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Why do Chinese choose 'weird' English names?[1]- Chinadaily.com.cn [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-10-29 13:47:26 |Display all floors
Editor's note: Many young Chinese like to take an English name but some of the ones they pick seem weird to native speakers. Why do they like having English names? Do you think it is necessary? Forum readers share their thoughts. You're welcome to add yours.

Matt (US)

I can't count the number of Chinese guys I have met named Tiger. I suppose they figure there is Tiger Woods, but they really do ...

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Post time 2014-10-29 15:55:13 |Display all floors
Good question. Why not keep your real name and explain to people what it means? People tend to remember your Chinese name once they know what it means.

However, many people have pen names and stage names that are more marketable according to trends.
Generous treatment of captured enemy troops.
Death to those that choose to fight.

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Post time 2014-10-29 18:43:28 |Display all floors
It is usually just treated as a nickname, which is very common for people everywhere. In the west, Chinese pick English names as a sign of assimilation, and also not to have their Chinese names butchered constantly. Besides, Chinese culture places far more emphasis on the last name, not the first.

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Post time 2014-10-30 20:52:36 |Display all floors
Seems my English name is not so wired.

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Post time 2014-10-31 03:37:22 |Display all floors
Having an "yingwen mingzi" is a fad imported from Hongkong, where it is a colonial habit that still persists. I can partly understand the need to be easily identified by foreigners, but nowhere else in the world (like in Poland, with its complicated Slavic names) do people have "English" names.

Furthermore, when I do business with Chinese men and women, it certainly does not impress me to receive business cards that only say "Candy" or "Kelly". It is outright disrespectful not giving your real name.

To me, it all looks like extremely low self-esteem. There is nothing wrong with Chinese names, and they should be used as is, without "reversing" them (like the Japs do) and without adding an "English" nickname (and these "English" names are mostly French and other non-English names anyway).

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Post time 2014-10-31 16:02:22 |Display all floors
It just like some foreigner name themselves by some famous people in
ancient china.If your can not accept "weird" words as a name.So you can regad them as a nickname.It is just a title for those people who pick up a foreign name.

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Post time 2014-11-4 17:35:06 |Display all floors
I often think that people in the west are too lazy to remember even simple Chinese names. However, there are some that are very difficult to pronounce and remember. As an English teacher in China, many students like to have a western name. I try to match a names sound with the sound of their real Chinese name. But some children have such strange names... where do they find them??? Rock, Secoya, Lumpy...?? Well, it makes life colourful.    What about the spelling? Allise, Tonie ???

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