Author: reedak

Trump’s trade war hurting US economy   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-8-30 15:16:15 |Display all floors
US on Chine warpath.

US lawmakers want to sanction Chinese officials and companies for producing Video Surveillance used to check on trouble makers.

  I guess above mentioned gear is a popular seller in the US.  

  

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Post time 2018-9-1 15:44:25 |Display all floors
I don't see the need for Americans to manufacture anything. They can just print more the bulk loads of the dollar bills and ship in all the goods the want.
Trump is crazy in making Americans working for their Wal-Mart goods.

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Post time 2018-9-2 21:52:41 |Display all floors
Winston_Pang Post time: 2018-9-1 08:44
I don't see the need for Americans to manufacture anything. They can just print more the bulk loads  ...

Round Up is good for developing the mind

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Post time 2018-9-2 21:52:58 |Display all floors

Round Up is good for developing the mind

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Post time 2018-9-2 22:22:48 |Display all floors
At the end of the day, China is taking the bigger hit. And adding $200 billion in goods to the list of existing tariffs would bring the total value of tariffed goods to $450 billion—just shy of the $505 billion in exports that China sends to the U.S. That's going to hurt China more than it will hurt the US.

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Post time 2018-9-4 13:39:27 |Display all floors
18.  Iris Pang is the economist for Greater China, joining ING Wholesale banking in 2017.  She was previously employed by Natixis and OCBC Wing Hang Bank.  She earned a PhD in economics from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.   The following are excerpts from her 11 July 2018 article headlined "China: Changing the nature of retaliation on trade".

(Begin excerpts)
It may not be until September that we'll be able to assess the extent of China's qualitative retaliation to the overnight announcement by the US of an additional 10% tariff on $200 billion worth of goods.

Qualitative retaliation, but how?

Chinese imports from the US reached only $168 billion in 2017. So, after tariffs on $34 billion worth of goods, with an additional $16 billion in the pipeline, the overnight announcement (11 July) of a 10% tariff on a further $200 billion of goods means that China will likely retaliate "qualitatively", as previously indicated by the Chinese authorities.

Here are some measures we believe are possible (definitely not an exhaustive list). The uncertainty surrounding such qualitative retaliation could be a cause of concern for markets.

1.  We believe that the most likely "qualitative" retaliation is a version of the "Lotte Department store model" (a Korean store forced to shut down by the Chinese government after missiles were installed on land the company sold to the South Korean government). As they are opening up their market to the rest of the world, China should tread cautiously in making life difficult for US companies operating in China. But, they could, if they feel they need to, make US business operations on the mainland more cumbersome, making it clear that this is only a retaliation to US tariffs and specific to US companies. It is likely that European and domestic brands would emerge as winners.

2.  China can also limit tourists visiting the US, bringing business worth $115 billion in 2017 according to Xinhuanet....

3.  The final weapon is not the currency, but US treasuries. Even reshuffling the foreign exchange reserve portfolio slightly by selling some US treasuries and investing more in other sovereign bonds could push up US borrowing rates.

Quantitative retaliation is on the cards

Apart from qualitative measures, China could continue its retaliation quantitatively.

China could impose a higher tariff rate on US goods. They could also impose import quotas on US goods though this would probably violate WTO rules, and as China wants to maintain its strong reputation in the WTO, this would not be ideal.

China is more likely to win the trade war

When the US started the trade war, it turned away from a free-market model to a more planned economy. China had previously operated as a planned economy for many years.

China has already announced that the tariffs collected from US would be given back to Chinese companies affected by the trade war. China can also provide tax relief for affected exporters and provide incentives for exporters to sell their goods, either in the domestic market or through exploring possibilities in non-US foreign markets.

All these measures could come into effect more quickly in China than in the US, which has a more complicated administrative process…. (End excerpts)

Source:  thinkdotingdotcom
Donald Trump's infamous Hitler-style rabble-rousing chants:  "Lock her up!  Lock her up!"

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Post time 2018-9-4 16:22:36 |Display all floors
scruyaself Post time: 2018-9-2 23:33
Have you considered that with her huge foreign reserves China CAN take those hits? No?  Thought so ...

How are those hits doing now? Another $200 billion of tariffs are on the way. Can China take another hit? In the meantime, the US fairing quite well.

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