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China presses US on high-tech exports cap [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2011-5-11 06:48:54 |Display all floors
WASHINGTON - Many American firms have lost business opportunities and market share in China as a result of US government imposing control on high-tech exports to China.

"It is not fair for China and for US businesses," Minister of Commerce Chen Deming told the media on Monday on the sideline of the 3rd Strategic and Economic Dialogue.

The US has imposed restrictions on more than 2,000 items to be exported to China, with mandatory requirement to clarify end-user and end-use in China before these American manufacturers can export these items to China, Chen explained.

The US has further excluded China from a list of 164 countries whom it granted its new license exception called Strategic Trade Authorization, Chen said.

Such exclusion does not agree with the consensus that Chinese President Hu Jin-tao and US President Barack Obama agreed to in January to forge a "new relationship", open a "new position" and give a "new strength" to China-US relationship, Chen said.

[ Last edited by 468259058 at 2011-5-11 06:51 AM ]
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Post time 2011-5-11 06:52:05 |Display all floors
We have to type the president of China as Hu  Jin-tao.

a dash -  ....
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Post time 2011-5-11 06:52:40 |Display all floors
source: h ttp://w ww.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2011sinousdialogue/2011-05/10/content_12475611.htm
Updated: 2011-05-10 03:29
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Post time 2011-5-11 06:59:16 |Display all floors

China Urges U.S. To Balance Trade By Allowing More High Tech Exports

WASHINGTON (AP) -- China is using high-level meetings to urge the United States to allow more technology exports into the booming Chinese economy as a way of balancing trade.

The United States, meanwhile, has criticized the communist-led nation's latest crackdown on democracy advocates, arguing that long-term stability depends on respecting human rights.

Both sides issued familiar grievances at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue, which began in Washington on Monday, but they took pains to stress a generally positive track in relations between the two economic superpowers.

State Councilor Dai Bingguo said common interests between the world's two largest economies now make them "inseparable" and destined to grow more interdependent.

The annual two-day round of talks brings together leaders on economics, foreign policy and security. The meetings, involving scores of officials, wrap up Tuesday with news conferences.

President Barack Obama met Dai and Chinese delegation leader Vice Premier Wang Qishan after Monday's deliberations. He encouraged China to implement policies to support "balanced global growth as well as a more balanced bilateral economic relationship." On human rights, he underscored his support for freedom of expression and political participation, a White House statement said.

This year's dialogue follows a January state visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao that helped eased tensions over the U.S. arms sales to self-governing Taiwan, which Beijing regards as part of Chinese territory. The U.S. and China also have been at odds over China's intervention in currency markets, which the U.S. says has kept the value of the yuan low against the dollar, giving an unfair advantage to Chinese exporters.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Monday softened the long-standing U.S. criticism of China's economic policies, possibly in a belief that the outside pressure was proving counterproductive.

Geithner praised China's efforts, which include a decision last June to resume allowing the yuan to rise in value against the dollar after freezing the currency's value for two years during the height of the financial crisis. The yuan has risen by about 5 percent against the dollar since last summer. American manufacturers contend the yuan is still undervalued by as much as 40 percent.

The U.S. Treasury chief still urged China to allow its currency to appreciate at a faster rate and to allow Chinese consumer interest rates to rise. Both steps could help boost domestic demand and help lower America's trade deficit, which hit an all-time high with China last year.

A Chinese official, however, blamed U.S. policies for the ballooning trade gap. Commerce Minister Chen Deming told a news conference that China's currency appreciation was being carried out in a "very healthy manner." He said the United States needed to change its own policies on high-tech sales and investment as a way to spur American manufacturing.

He took aim at the U.S. screening of Chinese foreign investment proposals, contending it was neither fair nor China Urges U.S. To Balance Trade By Allowing More High Tech Exports

WASHINGTON (AP) -- China is using high-level meetings to urge the United States to allow more technology exports into the booming Chinese economy as a way of balancing trade.

The United States, meanwhile, has criticized the communist-led nation's latest crackdown on democracy advocates, arguing that long-term stability depends on respecting human rights.

Both sides issued familiar grievances at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue, which began in Washington on Monday, but they took pains to stress a generally positive track in relations between the two economic superpowers.

State Councilor Dai Bingguo said common interests between the world's two largest economies now make them "inseparable" and destined to grow more interdependent.

The annual two-day round of talks brings together leaders on economics, foreign policy and security. The meetings, involving scores of officials, wrap up Tuesday with news conferences.

President Barack Obama met Dai and Chinese delegation leader Vice Premier Wang Qishan after Monday's deliberations. He encouraged China to implement policies to support "balanced global growth as well as a more balanced bilateral economic relationship." On human rights, he underscored his support for freedom of expression and political participation, a White House statement said.

This year's dialogue follows a January state visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao that helped eased tensions over the U.S. arms sales to self-governing Taiwan, which Beijing regards as part of Chinese territory. The U.S. and China also have been at odds over China's intervention in currency markets, which the U.S. says has kept the value of the yuan low against the dollar, giving an unfair advantage to Chinese exporters.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Monday softened the long-standing U.S. criticism of China's economic policies, possibly in a belief that the outside pressure was proving counterproductive.

