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Who is the world's best leader? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-2-1 10:58:31 |Display all floors
The Ambitious Newcomer: David Cameron

When David Cameron took office three months ago, Britain held its breath. The country's youngest prime minister in more than a century, untested in government, the 43-year-old inherited a fragile economy, an unpopular war, and a country fed up with politicians. But his drastic plans for tackling the budget deficit have soothed the markets, and his assured manner has impressed fellow heads of state--even in the European Union, normally tricky territory for a British Conservative. His calm managerial style also makes a welcome change at Downing Street after volatile predecessor Gordon Brown. As a result, Cameron's satisfaction rating among voters has climbed to almost 50 percent, and analysts across the political spectrum are hailing him for his daring: "He is showing himself as potentially the best all-round prime minister of the modern era," says Guardian columnist Martin Kettle. Britain can breathe easy, for now.
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:00:47 |Display all floors
2.The Green Guru: Mohamed Nasheed

As president of an island nation imperiled by rising sea levels, Mohamed Nasheed has become a hero among environmentalists. In the run-up to last year's United Nations climate-change meeting, Nasheed attracted global attention by hosting a cabinet meeting underwater. In Copenhagen, he shamed rich governments by pledging to make the Maldives the world's first carbon-neutral nation. Al Gore likes to quote him on the human cost of climate change. And in April, the U.N. elected him one of six "2010 Champions of the Earth." Achim Steiner, director of the U.N. Environment Program, praised Nasheed as a politician "who is showcasing to the rest of the world how a transition to climate neutrality can be achieved and how all nations, no matter how big or small, can contribute."
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:03:39 |Display all floors
3.The Man of the People: Wen Jiabao

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao has earned a reputation as a leader with a heart. Speaking with survivors of the massive 2008 Sichuan earthquake, Wen openly wept. In early August, his empathy was once again on display when he flew to the site of deadly floods in remote Gansu province and shouted encouragement to villagers trapped by the heavy rains. The premier has also dedicated himself to reducing the country's yawning rich-poor gap. No wonder ordinary Chinese seem truly fond of "Grandpa Wen."
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:05:24 |Display all floors
The Loved-Abroad-Hated-At-Home: Nicolas Sarkozy

French President Nicolas Sarkozy may be one of the world's great leaders, but at home his approval ratings are dismal. Intramural sniping and scandals plague his cabinet. Unemployment has topped 10 percent; economic recovery is anemic. But give Sarkozy the chance to perform on a bigger stage--heading the European Union, as he did in 2008, for instance--and suddenly he's right in his element. Back then he took the lead on everything from fighting Somali pirates to brokering an end to war between Russia and Georgia. Next year, Sarko will host both the G8 and G20, with Iran and the recession on his to-do list. He's expected to push for more regulation of financial markets and a new international monetary system. Once again, all the world will be his stage.
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:08:05 |Display all floors
The Fiscal Taskmaster: Brian Cowen

With Ireland's once-roaring economy staggered by the banking crisis--unemployment is at 13 percent, emigration is rising, and the money markets rank Ireland not far behind Greece on the list of Europe's big-time losers--Prime Minister Brian Cowen and his able finance minister, Brian Lenihan, are prescribing harsh medicine. They've pushed through austerity packages drastic enough to win the admiration of the international community, raised taxes, and slashed some public salaries by more than 10 percent. But the Irish aren't showing much gratitude--Cowen's ratings have plunged to a mere 18 percent, and his Fianna Fail party can expect a drubbing in the 2012 national elections. Still, there's some hope that his government's unpopular measures will be rewarded in the long run: surveys suggest that Irish consumer confidence is on the rise again, and the economy notched up modest growth in the first quarter of 2010.
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:09:22 |Display all floors
6.The Lion in Winter: Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva

As Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva prepares to leave office, he still enjoys rock-star status at home and red carpets abroad. Granted, Brazil was poised to rise before Lula's 2002 election. But the former union boss was wise enough to recognize business as an ally rather than an enemy. Under Lula, Brazil morphed from the developing world's chronic underachiever to an emerging-market powerhouse. With a stable economy, clean-burning biofuels, giant new oil fields, a rising middle class, and falling inequality, Brazil today seems to have it all. While some critics now claim glory has gone to Lula's head--citing his recent overtures to demagogues such as Hugo Chávez and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad--Lula has remained essentially a pragmatist, savvy enough not to gamble his country's newfound fortunes on a populist adventure. As a result, Brazil has soared on his watch. And in politics, that's all that counts.
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Post time 2012-2-1 11:11:22 |Display all floors
7.The CEO-in-Charge: Lee Myung-Bak

The global financial crisis provided a showcase for South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak's management skills. Drawing on his experience as a former Hyundai CEO, Lee guided Korea Inc. through the storm, slashing interest rates to historic lows, setting up funds to save troubled banks and companies, and striking currency-swap deals to secure dwindling foreign-currency reserves. The result: the fastest economic recovery among OECD nations, and forecasts of 5.8 percent growth in 2010 (the highest rate among developed economies). His talent will again be on display at the upcoming G20 summit in November in Seoul, which South Korea will host and chair. Given that the summit's main purpose is to prevent another global economic crisis, Lee's skills will surely be in high demand.
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