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Exit Spielberg, stage left [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-3-5 14:40:05 |Display all floors
Spielberg denounced for making misjudgment  


www.chinaview.cn  2008-03-05 11:37:10      Print

Special report:   2008 Olympic Games

    BEIJING, March 5 (Xinhua) -- In an article written recently, Mrs. Louise Blouin MacBain, founder and chairwoman of the Global Creative Leadership Summit, repudiated film director Steven Spielberg for connecting the Darfur Issue with 2008 Beijing Olympics.

    Blouin MacBain, also a renowned publisher, said that Spielberg's act was both "unfair and unsound."

    The famous Hollywood director Spielberg publicly announced his resignation as an artistic director for the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on the grounds of a clash of "conscience."

    She said, "China called upon Khartoum to allow a joint UN, African Union peacekeeping force into the region, and for greater cooperation from both the Sudanese government and anti-government forces with the international community to resolve the crisis."

    Furthermore, China has also agreed with U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to resuming broader talks with U.S. and EU partners on human rights.

    She added that these actions could be regarded as very active moves, which were advancing in a correct direction.

    "I disagree with Spielberg for singling out China as the only culprit in the conflict and for the strong tactics that he has used. This approach is both unfair and unsound," said MacBain..

    Spielberg's approach is unfair since while China does have financial interests in the region, yet it has only limited authority over Khartoum. Over the past months China has actually been pressing the Sudanese government to do more to end the conflict.

    In addition, the United States and European Union have been unwilling to intervene in the region over the past five years. However, the United States has had greater diplomatic sway, so it should have more involvement in the region than any other nation.

    It is unsound, since there are other atrocities and political battles that he could be more effectively campaigning against. These include American foreign policy in Iraq, detainee rights in Guantanamo Bay, the use of water-boarding as an interrogation technique by the U.S. Military or the lackluster motivation by the U.S. trade representatives to finalize the Doha Round trade agreement.

    MacBain said the situation in Darfur is indeed dramatic and unjust, noting: "However, we have to ask: What have broader American policies achieved in Africa over the last decade? While the Bush administration deserves credit for allocating 9 billion U.S. dollars to be invested in development and humanitarian aid, little has been done to structurally alter African economies -- enabling them to become more independent--or African governance, facilitating the Rule of Law and social justice."

    She added: " We have to stop pointing fingers at other nations, making symbolic and hurtful gestures, while not looking first at our own governments, our own policies and our own national ethos.

    She went on to say: "We cannot continue to judge without the expectation of being judged back, or in this case, to further alienate China from engagement in meaningful multilateral peace talks for the region."

    "What is more important for us," MacBain said, "is to remember how much China has accomplished over this period, and that while there is much more we should ask of China on the international stage, we also have to recognize that the harmonization of Chinese foreign policy with the traditions and principles of the West is an incremental process."

    "China in its development needs to be patiently supported, and in this support we will find willing partners to solve a number of these pressing global problems," she said.

    "We all have skeletons in our closets and we have to resist the urge to point fingers," she added.

    "I, for one, will be in attendance to celebrate the Beijing 2008 Olympics. I hope to see you (Spielberg) there, too," MacBain said in conclusion.

    Mrs. Louise Blouin MacBain owns 80 companies worldwide, publishes 60 magazines, and operates more than 400 kinds of publications and 60 websites in 20-plus countries.

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Post time 2008-3-5 18:25:50 |Display all floors

Amateur Hour .

Dear correction ,

Thank you for the link . This puts paid to this juvenile tantrum that was performed by Spielberg . The world is savvy enough to know right from wrong and most people realize that folks like Mia Farrow are the hoods behind the scam.  

I bet he is regretting the invites and free tickets to the VIP lounge . Wish I can make myself up to look like to Jew and pretend to be the repentant SS . ( Steven Spielberg ).

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Post time 2008-3-5 20:26:36 |Display all floors

subject is CLOSED...

Spielberg denounced for making misjudgment
(Xinhua)
Updated: 2008-03-05 12:03


In an article written recently, Mrs. Louise Blouin MacBain, founder and chairwoman of the Global Creative Leadership Summit, repudiated film director Steven Spielberg for connecting the Darfur Issue with 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Blouin MacBain, also a renowned publisher, said that Spielberg's act was both "unfair and unsound."

The famous Hollywood director Spielberg publicly announced his resignation as an artistic director for the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on the grounds of a clash of "conscience."

She said, "China called upon Khartoum to allow a joint UN, African Union peacekeeping force into the region, and for greater cooperation from both the Sudanese government and anti-government forces with the international community to resolve the crisis."

Furthermore, China has also agreed with U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to resuming broader talks with U.S. and EU partners on human rights.

She added that these actions could be regarded as very active moves, which were advancing in a correct direction.

