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Yellow River photos - Bitter Waters [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2011-12-22 15:01:26 |Display all floors
A crisis is brewing in China's northern heartland as its lifeline, the Yellow River, succumbs to pollution and overuse.

Water fouled by a fertilizer factory in Inner Mongolia steams as it seeps toward the upper reaches of the Yellow River.
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:05:23 |Display all floors
With so much water diverted for irrigation and industry, the Yellow River ran dry before reaching its terminus—the Bo Hai sea—in all but one year during the 1990s.
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:05:56 |Display all floors
Largest city on the Yellow River, Lanzhou is also among China's most polluted urban areas. During the past 2,500 years the waterway has overflowed and changed course more than 1,500 times, earning it the epithet "China's Sorrow."
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:07:06 |Display all floors
Outside a restaurant in Taian, waiters-in-training hold trays loaded with waterfilled beer bottles. Workers migrate here from rural areas, where jobs are disappearing along with the fresh water supply.
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:08:02 |Display all floors
The drive to consume clouds the road ahead in Liulin, where a coalfired power plant helps fuel an energy-hungry China. Environmentalists say that greenhouse gases are contributing to the death of the Yellow River, but economists warn that a slowdown in China could lead to political instability—even chaos.
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:08:35 |Display all floors
"When the Yellow River is at peace, China is at peace." So says the message on the Sanmenxia Dam, completed in 1960 to help stop chronic flooding. Instead, it slowed the river's current, increasing siltation—and flooding. The only way to fix the dam, says one of its original engineers, is to blow it up.
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Post time 2011-12-22 15:09:01 |Display all floors
On an arid expanse of the Loess Plateau, farmer Ren Guibao trudges uphill with cornstalks he'll burn as fuel. Rare rains wash the loose yellow soil down gullies to the river, tinting the water its namesake color. Sediments choke some stretches of the Yellow, hindering its ability to flush out pollutants.
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