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Post time 2006-6-16 07:07:21 |Display all floors
The trauma of war .... the silent killer, who started it and why?

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Iraq: 60 soldiers a month suffer mental illness
By Andy McSmith
Published: 15 June 2006

The number of soldiers diagnosed with psychiatric problems brought on by the stress of service in Iraq has dramatically escalated since the beginning of the war, according to new figures from the Ministry of Defence.

In 2005, the military authorities were notified of 727 cases of troops with psychiatric disorders brought on by their period in Iraq - an average of 60 each month, or two every day.

The figure is nearly 10 per cent of the total British military presence in Iraq. It includes 66 troops who developed such serious mental problems that they had to be airlifted out for treatment back home.

It is also a sharp increase on official statistics released four months ago, which revealed that 1,333 servicemen had needed treatment in the first two and a half years after the outbreak of the Iraq war, an average of around 40 a month.

These can be added to the total of at least 6,700 British casualties in Iraq, including 113 killed and 4,000 who injured or ill enough to need to be flown out for treatment.

Tom Watson, the Armed Services minister, revealed in the Commons last night in a written answer to the Tory MP Philip Dunne that the Defence Analytical Services Agency had been notified of 727 personnel in 2005 alone who had been examined for suspected mental health problems and were "subsequently identified as having a psychiatric disorder related to their service in Iraq".

Some of those may have been suffering from traumas experienced early on in the conflict, which would have gone undetected for two years. Mr Watson conceded that there could be many more with mental problems that were at least partly caused by what they have endured in Iraq.

He added: "It can also be difficult to determine the underlying causes of some mental health problems, some of which could be caused by a combination of other events that occurred before or after service."

Mr Dunne said: "This figure has enormous ramifications for the ability of the armed forces to keep up to strength and to maintain the morale of their troops. The people I feel particularly sorry for are members of the Territorial Army, who are plucked out of ordinary life and sent into Iraq, where they perform an invaluable service, and are then expected to fit back into ordinary life."

Last month, Mr Watson said that members of the TA who had served in Iraq would be entitled to "enhanced" mental health care.

At least 70 ex-servicemen with mental health problems caused by the Iraq war are now being cared for by the charity Combat Stress, which receives £2.8m a year from the MoD. They expect that figure to rise sharply over the years, because there can be a delay of 10 or 15 years before the time when a soldier leaves the Army and when he seeks help for mental problems.

The Iraq veterans they are now treating are mostly in their twenties. Some have post-traumatic stress disorder. Others suffer from depression, high levels of anxiety, or from the effect of trying to solve their own problems using drink or drugs. The number of cases referred to the charity by GPs and others jumped by 26 per cent last year and another sharp rise is expected this year.

"The figures are probably the bow wave of what we are likely to see in future, but we as a charity are hoping to be around when they make their way to our door," Combat Stress's spokesman Robert Marsh said.

The MoD maintains 15 mental health teams in the UK and has specialised defence units in six big NHS hospitals, to replace the military hospitals closed down after Labour came to power. The MoD has also spent millions having troops treated in private clinics.

The number of soldiers diagnosed with psychiatric problems brought on by the stress of service in Iraq has dramatically escalated since the beginning of the war, according to new figures from the Ministry of Defence.

In 2005, the military authorities were notified of 727 cases of troops with psychiatric disorders brought on by their period in Iraq - an average of 60 each month, or two every day.

The figure is nearly 10 per cent of the total British military presence in Iraq. It includes 66 troops who developed such serious mental problems that they had to be airlifted out for treatment back home.

It is also a sharp increase on official statistics released four months ago, which revealed that 1,333 servicemen had needed treatment in the first two and a half years after the outbreak of the Iraq war, an average of around 40 a month.

These can be added to the total of at least 6,700 British casualties in Iraq, including 113 killed and 4,000 who injured or ill enough to need to be flown out for treatment.

Tom Watson, the Armed Services minister, revealed in the Commons last night in a written answer to the Tory MP Philip Dunne that the Defence Analytical Services Agency had been notified of 727 personnel in 2005 alone who had been examined for suspected mental health problems and were "subsequently identified as having a psychiatric disorder related to their service in Iraq".

Some of those may have been suffering from traumas experienced early on in the conflict, which would have gone undetected for two years. Mr Watson conceded that there could be many more with mental problems that were at least partly caused by what they have endured in Iraq.

He added: "It can also be difficult to determine the underlying causes of some mental health problems, some of which could be caused by a combination of other events that occurred before or after service."
Mr Dunne said: "This figure has enormous ramifications for the ability of the armed forces to keep up to strength and to maintain the morale of their troops. The people I feel particularly sorry for are members of the Territorial Army, who are plucked out of ordinary life and sent into Iraq, where they perform an invaluable service, and are then expected to fit back into ordinary life."

Last month, Mr Watson said that members of the TA who had served in Iraq would be entitled to "enhanced" mental health care.

At least 70 ex-servicemen with mental health problems caused by the Iraq war are now being cared for by the charity Combat Stress, which receives £2.8m a year from the MoD. They expect that figure to rise sharply over the years, because there can be a delay of 10 or 15 years before the time when a soldier leaves the Army and when he seeks help for mental problems.

The Iraq veterans they are now treating are mostly in their twenties. Some have post-traumatic stress disorder. Others suffer from depression, high levels of anxiety, or from the effect of trying to solve their own problems using drink or drugs. The number of cases referred to the charity by GPs and others jumped by 26 per cent last year and another sharp rise is expected this year.

"The figures are probably the bow wave of what we are likely to see in future, but we as a charity are hoping to be around when they make their way to our door," Combat Stress's spokesman Robert Marsh said.

