Author: UYA

Why I believe in China   [Copy link] 中文

Post time 2015-4-1 00:35:05 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Medal of honor July's Best Writer 2012 June's Best Writer 2012

Post time 2015-4-1 01:12:45 |Display all floors
QuatreVingtSept Post time: 2015-4-1 00:34
You miss the point, intentionally or otherwise. Your claims to being American and the things you sa ...

When I think about it....
you are the ONLY poster to accuse me of being "racist" Geeezzzz
that is the last thing I would want to be know as.

as for being "bias"?????
Let me put it simply......
When I was younger, I was proud to be an American.
Seeing daily how others in the world suffer, I found my life blessed.
Growing older and experiencing the "system" and how it favors wealth and people who lie, I grew more and more disillutioned.
I realized the country I was once proud of, has been the cause of suffering I wanted to advoid.

On a personal side, I will share this.....
another reason I came to China was because when my father died, there was an ugly money grab.
I could not stomach being a witness to such a distasteful show of greed.
My family is shattered over the need for MONEY.

So I hope you can understand why I have this "thing" about a system that (IMO) has ruined peoples lives and the root of the cancerous ills in the world.

I see no way to change things internally in the US. The only way it can change is by an "outside" force that can match and win at this stupid money game the US promotes and idolizes.
A friend of mine who works at Pearl Harbor and has a "Top Secret" clearance told me 10 years ago...
"China does not want to beat America through military force...It wants to beat the US via its economy".

So I'm here cheering on China's side.

Use magic tools Report

Post time 2015-4-1 06:19:25 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Medal of honor July's Best Writer 2012 June's Best Writer 2012

Post time 2015-4-1 09:37:01 |Display all floors
QuatreVingtSept Post time: 2015-4-1 06:19
In reality how many accuse you of bias is irrelevant. It only  matters if I am able to substantiate  ...

I'm glad you took out the "name calling" part in you edit.

The US "charity" you speak of only masks the poverty inflicted by corporate greed in other coutries world wide.
I don't believe in charity, it is only a short term fix to something deep rooted in captialism.

How many countries does US corporations exploit?
How many popular leaders were over thrown (or murdered)?
How many cruel dictators were supported by US?

Another thing to ask yourself.....
What did China ever do to America vs what did America do to China?
Did China ever invade US soil?
What suffering has China done outside its borders?
China is known to be hands off when dealing with internal problems of other coutries.
The US on the other hand enjoys using its might to dictate policy (back up with force) to weeker nations.

Keep on drinking the "red, white and blue kool aid" and open your eyes to the crimes committed by the US.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2015-4-1 23:48:32 |Display all floors
I have long argued that U.S. decline as a hegemonic power began circa 1970 and that a slow decline became a precipitate one during the presidency of George W. Bush. I first started writing about this in 1980 or so. At that time the reaction to this argument, from all political camps, was to reject it as absurd. In the 1990s, quite to the contrary, it was widely believed, again on all sides of the political spectrum, that the United States had reached the height of unipolar dominance.

However, after the burst bubble of 2008, opinion of politicians, pundits, and the general public began to change. Today, a large percentage of people (albeit not everyone) accepts the reality of at least some relative decline of U.S. power, prestige, and influence. In the United States this is accepted quite reluctantly. Politicians and pundits rival each other in recommending how this decline can still be reversed. I believe it is irreversible.

Finally, there are two real consequences of which we can be fairly sure in the decade to come. The first is the end of the U.S. dollar as the currency of last resort. When this happens, the United States will have lost a major protection for its national budget and for the cost of its economic operations. The second is the decline, probably a serious decline, in the relative standard of living of U.S. citizens and residents. The political consequences of this latter development are hard to predict in detail but will not be insubstantial.

by Immanuel Wallerstein

Use magic tools Report

Post time 2015-4-2 00:47:57 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Post time 2015-4-2 01:09:31 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.