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Do Tibetans Consider themselves Chinese? [Copy link] 中文

Post time 2011-3-17 02:30:04 |Display all floors
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Post time 2011-3-17 08:28:08 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2011-3-16 10:52


We don't have an "official" language in Australia, you fool.

The major spoken language here is English, with Chinese language/s in second place (and I suspect most ...

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How could a European language became major language in a Pacific island, birdie?

Because your European dumped convicts beheaded the natives and move their leaders head far away from Australia.

I must admit you have very effective means. Behead those against you and then occupy their land.
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ ... s-severed-head.html

Aborigines to ask Prince William to return warrior’s severed head

Australian Aborigines plan to ask Prince William for help finding and returning the head of an indigenous warrior who was killed and decapitated by British soldiers more than 200 years ago.

Michael Mundine: Elder Michael Mundine of the Aboriginal Housing Company said he believed the Prince 'has his mother?s heart' and would understand his request Photo: AFPBy Bonnie Malkin in Sydney 4:44PM GMT 15 Jan 2010
Prince William will visit Australia for three days next week, after an official trip to New Zealand. It will be the first time the Prince has set foot in Australia since visiting as a baby with his parents in 1983.

Elder Michael Mundine of the Aboriginal Housing Company said he believed the Prince “has his mother’s heart” and would understand his request to recover the remains of the warrior Pemulwuy.

Pemulwuy was shot dead in 1802, 14 years after the arrival of the First Fleet, and his head was sent to England in a glass jar.

Many believe the head is still in England with the remains of an estimated 3000 indigenous people whose body parts were bottled in the name of scientific research. However, the exact location of the jar and its contents remains a mystery.

When it first arrived in England, the skull was reportedly kept at the Royal College of Surgeons in London, and later may have been moved to the Natural History Museum. However, the museum has no record of it.

Now, Aboriginal leaders want to recover his remains, and the remains of other aborigines killed and collected by the British during colonisation, so that they can be given a proper burial in their native country.

“He is from a different generation and, because he is young, I think he will understand that Pemulwuy needs to come home to his lands,” Mr Mundine, who is one of five indigenous people chosen to meet the Prince next week, told The Australian newspaper.

The return of Aboriginal remains is an important issue for indigenous Australians who are lobbying British museums for their repatriation.

Rob Welsh, who chairs the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, said he was concerned about “the remains of all our ancestors”.

Mr Welsh, said he, too, believed the late Princess Diana had raised her son “to be respectful, and to understand what is important to our people”.

Pemulwuy, who was born around 1750, opposed the British settlement and was described by Sydney’s then Governor Philip King as “a terrible pest to the colony” but also “a brave and independent character”.

He was one of the Eora people, whose land – now known as the suburb of Botany Bay in Sydney’s south – was directly affected by the arrival of the British. In response, Pemulwuy fiercely resisted, using fire to destroy crops and animals and regularly mounting raids on early settlements.

Referred to as “the rainbow warrior” because of his brightly coloured clothes, he had more than 100 followers and at one point was accused of spearing Governor Arthur Phillip’s gamekeeper. But his exploits incurred the wrath of the British, and he was shot dead on the orders of Governor Philip King in 1802.

According to the Australian Dictionary of Biography, King wrote to Joseph Banks in London: “Understanding that the possession of a New Hollander’s head is among the desiderata, I have put it in spirits and forwarded it by the Speedy”, but the head has not been found in an English repository of Aboriginal remains.

Some believe Pemulwuy’s skull was bottled and returned to Australia in 1950, and then lost.

But most, including Mr Mundine and Mr Welsh, believe the warrior’s head is still in England, alongside the remains of many other indigenous people.

During two days in Sydney, the Prince’s itinerary includes visits to an Aboriginal community centre and an Australian army base.

On the tour’s last day in Melbourne on Thursday, the prince will be visiting nearby rural areas devastated by fire in February last year in Australia’s worst natural disaster of modern times.

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Post time 2011-3-17 08:28:35 |Display all floors
Originally posted by dragonlover at 2011-3-17 02:01


When did they do that?

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Since the 5th Dalai Lama.

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