreading over the past few days under the tagline Liu Bo is very busy,÷ show the corpulent comrade interrupting a professional football match, chasing Tom Cruise in the newest Mission Impossible film, and a house favorite closing in on 2004 Olympic gold-medal winning hurdler Liu Xiang (who looks genuinely terrified).

Comments defending Mr. Liu (the cop, not the hurdler) were hard to find, with users mostly split between open hostility and wry appraisals.

Trash, a civil war hero,÷ wrote one commenter posting under the handle My Pocket Has A Lollipop.

Another with the screen name Laizhebujue was more dry: The days of promotions [for Mr. Liu] aren佻t far away.÷

It remains to be seen whether Mr. Liu will enter the pantheon of legendary China Internet memes. More notable is the fact that he佻s even in the conversation at all: It佻s rare for censors to allow a symbol of state power like a policeman to be openly mocked following an incident of unrest.

Though it佻s hard to know just what the government is thinking in letting Mr. Liu佻s celebrity rise, the government has been surprisingly tolerant of online discussion of the Shifang protests in general. An editorial about Shifang published Monday by the Global Times, a tabloid published by the Communist Party mouthpiece newspaper People佻s Daily, may offer some insight.

Arguing that a lack of information about big events and decisions has created a crisis in confidence in the government, the editorial places the blame squarely on local governments, playing into the commonly understood trope that most Chinese distrust their local government but believe the central government is competent and well-meaning. When a local government mishandles a public affair, an apology is often absent in the aftermath of the emergency, dragging the whole official system down,÷ the editorial argued.

Are central authorities signaling to local governments that they will be forced the clean up their own messes in the future? Or are they simply providing Internet users with an opportunity to blow off steam?

There seems plenty of Mr. Liu to go around in either case.

Paul Mozur

Use magic tools Report

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