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Every amazing, strange, and delicious food I tried in China [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-6-4 10:50:38 |Display all floors
(Business Insider) With 1.3 billion people and 56 ethnic groups, China has one of the most complex and diverse cuisines in the world.
Dozens of different regional cuisines are drastically different from one another with different flavor profiles, ingredients, and cooking methods.
On a recent six-week trip to China, I tried to eat as many different dishes in the country as possible, tasting everything from Peking Duck to Shaanxi fried squid.

Here is everything I ate in six weeks in China:

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I flew into Hong Kong in southeastern China. Hong Kong is known for having a robust street food scene. I started with a beef skewer cooked in chili-garlic sauce. The vendor also sold more adventurous skewers like squid and pork intestines, but I was just getting warmed up.

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Cantonese food (i.e. Hong Kong and neighboring Guangdong province) is typically associated with siu mei, or rotisserie roast meats. This roast goose is marinated in soy-garlic sauce and served with peanuts. Its skin is crispy and the meat is juicy.
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Post time 2018-6-4 10:52:14 |Display all floors
On the second day of my trip, I headed to Macau for the opening of the MGM Cotai, a swanky new casino-resort. At Five-Foot Road, I ate Szechuan cuisine, known for its spicy, garlicky flavors and the use of the numbing Szechuan peppercorn.
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A classic Szechuan dish is dan dan mian, noodles in a spicy sauce of chili oil, minced pork, and scallions. The numbing Szechuan peppercorn tingles on your tongue as you eat the noodles.
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Post time 2018-6-4 10:53:48 |Display all floors
Next, I had lunch at Chun, a restaurant at MGM Cotai that takes classic Cantonese dishes and elevates them with modern twists. This fried shredded oyster mushroom was a house specialty. It was like the thinnest, crispiest onion rings I've ever had.
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The meal ended with a high-end take on fried rice. It had duck liver and bits of Wagyu beef in it. It was very rich tasting, but without the oiliness that one usually gets in fried rice served at Chinese-American take-out joins.
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Post time 2018-6-4 10:55:21 |Display all floors
When I returned to Hong Kong, I headed for a traditional Cantonese breakfast of congee with shredded salt pork and "century egg," or egg preserved in clay and quicklime. The strong, salty, pungent egg is perfect with the bland congee. The dish is often served with fried dough sticks for dipping. It's a heavy breakfast.
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