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Smell of the morning coffee, toast, eggs basted bacon & hashbrowns... [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-1-19 22:57:31 |Display all floors
This post was edited by edisonone at 2012-1-19 07:05


Since we can't risking nuking each other, my take on this is this:
it'll be collaborator meaning we give and take and we share the world's wealth -- peacefully -- for at least
100 years... And, knowing the Gringos, who knows where to from there...

It's a case of: If you can't beat them, join them.
And If you can't lick 'em, join 'em. Prov. If you have to give up fighting some group
because you can't win, band together with them.

{:soso_e151:}

I give up my little Yorkshire Terrier, or, if based on
[the latin 'nito" ending ]
, might you be one of those deadly Mexican Chihuahuas armed with
razor sharp Canines design to rip into the flesh instead?

{:soso_e113:}

Sino-American Relation: Rivals, Enemies or Collaborators?
2012-01-19 (China Military News cited from Middle East Online and by Immanuel Wallerstein) -- The relations of China and the United States are a major preoccupation of the chattering classes (bloggers, the media, politicians, international bureaucrats). The analysis is usually posed as the relation between the declining superpower, the United States, and the rapidly rising "emergent" country, China. In the western world...

"...the relation is usually
defined negatively, China being seen as a "threat." But threat to whom,
and in what sense?"

There are some who see China's "rise" as the resumption of a central position on the globe, a central position that they once held and are now resuming. There are some who see it as something very recent -- as China's new role in the shifting geopolitics and world-economic relations of the modern world-system.


Since the middle of the nineteenth century, the relations between the two countries have been ambiguous. On the one hand, in that era, the United States began to expand its trade routes to China. It began to send Christian missionaries. At the turn of the twentieth century, it proclaimed the Open Door Policy which was less directed against China than against other European powers. The United States wanted its share of the spoils. However, very shortly thereafter, it participated along with the other western countries in putting down the Boxer rebellion against imperialist outsiders. And back home in the United States, the US government (and the US trade unions) sought to prevent Chinese from immigrating to the United States.


On the other hand, there was a certain grudging respect for Chinese civilization. The Far East (China plus Japan) were the preferred locus for missionary work, placed above India and Africa, and justified on the assumption that China was a "higher" civilization. It may also have something to do with the fact that neither China nor Japan were directly colonized for the most part and that therefore there was no European colonial power to try to reserve its colonies for its own nationals as proselytizers.


After the Chinese revolution of 1911, Sun Yat-Sen, who had lived in the United States, became a sympathetic figure in US discourse. And by the time of the Second World War, China was seen as an ally in fighting Japan. Indeed, it was the United States that insisted that China receive a permanent seat on the Security Council of the United Nations. To be sure, when the Chinese Communist Party conquered mainland China and established the People's Republic of China (PRC), China and the United States seemed to become ferocious enemies. In the Korean War, they were on opposite sides, and it was the active military participation of China on the side of North Korea that ensured that the war would end in a deadlock.
Nonetheless, it was but a relatively short time later that Pres. Richard Nixon famously went to Beijing, met with Mao Zedong, and established a de facto alliance against the Soviet Union. The geopolitical world seemed to turn upside down. As part of the accord with the PRC, the United States broke its diplomatic relations with Taiwan (although it continued to stand guarantor against a PRC invasion across the straits). And when Deng Xiaoping became the leader of China, the country entered on a process of slowly opening to market operations and to integration in the trade currents of the capitalist world-economy.


While the collapse of the Soviet Union rendered irrelevant any Chinese-US alliance against it, the relations between the two countries did not really change. They became, if anything, much closer. The situation in which the world finds itself today is that China has a significant balance of payments surplus with the United States, much of which it invests in US Treasury bonds, thereby underwriting the ability of the US government to continue to spend vast amounts of resources on its multiple military activities around the globe (and particularly in the Middle East), as well as to be a good customer for Chinese exports.


From time to time, the rhetoric each government currently uses about the other is a bit harsh, but nowhere near the rhetoric of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. Still, it is never wise to pay too much attention to the rhetoric. In global affairs, rhetoric is usually intended primarily to have a political effect within one's own countries, rather than reflecting true policy towards the country at which it is ostensibly aimed.





Putin's a killer. This was the claim made by Fox News journalist; Bill O'Reilly during his recent interview with Donald Trump. Trump's reply came in the form of a simple question. What, you think our country's so innocent?

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Post time 2012-1-20 03:07:05 |Display all floors
The U.S. should get on China's good side more and more in the future as China rises. Less risks for conflict that way.
Put out your right arm, hold back your left arm... <(=^.^=);

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Post time 2012-1-20 05:10:09 |Display all floors
Bacon is linked to the most vicious pancreatic cancer.

The fat guy loved by the Sinophobic West.

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Post time 2012-1-20 05:11:24 |Display all floors
Processed meat linked to cancer: http://bbs.chinadaily.com.cn/thread-727808-1-1.html

The fat guy loved by the Sinophobic West.

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Post time 2012-1-20 06:29:47 |Display all floors
edisonone  chinese sausage? chinese bacon? chinese salted fish? duck eggs? century eggs? tofu cured in salt brime? shrimp paste? the list goes on and on... moderation thus is the key... can't avoid red meat...

Yes, all those delicacies are bad. Many Chinese have cut on their consumption.

The fat guy loved by the Sinophobic West.

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Post time 2012-1-20 08:36:40 |Display all floors
CVHuan Post time: 2012-1-20 02:07
The U.S. should get on China's good side more and more in the future as China rises. Less risks for  ...

They should be on each others' good side and China should stop issuing warnings all the time. They're not worth the hot air that goes along with them.

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Post time 2012-1-20 09:44:32 |Display all floors
lebeast Post time 2012-1-20 07:35  timbatu does not understand science.

LOL, I am sorry you are so proud of your bacon. Bacon is linked to cancer - this is the title of your beloved BBC news. Of course, only whites are allowed to say it without irritating you. You define a brainless racist.

The fat guy loved by the Sinophobic West.

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