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Is sorry enough? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2019-8-13 19:08:40 |Display all floors
Versace, an Italian brand, and Coach, a US brand, are in the spotlight for falsely implying Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan are "independent countries". Versace produced a T-shirt listing Hong Kong and Macao as such, while Coach produced one implying the same of Taiwan. Both companies have acknowledged their mistake, apologized and recalled the products.

Considering that some secessionists in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region are exhausting every means possible to make waves and cause trouble, and the ruling Democratic Progressive Party led by separatist leader Tsai Ing-wen is raising the devil trying to create the illusion that Taiwan is an independent country, the two brands' seemingly "inadvertent" support for their secessionist endeavors has naturally sparked a strong response.

This is not the first time that foreign companies that have sizable business interests in China have labeled inalienable parts of China as "independent countries" in the designs of their products or in the information they provide customers. The companies have successfully weathered the storm by issuing quick apologies.

But the latest cases should prompt the Chinese authorities to give some serious thought on how to stop this from happening again. Since such actions infringe upon China's sovereignty, it does not make sense to let foreign companies escape unscathed. Apparently, public censure cannot awaken the foreign companies to realize the seriousness of their "mistake", which is actually suspected of violating China's foreign investment laws.

All foreign businesses that operate in China are obliged to follow all the relevant laws of the country, which is an important guarantee for the country to maintain the order of its business environment, and protect the rights and interests of consumers and law-abiding companies. It is suggested that the Chinese law enforcement departments look into the cases to find the causes behind the "mistakes", and hold the responsible parties accountable. Or there can be a blacklist mechanism to force the companies to pay for their errors, and persuade others to respect China's sovereignty.

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Post time 2019-8-13 19:09:05 |Display all floors

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Post time 2019-8-13 19:09:41 |Display all floors

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Post time 2019-8-13 20:48:17 |Display all floors
ceciliazhang Post time: 2019-8-13 19:10

Do you think it would be a suitable punishment if the CEO's of such foreign companies had heavy signs chained around their necks and paraded through the streets and subject to public abuse and humiliation ? Would such a strategy stop these heinous crimes from ever happening again ?

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Post time 2019-8-13 21:48:54 |Display all floors
Takes a strong person to say sorry, and an even stronger one to forgive....
if you want something in life get off your backside, and do it yourself!! don't rely on others to do it for you

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Post time 2019-8-14 10:38:59 |Display all floors
Brands like Dolce Gabbana, Versace and Coach have to be very careful what they do with regards China.

In the past, luxury brands had looked down on the Chinese. Then when the Chinese rose in prosperity and started buying more of those expensive brands, the brands realized they had made a wrong assumption leading to a wrong perception ending in a wrong conclusion about the Chinese and China.

Their conclusion also has implication on the present Trump administration's wild approach on China. Basically, it is too impatient in wanting to wring exclusive benefits from China.

If only the luxury brands of the world can tell him that his approach is wrong because they are now enjoying the fruits of their patience with China, he may then see the folly of his approach and dial-back his acrimonious policies based on half-baked lies against China, and be a bit more patient.

Today, the biggest spenders of luxury goods in the world come from China. In a world focused only on growth, they have reemphasized value.  

Nevertheless, one thinks the exclusivity of the brands based on high prices is too elitist until almost absurd. Their only saving feature is design variety and thoughtfulness of craftsmanship. Given time, China can also outperform globally in these areas.

Now, either out of their thoughtlessness towards China or deliberate backroom sabotage, those three companies have only themselves to blame for hurting their Chinese customers and losing their brand loyalty and market share. The Chinese ladies who had unknowingly represented those brands should be applauded for standing up for China by dropping their roles.

Suppliers to China must realize when something wrong is done to offend China's sovereignty, their offense will be immediately put in the spotlight of millions in these days of rapid social media networking. No amount of apology will pay for the subsequent loss of business opportunities.

One would also like to see the same approach applied to how some western movie houses have made their Asian actors look bad in the movies for no reason than to portray their production houses are grudgingly accepting Asian funds to make those movies. Let the social media decide for themselves.

In both cases, "take your money, then insult you".

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