Author: treaty2

Honor the Treaties [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-3-30 20:27:03 |Display all floors

Reply #56 seneca's post

Uighurs have been ordered by the Party to write in Arabic


You should give serious consideration that the decision is made by Ui ghurs themselves.

If I am "the Party", I will "order" them to write in Latin scripts.  It will be then easier for them to learn hanyu pinyin and English.

Also, the Quran is written in Arabic.  As "the Party", it is to my advantage that the Ui ghurs distance themselves from the Quran -- according to some Western theorists and Da lai Lama -type theorists that China is engaging in "cultural genocide" or out to "annihilate" Buddhism/Islam.  

For Han-Chinese nationalists, it is to their nationality advantage that Ui ghurs distance themselves from the Turks or Turkists in Arabic lands.  

Therefore, Arabic scripts should be abandoned.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-3-30 20:35:00 |Display all floors

Mongolian_writing_systems

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_writing_systems

More.

Many Mongolian writing systems have been devised over the centuries. The number of scripts dedicated to the Mongolian language is matched by few other tongues.

The oldest has also been the most successful one, and still in active use today. Others have been developed either as attempts to fix its perceived shortcomings, or to allow the notation of other languages as well, most often Sanskrit and Tibetan. In the 20th century, Mongolia chose a Cyrillic script to be more compatible with the Soviet Union, its political ally of the time. Mongolians in Inner Mongolia, on the other hand, still use the traditional Mongolian script.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-4-5 10:33:23 |Display all floors

Reply #66 seneca's post

How can YOU say that? You are talking with a forked tongue!


You mean tongue-in-cheek?
I don't know how to "fork" my tongue.
But I think I can do with a tongue in the cheek.

Since the Uis devised the Mongolian script it stands to reason that they had a script of their own until some time ago when Arabic replaced it.


We have spoken about this before.  Ui have many scripts.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uighur_language

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyghur_alphabet

5th to 19th century
[Forgotten scripts]
20th to 21th century
The writing of Uyghur saw many changes during the 20th century mostly to do political decisions, both from Soviet and Chinese side. The Soviet Union first tried to romanize the writing of the language, but soon after decided to promote a Cyrillic-derived alphabet during the late 1920s, known as Uyghur Siril Yéziqi, fearing that a romanization of the language would strengthen the relationship of the Uyghur people to other Turkic peoples.

With the proclamation of the People's Republic of China in 1949 and change to communism, the promotion of a Cyrillic-derived alphabet also began, but when the tensions between the Soviet Union and China grew bigger during the late 1950s, the Chinese devised a new alphabet based upon Pinyin, which is known as Uyghur Pinyin Yéziqi, and promoted this instead, and which soon became the official alphabet of usage.

Due to the unpopularity of the Pinyin-based alphabet, the Arabic-derived alphabet was reinstalled, although in a new modified form, which came to be known as Uyghur Ereb Yéziqi. However, due to the increasing importance of information technology, there has been requests for a Latin-derived alphabet, for easier use on computers. This resulted in five conferences between 2000 and 2001, where a Latin-derived alphabet was devised, known as Uyghur Latin Yéziqi, which however hasn't been widely accepted.[3]

Present situation
Today the Uyghur language is being written using four different alphabets.

Uyghur Ereb Yéziqi or UEY
Uyghur Latin Yéziqi or ULY
Uyghur Siril Yéziqi or USY
Uyghur Pinyin Yéziqi or UPNY

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-4-5 10:43:43 |Display all floors

Computer and languages

due to the increasing importance of information technology, there has been requests for a Latin-derived alphabet, for easier use on computers. This resulted in five conferences between 2000 and 2001, where a Latin-derived alphabet was devised, known as Uyghur Latin Yéziqi, which however hasn't been widely accepted.[3]


Seneca,

You may not be aware, there was  a time when Chinese linguists proposed using Latin script for Han-Chinese language.  I still remember seeing Chinese language textbooks printed totally in hanyu pinyin, without Chinese characters.  There was this concern about Chinese character input into the computer system, which seemed to be a very formidable challenge.

But with power processor chips and software nowadays, hanyu pinyin has become the preferred choice for input, while the output is automatically converted to Chinese characters.

And I don't understand why Latin-derived alphabet "hasn't been widely accepted".

Use magic tools Report

Post time 2010-4-8 11:43:57 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-4-9 11:48:55 |Display all floors
Originally posted by seneca at 2010-4-5 19:15
I hope you, Matthew, have now accepted my claim that the Uis had no hand in deciding upon the script for their language. Imagine changing the script of your mother tongue two times in two gener ...


You have biased way of interpreting what you read.  Always.

Han Chinese are learning English.  Why?

And why would the Ui adopt the Cyrillic script if Soviet Union's influence was on the decline in China? Afterall the Cyrillic was not "indigeneous" to them, and was introduced only after 1949.

Chinese "introduced" pinyin.  Not popular.  Did China insist on it?

It was experimental.  Just like Romanising Chinese.

there has been requests for a Latin-derived alphabet, for easier use on computers. This resulted in five conferences


Who do you think requested it?

And five conferences were held.  And you jumped to conclusion that the Ui's were not involved?  Yet you dare say Chinese do not learn Ui language.  How on earth is this possible that Ui-illiterate Chinese participate in five conferences?

And five conferences were held.  Not popular.  Probably the problem has not been resolved to the satisfaction of the Ui.

The Mongolians in China used their traditional language. The Mongolians in Mongolia abandoned it because of Soviet influence.  That tells a story, isn't it?

[ Last edited by matthew5_3 at 2010-4-9 11:59 AM ]

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-4-11 05:25:11 |Display all floors

Reply #68 seneca's post

#58 matthew5_3's post

So the Mongolians in China keep their traditional scripts, unlike those in Mongolia who have to experiment with Soviet and Latin scripts.   And yet, Han-Chinese are accused of not keeping (?) the Mongolian language???


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_language

Writing systems
Main article: Mongolian writing systems
Mongolian has been written in a variety of alphabets. The traditional Mongolian script was adapted from Uyghur script probably at the very beginning of the 13th century and from that time underwent some minor disambiguations and supplementations. Between 1930 and 1932, a short-lived attempt was made to introduce the Latin script in the Mongolian state, and after a preparatory phase, the Mongolian Cyrillic script was declared mandatory by government decree. From 1991 to 1994, an attempt at reintroducing the traditional alphabet failed in the face of popular resistance.[87] In informal contexts of electronic text production, the use of the Latin alphabet is common.[88]

In the People's Republic of China, Mongolian is a co-official language with Mandarin Chinese in some regions, notably the entire Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The traditional alphabet has always been used there, although Cyrillic was considered briefly before the Sino-Soviet split.[89] There are two types of written Mongolian used in China: the traditional Mongolian script, which is official among Mongols nationwide, and the Clear script, used predominantly among Oirats in Xinjiang.[90]

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.