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What China should do to tackle the brain drain? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-12-18 15:22:54 |Display all floors
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San Francisco, California, is a popular destination for Chinese emigrants. Photo: SCMP Picture.

(SCMP) More than 150,000 Chinese became permanent citizens in major immigrant countries including the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand last year, topping the world’s list of overseas migration in absolute numbers, a recent report revealed.

The Centre for China and Globalisation (CCD) and Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) School of Law jointly released their findings in the Chinese International Talents Annual Blue Book's International Migration Report (2012) on Monday, according to media reports.

Global migration increased from 195 million in 2005 to 214 million in 2010, constituting 3.1 per cent of the world's population, statistics showed.

International migration in and out of China spiked in the past decade. In 2010, the number of overseas Chinese reached 45 million, ranking first in the world.

Another report by Hurun Research Institute and Bank of China in 2011 found that 14 per cent of China’s high-net-worth individuals had either emigrated or were in the process of doing so.

In addition, 46 per cent were considering permanently moving overseas through various immigrant investor programmes with real estate, foreign currency deposits and stocks being the primary areas of investment.

US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) declared that 41 per cent of total EB-5 Immigration Investor Programme applicants were Chinese while the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship reported that 61.5 per cent of applicants for the Business Skilled Migration Programme were Chinese.

China’s brain and wealth drain is increasing as highly-skilled professionals and wealthy individuals leave the country in record numbers in search of better education and services, secure investment environments and higher standards of living.

The report concluded by identifying six international migration development trends: increasing size and complexity of international migration – IOM forecasts the total number of international migrants to reach 405 million by 2050; increasing proportion of skilled migration; deepening integration of immigrants in host countries; rising environmental migration; increasing role of non-governmental organisations in the issue of modern international migration; and increasing complexity of irregular immigration issues.






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Post time 2012-12-18 20:52:25 |Display all floors
This post was edited by 468259058 at 2012-12-18 20:52

Why did so many Chinese leave China, even after China is the number 2 on the list of countries' GDPs?

Do many South Korean, many Japanese, Many people in Southeast Asia, are leaving their countries too?
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Post time 2012-12-19 10:18:33 |Display all floors
Put them on the government pay roll.

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Post time 2012-12-19 12:08:42 |Display all floors
Hm... no rants from Timmy or Kbay?  {smirk}  Yeah, forgot about that...

... but I digress.  It can really be simple.  Case in point, friend of my wife in the Chicago area and her family.  The mom was an Electrical Engineer (Korea/China), dad was a business executive (Japan) - they came to America to make sure that their son got a good education that he would not receive in any of the three countries because of the various residential and social issues of a 'mixed' child in any of the three countries.  Mom is a nail-tech, dad a massase, son enrolled in a top Chicagoland University with a good scholarship based on academic ability - not guanxi or red envelopes.

It is a solution that would be an intangible issue in the Asian Rim.  Sorry, but the 'brain drain' will continue.
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Post time 2012-12-19 12:12:46 |Display all floors
You could just as easily say that China has a surplus of brains and wealth relative to the rest of the world.
So far this forum shows that many of the westerns living in China are brain dead.
Not a fair trade but China can afford to be charitable.
If capitalism promotes innovation and creativity then why aren't scientists and artists the richest people in a capitalist nation?

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Post time 2012-12-19 13:38:06 |Display all floors
tradervic Post time: 2012-12-19 12:08
Hm... no rants from Timmy or Kbay?  {smirk}  Yeah, forgot about that...

... but I digress.  It can  ...

Yes, education, if not the most important, is one of the main reasons why such a large number of wealthy people emigrate to some developed countries. Corruption is rampant in every corner of the Chinese society, education is no exception. Only when a fairer education has achieved in China will more talents stay in their motherland.

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Post time 2012-12-19 13:44:03 |Display all floors
robert237 Post time: 2012-12-19 12:12
You could just as easily say that China has a surplus of brains and wealth relative to the rest of t ...

The Westerners always enjoy more privileges than Chinese do in China. I think that's why they want to live in China. Don't you think so?

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