"I disagree with Spielberg for singling out China as the only culprit in the conflict and for the strong tactics that he has used. This approach is both unfair and unsound," said MacBain..

Spielberg's approach is unfair since while China does have financial interests in the region, yet it has only limited authority over Khartoum. Over the past months China has actually been pressing the Sudanese government to do more to end the conflict.

In addition, the United States and European Union have been unwilling to intervene in the region over the past five years. However, the United States has had greater diplomatic sway, so it should have more involvement in the region than any other nation.

It is unsound, since there are other atrocities and political battles that he could be more effectively campaigning against. These include American foreign policy in Iraq, detainee rights in Guantanamo Bay, the use of water-boarding as an interrogation technique by the U.S. Military or the lackluster motivation by the U.S. trade representatives to finalize the Doha Round trade agreement.

MacBain said the situation in Darfur is indeed dramatic and unjust, noting: "However, we have to ask: What have broader American policies achieved in Africa over the last decade? While the Bush administration deserves credit for allocating 9 billion U.S. dollars to be invested in development and humanitarian aid, little has been done to structurally alter African economies -- enabling them to become more independent--or African governance, facilitating the Rule of Law and social justice."

She added: " We have to stop pointing fingers at other nations, making symbolic and hurtful gestures, while not looking first at our own governments, our own policies and our own national ethos.

She went on to say: "We cannot continue to judge without the expectation of being judged back, or in this case, to further alienate China from engagement in meaningful multilateral peace talks for the region."

"What is more important for us," MacBain said, "is to remember how much China has accomplished over this period, and that while there is much more we should ask of China on the international stage, we also have to recognize that the harmonization of Chinese foreign policy with the traditions and principles of the West is an incremental process."

"China in its development needs to be patiently supported, and in this support we will find willing partners to solve a number of these pressing global problems," she said.

"We all have skeletons in our closets and we have to resist the urge to point fingers," she added.

"I, for one, will be in attendance to celebrate the Beijing 2008 Olympics. I hope to see you (Spielberg) there, too," MacBain said in conclusion.

Mrs. Louise Blouin MacBain owns 80 companies worldwide, publishes 60 magazines, and operates more than 400 kinds of publications and 60 websites in 20-plus countries.

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Post time 2008-3-6 14:20:02 |Display all floors
>"The subject is closed..."

Regarding Spielberg, maybe. But it would be erroneous to blame him for all the anti-China propaganda. Spielberg's just a symptom, not the disease, which lies in the West's ingrained hostility against any country that doesn't obey their dictat. Even tiny Cuba couldn't escape attacks - nor invasion or subversions - just because it wanted to do things its own way. Dozens other Third World nations had suffered the same fate, from the mining of Nicaragua's harbor to the assassination of Chile's Allende, from the coup detat of Iran's Mossadeq to the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. Panama was a US client state until Noreiga decided to ignore his former American master, thus "necessitating" an invasion that killed thousands of Panamanian civilians and ended up with that country's President being jailed in -- Miami!!!

What is to be done? Anti-Chinese propaganda isn't going away until the West divide and control China the way they did before 1950. Their preference, of course, is that the Chinese do it to themselves.  Hence the West will praise China for actions that weaken the Chinese state, and condemn China for anything that serves to strengthen the Chinese nation.

The solution seems obvious, and indeed it has been attempted in the past: China must, together with as many other Asian nations as possible, provide an alternative international media. This had not been possible because Asian nations often succumb to the West's tactic of divide and rule. What's worse is that there are signs that even the Chinese media have been overly-influenced by Western media both in terms of terminology, selection of news, and ideological framework (only a brain-dead hack could think that there's such a thing as ideologically neutral news). It's not surprising that Britney Spear's pregnancy takes more space in some online Chinese paper than, say, the use of poisonous depleted uranium in Iraq.

It's still not too late for China to re-orientate its news reportage to reflect reality that's unmediated by Western propaganda. We should not feel obliged to treat as "issues" anything the West regard as "issues," or disregard issues that the West think should be left unspoken.  It's time for China to be truly independent in news gathering and dissemination from China's standpoint, and possibily Asia's standpoint as well. Lincoln once talked about the need to take unpopular actions, something that China must do even if it means weeding out those unable to see the long term interests of the nation. The West in particular would be aghast, and we can expect more diatribes from them. Let them howl. We're not "free" if our minds are colonized by Western media imperialism.

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Post time 2008-3-6 15:14:53 |Display all floors

The Megaphone War .

# 209,

Dear georgeh ,

A brilliant idea . We must have our own megaphones to broadcast our points of view , like Al Jazeera & Al Arabia . The Asians have 3 billion people and half the world's economic clout . Why are you so shy and coy about getting into the same arm wrestling game of propaganda as the indolent West has been doing all these decades ?

