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Look, how the gweilos deal with their obesity ! [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2006-11-16 05:47:23 |Display all floors
Jamie Oliver takes aim at 'fattest nation in the world'
By David Usborne in New York
Published: 15 November 2006

Jamie Oliver, the outspoken celebrity chef and scourge of every school cook in Britain, has taken his healthy-eating message to the United States. And true to form, he is not mincing his words when it comes to American children and their particular battle with obesity.

"A fat person in England isn't the same as a fat person in America," Oliver gamely asserted yesterday, taking time off from a packed schedule in New York promoting his two latest ventures - a book and a television series about cooking in Italy.

Apparently unconcerned with the sensibilities of his American hosts, Oliver ploughed forth suggesting that the US should follow the example of Britain, which, on his urging, has recently banned Turkey Twizzlers and other fatty delights from school cafeterias, replacing them with healthier options.

"England is the most unhealthy country in Europe and America is the most unhealthy country in the world," Oliver told a Reuters reporter. He nonetheless acknowledged that he did not expect to repeat his British campaign for healthier school food in America, noting that as an "English boy in America, they might not appreciate my honesty".

Not that Oliver is necessary wrong in his observations. The number of overweight Americans has tripled since 1980, according to new figures from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, and the obesity rate among children and young people is expected to hit 20 per cent by the end of this decade.

If Oliver is afraid that Americans might take against him for his remarks, he doesn't show it. In recent days, he has been all over the television dial, putting the hosts of NBC's breakfast Today show through their culinary paces and making a guest appearance with Martha Stewart on her daily programme.

"Having a brilliant time in New York at the moment," he writes to fans in the latest instalment of a personal blog on his website. He also takes care to promote a couple of his favourite restaurants in Manhattan, including the British-themed Spotted Pig, the recent winner of a Michelin star.

But it is his own products that he is in town to sell. His book, Jamie's Italy, hit American bookshops earlier this month while the companion television show, Jamie Oliver's Great Italian Escape, will be broadcast to American audiences later this month.

New York, as it happens, has taken the lead among American cities to introduce legislation aimed at trimming the waistlines of its citizenry. A draft city ordinance championed by the city's Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, would ban artificial trans-fats from almost all restaurants. Partly in response, one national fast-food chain, KFC, recently announced plans to drop all trans-fats.

Oliver, 31, hailed the move by Mr Bloomberg, arguing that the setting of government guidelines remains the best way to tackle the problem and persuade the fast-food companies to change their manufacturing habits.

His campaign in Britain became a reality for school canteens - and for millions of less-than-delighted children - only when the Government backed it with legislation.

"The junk food companies have got more resources than the government and more money to spend on poxy lawyers so I completely admire and condone the Mayor for doing it," he commented, adding, however, that most American politicians are "subservient" to "junk food companies". His presence in New York coincides with the opening tomorrow of Gordon Ramsay's first venture in America, The London restaurant, on West 54th Street. The blunt-speaking Ramsay is already a fixture in America thanks to his reality show, Hell's Kitchen, on Fox television.



---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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Post time 2006-11-16 06:25:26 |Display all floors
Banning trans-fats sounds good. Also, a lot of schools are starting to reduce or eliminate vending machines that sell unhealthy things like chips, soda, and candy; many are revising their menus to include more healthy foods--whole wheat and multi-grain breads instead of white bread; less pizza (or pizza with real cheese and veggies on top). A problem with making healthier school lunches is that it's more expensive, and some schools simply don't have the budget.

But yeah, a trans-fat ban sounds good. We need to stop eating things that are bad for us and we need to start exercising more.

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Post time 2006-11-16 10:30:09 |Display all floors
Originally posted by whampoa at 2006-11-16 05:47
Jamie Oliver takes aim at 'fattest nation in the world'
By David Usborne in New York
Published: 15 November 2006

Jamie Oliver, the outspoken celebrity chef and scourge of ever ...



NO WONDERS THEY HAVE CLOSETS FULL OF OUT OF SIZED & OUT OF FASHION CLOTHINGS!!!