Geithner praised China's efforts, which include a decision last June to resume allowing the yuan to rise in value against the dollar after freezing the currency's value for two years during the height of the financial crisis. The yuan has risen by about 5 percent against the dollar since last summer. American manufacturers contend the yuan is still undervalued by as much as 40 percent.

The U.S. Treasury chief still urged China to allow its currency to appreciate at a faster rate and to allow Chinese consumer interest rates to rise. Both steps could help boost domestic demand and help lower America's trade deficit, which hit an all-time high with China last year.

A Chinese official, however, blamed U.S. policies for the ballooning trade gap. Commerce Minister Chen Deming told a news conference that China's currency appreciation was being carried out in a "very healthy manner." He said the United States needed to change its own policies on high-tech sales and investment as a way to spur American manufacturing.

He took aim at the U.S. screening of Chinese foreign investment proposals, contending it was neither fair nor transparent. Most recently, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States rejected a takeover by private Chinese technology giant Huawei of a small U.S. computer company, 3Leaf, on national security grounds.

"We hope the United States can treat Chinese investment, including by state-owned enterprises, in a fair manner," he said.

U.S. companies have their own long list of complaints: limited access to Chinese markets, theft of intellectual property, widespread use in China of counterfeit software and problems in seeking redress through China's legal system.

At the ceremonial opening of the talks on Monday, Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton offered blunt criticism of China's human rights record, which Beijing regards as an internal matter. Clinton later had "very candid and honest" private discussions on the issue with Dai, U.S. officials said.

Since February, Chinese authorities have questioned or detained hundreds of lawyers, activists, journalists and bloggers after anonymous calls were made on the Internet for protests emulating those that have challenged and toppled authoritarian governments in the Middle East and North Africa. No such protests have taken place in China.

"We know over the long arc of history that societies that work toward respecting human rights are going to be more prosperous, stable and successful. That has certainly been proven time and time again, but most particularly in the last months," Clinton said.

Dai said China had made progress in the area of human rights, but he did not mention the recent crackdown.

In Beijing on Tuesday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said, "No country is perfect in its human rights record and there is no one-size-fits-all human rights policy."

In unusually mild comments on a subject that Beijing is highly sensitive about, Jiang said, "China and the U.S. have different opinions in the area of human rights and we believe we can use dialogue to increase mutual understanding and mutual trust."

This year's talks for the first time included high-level military leaders from both nations, a move seen as a way to increase understanding between military commanders and reduce the risk of conflict. China's military has expanded rapidly in the past 15 years, deploying missiles and naval assets that could challenge American supremacy in the region.
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Post time 2011-5-11 06:59:45 |Display all floors

China Urges U.S. To Balance Trade By Allowing More High Tech Exports

Another one news report didn't show up.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- China is using high-level meetings to urge the United States to allow more technology exports into the booming Chinese economy as a way of balancing trade.

The United States, meanwhile, has criticized the communist-led nation's latest crackdown on democracy advocates, arguing that long-term stability depends on respecting human rights.




source:
h ttp://w ww.huffingtonpost.com/2011/05/10/china-us-high-tech-exports-export_n_859791.html

[ Last edited by 468259058 at 2011-5-11 07:02 AM ]
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Post time 2011-5-11 07:17:57 |Display all floors
I don't understand.

What kind of items?  What exactly are we talking about here?

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Post time 2011-5-11 08:02:06 |Display all floors
US considers new export restrictions on China
(chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2005-07-29 13:53


The Bush administration is going to impose stricter restrictions on exporting American technologies and products to China, as Washington is getting increasingly nervous about non-stop Chinese rises on the world stage.

The U.S. Commerce Department is reportedly preparing to issue rules by the end of 2005, that would impose stricter limits on exports of American civilian technology that, allegedly, also has military uses. They include semiconductors made by Intel, chip-making equipment sold by Advanced Micro Devices, planes made by Boeing, aircraft parts from Honeywell International and machine tools made by companies like Gleason, according to U.S. Commerce Department documents.

Currently, only 1.5 percent of the $35 billion in U.S. exports to China requires a government export license, the department says. Depending on how the new rules are structured, U.S. industry lobbyists say, the proportion could grow to more than 10 percent.

World leading chip maker Intel Corp has reported that its Asia operations lead global sales growth. China alone accounted for about $5 billion of the company's $34 billion company revenue last year. Intel has 5,000 employees in China and has invested $1.3 billion in design centers, laboratories and factories there.

"We're living in a world where technology has become a commodity," Jennifer Greeson, an Intel spokeswoman, said. "Restricting access to markets would have a pretty significant impact on the U.S. technology sector."

Boeing, which this year won orders from Chinese airlines for 60 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets, said in June that it would use about $600 million in parts from Chinese companies.

The Bush Administration is still debating the details of the new regulations, and an intense lobbying campaign is being waged to influence the outcome, Bloomberg reported.

Business groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Aerospace Industries Association have been trying to limit any new restrictions.

Pat McCartan, director of legislative affairs for the aerospace group, said that while "we don't want to supply the Chinese military," the changes being considered by the administration and the U.S. Congress "would slow our exports to China.

As China intends to embrace for more imports from America to balance the trade sheet, which now is in China’s favor, the Bush Administration and U.S. Congress have increased efforts to lay more barriers, amid a growing conservative voice in Washington which alleges a rising China hurts American national security, Chinese analysts said.
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