The MoD maintains 15 mental health teams in the UK and has specialised defence units in six big NHS hospitals, to replace the military hospitals closed down after Labour came to power. The MoD has also spent millions having troops treated in private clinics.

[END]

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Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

Use magic tools Report

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Post time 2006-6-19 05:41:21 |Display all floors

Violent crimes by children in UK?

Violent crimes by children in UK?  See how the schools deal with their problems.

*****

Teachers to be given sweeping powers to stop and search pupils
By Francis Elliott and Sophie Goodchild
Published: 18 June 2006

School pupils suspected of carrying knives are to be frisked or sent though airport-style scanners, The Independent on Sunday has learnt.

Headteachers report an escalating knife culture in Britain's schools in which fearful pupils increasingly carry blades for self-protection. Fatal stabbings such as that of 15-year-old Kiyan Prince, who bled to death at the gates of London secondary school last month, graphically illustrate the need for action, they say.

Alan Johnson, Secretary of State for Education, is drawing up guidance for schools on how to use new search powers which will be introduced later this year.

Headteachers will be instructed on what training and equipment staff will need to carry out the searches. Mr Johnson will also define when staff can carry out searches and what records are kept of those caught carrying blades.

A senior official from the Department for Education and Skills said: "We need to consider what help schools are going to need to make best use of the search powers. He's looking at airport-style frisking and scanners."

Officials stressed that the powers were voluntary and schools and others would be consulted before guidance on search procedures was issued.

Although the initiative is welcomed by teachers' professional bodies, some senior legal figures are concerned about the new stop-and-search measures.

"Taking a knife from a 14-year-old can be an extremely dangerous thing to attempt to do," said Lord Thomas QC, the Liberal Democrat spokesman on legal affairs.

The peer, who was a defence counsel in the case of murdered headteacher Philip Lawrence, wants extra protection for teachers and pupils during searches.

John Dunford, general secretary of the Secondary Heads Association, said: "I don't have any doubt that heads wanting to make use of this power will want to seek the help and advice of local police in how to conduct searches properly."

Strip-searching will be forbidden, while teachers carrying out the searches must be accompanied by at least one other member of staff of the same sex as the pupil. Only students that staff have reasonable grounds of believing are carrying weapons can be frisked ruling out the routine scanning seen in some US schools.

The proposed measure is contained in the Violent Crime Reduction Bill about to complete its final stages in Parliament.

Home Office ministers are considering whether to increase penalties for people carrying knives with no good reason from two to four years. Now, only weapons which serve no peaceful purpose, such as flick-knives and butterfly knives attract a four-year sentence.

A 10-week knife amnesty which began last month has so far netted nearly 18,000 weapons, according to figures released by the Home Office. Items handed in have included machetes, meat cleavers, axes and an anti-tank rocket launcher.

The Association of Chief Police Officers has been involved in the operation, where weapons can be handed in without fear of arrest, and members say they are pleased by the results so far.

However, campaign groups say that this represents the "tip of the iceberg" and that tougher measures are needed.

Crimestoppers says that knife crime is a serious problem in many urban areas. "In many areas knives have become an alternative to carrying a gun because knives are generally easier to access," said a spokesperson.

The Youth Justice Board, set up to tackle youth offending, say that more than half of all children excluded from school carry weapons including knives.

WEAPONS' TOLL

236 homicides due to "sharp instruments" in 2005

4,974 people treated by the NHS for wounds caused by knives or other bladed weapons in 2005

60,000 children aged 11 to 16 carrying knives in 2004, according to British Crime Survey estimate

100 violent incidents involving knives every day in England and Wales

2 years maximum jail term for carrying a knife

17,715 weapons surrendered in the first week of the national knives amnesty this month

[END]


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Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2006-6-21 10:58:28 |Display all floors

sighing...

The world is far from paradise........
One thing that's truly hard to eradicate is the idea.

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Rank: 4

Post time 2006-6-21 11:25:58 |Display all floors
too long, it is a challenge against patience....

I am trying

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Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2006-6-26 07:00:57 |Display all floors

Reply #3 crimsonwolf's post

sighing...

The world is far from paradise........


Paradise?  I won’t hope for that (referring to “world”), not now or in the near foreseeable future of a lifetime.

But the interesting thing from the article is the measures the schools are taking to “frisk”, search and scan the school pupils (like a police would do to a dangerous armed criminal).

The other interesting thing is the trend students are armed, carrying knives to school for protection.

The situation certainly looks serious, otherwise the schools would not resort to such desperate measure – "search and arrest” – (and the Ministry supported it) normally used on dangerous criminals to bring violence under control.  Remember, those pupils are just some 15 years' old kids.

Maybe, that shows the failure of some education and society.


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Whampoa

[ Last edited by whampoa at 2006-6-26 07:09 AM ]
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2006-6-26 07:06:56 |Display all floors

Reply #4 cinderellal's post

too long, it is a challenge against patience....

I am trying



Haha, at least let me thank you for trying. :)    I hope you are not one of those who go for trashy stuff.  People never get enough of that.

Today’s youths lack patience and want things fast and within reach easily, which is not necessarily a good thing as that makes them shallow, taking things for granted, complaining a lot and possibly turning them into a liability to an otherwise healthy society.

The article may be long but not entirely irrelevant.  Actually, I thought it wasn’t long at all.


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Whampoa

ps: I do have some "popular" article, but just wonder I should post it.  Let me think about it.

[ Last edited by whampoa at 2006-6-26 07:43 AM ]
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2006-6-26 09:39:49 |Display all floors

I spent 6 years in a war zone (Viet Nam)

As a result I was invited to attend some meetings at a vet center for vets with PTSD. In my opinion 95% of them are working the system. I told them that too...... Most of them admitted it and that they were in fact looking for a free ride.

Schools out of control...... Have you read about the school children during the cultrual revolution? You would be shocked.

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