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CHINA'S LIGHTHOUSES LIGHT UP THE SOUTH CHINA SEA   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2015-10-18 07:47:18 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2015-10-18 15:03

By reason of its sovereignty over several islands in the South China Sea, China has built lighthouses on them to ensure safety of navigation for ships passing by.  By virtue of its generosity, this service is free to all ships of all countries.  Unfortunately, sovereignty and generosity invite envy and thus its islands face the threat of the Man of La Mancha who promises to enter its territorial sea with a show of force, inviting China to a test of might.  

Whether China obliges or not, it has won.  The unknown strikes fear in the hearts of those who enter its realm.  But China has nothing to fear.

China has known its sovereignty for a thousand years, and has lit up the South China Sea with the light of its civility.


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Post time 2015-10-18 08:06:11 |Display all floors
UNCLOS STATES:

PART II

TERRITORIAL SEA AND CONTIGUOUS ZONE
________________________________________

SECTION 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS

Article2

Legal status of the territorial sea, of the air space over the territorial sea and of its bed and subsoil

1. The sovereignty of a coastal State extends, beyond its land territory and internal waters and, in the case of an archipelagic State, its archipelagic waters, to an adjacent belt of sea, described as the territorial sea.

2. This sovereignty extends to the air space over the territorial sea as well as to its bed and subsoil.

3. The sovereignty over the territorial sea is exercised subject to this Convention and to other rules of international law.

SECTION 2. LIMITS OF THE TERRITORIAL SEA

Article3

Breadth of the territorial sea

Every State has the right to establish the breadth of its territorial sea up to a limit not exceeding 12 nautical miles, measured from baselines determined in accordance with this Convention.

Article4

Outer limit of the territorial sea

The outer limit of the territorial sea is the line every point of which is at a distance from the nearest point of the baseline equal to the breadth of the territorial sea.

Article5

Normal baseline

Except where otherwise provided in this Convention, the normal baseline for measuring the breadth of the territorial sea is the low-water line along the coast as marked on large-scale charts officially recognized by the coastal State.

Article6

Reefs

In the case of islands situated on atolls or of islands having fringing reefs, the baseline for measuring the breadth of the territorial sea is the seaward low-water line of the reef, as shown by the appropriate symbol on charts officially recognized by the coastal State.

Article7

Straight baselines

1. In localities where the coastline is deeply indented and cut into, or if there is a fringe of islands along the coast in its immediate vicinity, the method of straight baselines joining appropriate points may be employed in drawing the baseline from which the breadth of the territorial sea is measured.

2. Where because of the presence of a delta and other natural conditions the coastline is highly unstable, the appropriate points may be selected along the furthest seaward extent of the low-water line and, notwithstanding subsequent regression of the low-water line, the straight baselines shall remain effective until changed by the coastal State in accordance with this Convention.

3. The drawing of straight baselines must not depart to any appreciable extent from the general direction of the coast, and the sea areas lying within the lines must be sufficiently closely linked to the land domain to be subject to the regime of internal waters.

4. Straight baselines shall not be drawn to and from low-tide elevations, unless lighthouses or similar installations which are permanently above sea level have been built on them or except in instances where the drawing of baselines to and from such elevations has received general international recognition.

5. Where the method of straight baselines is applicable under paragraph 1, account may be taken, in determining particular baselines, of economic interests peculiar to the region concerned, the reality and the importance of which are clearly evidenced by long usage.

6. The system of straight baselines may not be applied by a State in such a manner as to cut off the territorial sea of another State from the high seas or an exclusive economic zone.

Article8

Internal waters

1. Except as provided in Part IV, waters on the landward side of the baseline of the territorial sea form part of the internal waters of the State.

2. Where the establishment of a straight baseline in accordance with the method set forth in article 7 has the effect of enclosing as internal waters areas which had not previously been considered as such, a right of innocent passage as provided in this Convention shall exist in those waters.

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Post time 2015-10-18 08:42:36 |Display all floors
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Post time 2015-10-18 11:11:16 |Display all floors
You left out the part in the treaty that excludes man made islands.  

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Post time 2015-10-18 15:09:55 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2015-10-18 15:36
Incedius420 Post time: 2015-10-18 11:11
You left out the part in the treaty that excludes man made islands.

Low-tide elevations are not man-made islands.  They have been part of China's sovereign territory for more than a thousand years.  Building lighthouses on them automatically entitles them to their own 12 nautical mile of surrounding territorial sea.  Besides, lighthouses show China's hospitality to those seeking passage between her many islands.  How can showing ships trapped by thick clouds, dense fogs, and churning seas the way to safety be construed as hampering the free passage of ships in the surrounding international waters?  Threatening the lighthouses, on the other hand, can hardly be called "innocent" or aiding the safe passage of ships through these shoal-ridden seas.

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Post time 2015-10-18 15:38:15 |Display all floors
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Post time 2015-10-18 17:15:25 |Display all floors
abramicus Post time: 2015-10-18 15:09
Low-tide elevations are not man-made islands.  They have been part of China's sovereign territory f ...

The treaty uses high-tide as the elevation mark.

The "island" also has to have some economic value or human habitation to count as a island. If not it's just a rock or shoal, atoll, whatever else you want to call it,  does not count.

Spill some more lies,  its really helping your cause.



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