JUNKS THEY SAY.
What's on your mind now........ooooooooooooooo la la....Kind Regards

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Post time 2006-11-16 10:58:55 |Display all floors
I agree the school lunches in the US are terrible. They've done studies on changing school lunches (& breakfasts some places) and they showed that the kids also often got better grades and the biggest difference was less disruption - less arguments & fights, less kids being distracted in class. Overall they were more energetic & alert & positive.

My son rarely ate the school lunches. He thought they were gross. Although it was a pain making his lunch every morning, I was glad really. Sometimes I wished I could've just sent him off with $2 though, much easier. And I couldn't believe when we moved to a new town and I saw they had vending machines with soda, ice cream, etc in them. How can a parent control what their kid eats? When my kid is small, I want to know what he's eating, and TELL him he can or can't have something. To a small kid, an ice cream or bottle of iced tea or soda is a LOT of sugar, plus whatever else is in there. Yuck.

Shoot, now you all made me want ice cream. Thanks.



Ya know what? I thought it'd be harder to get junk food here in China. Sorry to say, nope. I was looking forward to having less food options, having to cook for myself, go out of the way to get chocolate so maybe I'd rarely have it. I guess I'd need to live in a little village if I want that. Darnit, now I guess it's up to me and my very own willpower. There's 2yuan ice cream right across the street. Every day. Right now. And it'll be there in a half hour when I get out of the shower too. And later at night. Hmm.  
Two yuan ice cream!
I am not rich.  :L

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Post time 2006-11-16 14:50:20 |Display all floors
Originally posted by freakyqi at 2006-11-16 10:58
I agree the school lunches in the US are terrible. They've done studies on changing school lunches (& breakfasts some places) and they showed that the kids also often got better grades and the  ...



Who cares Qweilos or Fatlos!!!
What's on your mind now........ooooooooooooooo la la....Kind Regards

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Post time 2006-11-19 13:23:18 |Display all floors
I have to say that I think the legislation is dangerous. America is based on the concept of personal freedom, and banning certain types of foods infringes upon that ideal.

I think it is a shame how many Americans are overweight, and I agree wholeheartedly that something needs to be done. But I believe that informing the public is better than placing restrictions. I think that making restaraunts label fatty foods and place warning labels and signs is a better option than completely dissallowing the food. Similar to the warnings they put on cigarette packs. It may not be as effective, but it is a slippery slope when they start legislating things like what you are allowed to eat. What is next? Ice cream, chocolate, or alfredo sauce?

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Post time 2006-11-19 15:28:36 |Display all floors
Originally posted by traveller54 at 2006-11-19 13:23
I have to say that I think the legislation is dangerous. America is based on the concept of personal freedom, and banning certain types of foods infringes upon that ideal.


traveller -
I don't think anyone's talking about banning foods from the public. But taking out most of the junk food from schools is different. In schools, it's young kids buying it. Young kids are not always capable of making good desicions on their own.

everyone-
Of course we should teach the kids, but do you think all 10yr olds can resist the temptation of buying candy & chips & soda when it's there & mom's not there to say no? The TEACHERS and SCHOOLS should also be helping to teach them, but what are school staff doing when they stand there in the cafeteria as a kid throws his lunch in the garbage because it's disgusting grey mushy vegetables with little nutrition left and goes to buy two ice creams instead? Yes, that happens, I've been on lunch duty in an American public school, and my kid was int he system, and so was I.

Most American school lunches are not very healthy, there is no encouragement or "food discipline" from cafeteria staff, and there is too much junk offered. I'd be GLAD to have the soda replaced with juice and the chips & chocolate replaced with fruit & nuts in my kid's school (if he was still there). Kid's will eat healthy if they're offered healthy food (eventually!). It should be up to the family to sparingly give them treats at their own discretion, like watching TV, playing video games, etc. What if the school was letting the kids do that stuff there? Would it be against america's freedoms to suggest we let the kids be free to choose to watch cartoons & play Nintendo in school?

Or should we tell kids one thing but offer them another?
I am not rich.  :L

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