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Post time 2008-3-6 18:25:03 |Display all floors
Quote: " In April, Spielberg wrote a letter to the Chinese president, Hu Jintao, calling on China to take firm action to stop the violence in Sudan, but received no response to his request for a meeting   "


...........but received no response to his request for a meeting  .  

Good, that is way to go from Hu.
Over the years, a lot of  Western activists wrote to Hu .  Do  these ordinary nuts expect president Hu
to meet and talk to them ?  Hu has a lot of more important matters to take  care of.

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Post time 2008-3-6 19:00:32 |Display all floors
Hi Mengzi:
Part of the reason is that much of the power has been given to certain people who'd gone to the West for tertiary education. Some of these Chinese, especially the scientists, did learn much to benefit the nation. But a lot have gone there just to get a degree - a piece of paper that sometimes don't reflect what they ought to know. And many Western universities are quite happy to please the Chinese students, or to stuff important Chinese institutions with highly credentialed but poorly trained or educated individuals.

We see evidence of this when officials talk about the "market economy" as if it's hard science, as if it's some natural law like the law of gravity. These people have fallen into what is known as "market fundamentalism" - a belief system that's as doctrinaire, as dogmatic, as any other kind of religious, social, or political beliefs. In order to defend pure capitalism, the kind that Einstein abhorred, one writer even cooked up a story about how a group of peasants got together to give up collectivism and became rich as a result. This kind of melodramatic argument can fool only the half-educated, for with every such instance we can find millions of counter-examples in other parts of China and indeed the rest of the world. It's not surprising that the countries most praised by Western financial institutions, countries such as Brazil and Argentina, often ended up in desperate poverty. That's why in recent years much of Latin and South American countries have opted for socialism.

In our part of the world, capitalism has triumphed in Japan, South Korea, the province of Taiwan, and Singapore. The first three are unique and that's because they were the West's frontline states against China. Thus they were not allowed to failed. Western markets and technology were opened to them to help them succeed. The fact that these states are small and thus could never hope to rival the West militarily was also a point in their favor. States that are far from China or Russia were, however, allowed to suffer the full consequences of a dog-eat-dog world, a heartless capitalism that tore their societies asunder. It's questionable that any of these states can ever attain a standard of living comparable with the West , either within the next century or the next.

Singapore is a bit farther from China than the northeast Asian states, but like them it followed a development pattern based on the formation of an oligarchy, often ruled by one party headed by a strong man.  For much of its post-war period, Japan was ruled by one party. Korea too was led by a series of dictators until Kim Dae Jung took over. And Taiwan by the Jiang family. What does all this show? It's that in the early years of country formation, state-imposed discipline is necessary. Secondly, in order for certain industries to survive, protection is important. The need for protection was eloquently explained by Andrew Jackson when he told the British that America too would opt for free trade after it has, like Britian, centuries of development .

China, on the other hand, has gone into WTO with very limited protection. As a result, many local industries just cannot compete with Western products. Much of our so-called "made-in-China" products have foreign-made components. As Chairman Mao pointed out, if we follow, we will forever be left behind. We must adopt new ways of doing things, things that no one or very few others have thought about.  Thus China discovered a new way of producing insulin in the late 50s, and even had a prototyope jumbo jet not long after that.  The jump from atomic to hydrogen bomb was made within three years - a world record.

In order to defend itself and stop being the "sick man of Asia," China had to marshal its national resources for military R&D. It has to take care not only of one part of China, but all parts where external vultures were waiting to pounce upon. This often meant a lot of state planning, with little room left for a market economy.

However, market economy can be useful at a later stage of national development. But the role of the state often remains critical, which is why Singapore's economy is still heavily planned compared with, say, Australia or even Japan. And Singapore is a small island state, without the responsibilities associated with big, continental-sized countries like China. So those who're in love with the "market economy"  ought to see its strengths and weaknesses, and not talk in a way that only exposes their ignorance.

Singapore calls its system "democratic socialism." The same party - the PAP - has ruled Singapore since it achieved Independence during the sixties. Though Leninist in structure, it's a people-oriented party,  and it has made Singapore richer than many a Western democracy.  So the word "democracy" is fine so long as it encourages more voices, more participation in governance. But if it's a codeword for a Westminster democracy or an American democracy, no major non-Western country has succeeded in having that kind of system and continue to be able to feed its people.

What's discussed above seems far away from the idea of media independence, but in reality it's not. The point is that we have to manage news our own way, see problems our own way, and find solutions that fit our society and not that of other countries, East or West.  We need to invent a new terminology for what we do, a new language for concepts unique to China. We cannot continue to do things to please the West, as our leaders seem to be doing, and as our media seem to want China to do.

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