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Who are shameless?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-12-11 14:01:24 |Display all floors
Last week, foreign consulates in the southern Chinese megalopolis of Guangzhou held a charity sale to raise funds for disabled children. The event raised 330,000 RMB (about US$53,000), but the Belgian consulate received 5,000 RMB in counterfeit money. The news was published in China’s domestic media, leading some online commentators to call the buyers who used counterfeit money “shameless.”
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At least one man, however, instead believes that the foreign consulates, who set out to help China’s less fortunate, were the shameless ones.
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He Keng (@贺铿), the former vice bureau chief of China’s National Bureau of Statistics and the director of the Statistics Institute at China’s Central University of Finance and Economics, offered this comment on Tencent Weibo, one of China’s leading microblogging services:

To be honest, foreign consulates do this kind of thing in order to humiliate Chinese people! Does China need the 330,000 RMB? And that money came from Chinese people anyway! I think the people who do these so-called ‘charity events’ are really the shameless ones.

Mr. He posted another tweet on Sina Weibo, another microblogging platform, with equally perplexing logic:
RMB330,000 is only a month or two of salary for the U.S. consul general. They engage in this charity sale with much fanfare, then [publicize] the fact that Chinese people bought the charity products with counterfeit money. Is that really charity?

The official Weibo account of the Belgian Consulate in Guangzhou (@比利时王国驻广州总领事馆) also got into the act, posting this response: 1. We participated in this event organized by the Guangdong foreign affairs office, and all products were donated by Belgian companies which took no compensation. 2) The price at which the products were sold were manufacturer’s prices, not marked-up prices. 3) All profits (more than 7,000 RMB) were donated. How is that shameful? All of our colleagues worked overtime all day on Saturday for charity! What was really shameful was the 5,000 RMB in counterfeit money.

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Post time 2012-12-11 14:02:03 |Display all floors

To accusation of former Chinese chief of state statistical bureau that the charity sales of foreign diplomatic missions in Guangzhou was shameless, Belgian consulate in Guangzhou responded through Weibo that they have nothing to be ashamed of.

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Post time 2012-12-11 15:07:19 |Display all floors
This post was edited by abramicus at 2012-12-11 15:13

Counterfeiting is a crime, and neither the Chinese nor the Belgian governments have anything to do with it.  As to the nationality of the counterfeiter who bought the donated items, they could be Japanese, British, Chinese, Belgian, etc.  Whatever nationality they may belong to does not reflect on the entire nation of their people either.  Thus, instead of blaming and shaming each other, the Belgian and Chinese governments should join hands in tracing the thieves and bringing them to justice wherever they are, whoever they may be.

You can bet that the counterfeiters would want to buy the most expensive or the biggest single volume of any item, in order to be rid of their fake monies.  Therefore, the audience and auctioneer should be asked to be debriefed on whom they remembered bought something truly expensive or in truly large amounts, and others can then be asked where they saw them come from or leave to.  If there are security cameras around the area where the auction took place, such persons might already be on tape, albeit not yet identified.

One would not be surprised that the two sides accusing each other actually work for the same syndicate to provide political camouflage for their getaway!  It is like two thugs making up a fight in the market, while the thieves take their loot out on the side.


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Post time 2012-12-11 16:13:45 |Display all floors
I also once tried to pay with a faked 100-Yuan bill, as I didn't know it was faked. I got it from the bank and didn't know that this can happen... Not everyone knows how to figure out whether a bill is faked or not - and most foreigners have no idea that there is so much counterfeited money cyclinc in China. Afterwards, I asked some Chinese friends to teach me how to figure it out and I also bought a UV lamp to check UV markers on 50 and 100 Yuan bills when I get them.

I don't think any government can be blamed for this - the Chinese police is really doing everything they can to fight money fakers, but it's simply too difficult.
What more could China do to fight counterfeiters and organized crime in general?

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Post time 2012-12-14 08:00:35 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2012-12-11 05:22
Sorry some of your posts belittling shabby behaviour by Chinese simply don't wash! The OP did not  ...

Good propaganda work. If only you could prove anything you just wrote.
If capitalism promotes innovation and creativity then why aren't scientists and artists the richest people in a capitalist nation?

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Post time 2012-12-14 08:02:17 |Display all floors
The truly shameless are missionaries who come to China to spread the filth of their western religions
hoping the pave the way for a take over by their capitalist masters.
If capitalism promotes innovation and creativity then why aren't scientists and artists the richest people in a capitalist nation?

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Post time 2012-12-14 09:48:36 |Display all floors
I think that guy makes his statements from emotion and not evidence.

I have also been a victim to money fakers.


The day I stop learning will be the day I die. Maybe.

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