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Get Paid to Travel: The 12 Best Jobs in Travel [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-5-21 12:54:52 |Display all floors
(By Graeme Green via Wanderlust)


From travel writing and photography to working with animals, getting paid to travel is many people’s dream job. Here, 12 experts in their fields tell you the highs, lows and what it takes to succeed...

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Post time 2018-5-21 12:56:42 |Display all floors
1. Travel photographer

Timothy Allen


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What’s so great about it? I love the unknown. Travel is one of the only surefire ways of jumping into the unknown. Every time I do something, I don’t know what’s going to happen to me. I’ve always loved meeting new cultures. I like the romance of travel, like arriving at a bazaar in the Middle East and finding people with their faces covered and strange music playing. I’m still hooked on that experience. Nowadays, you have to go to the ends of the earth to get it, but it’s still the reason why I travel. Mongolia is always a favorite. Visiting the Wodaabe in Niger was incredible, and the Bayaka in the Central African Republic. I want that ‘pinch myself’ feeling when I’m doing something completely alien to my own lifestyle.

The hard reality: As you get older, your priorities change. I do a lot more production from the office now. I have young kids, so I’ve had to curtail trips because I can’t stand being away for more than three weeks, whereas 10 years ago, I’d have been away for 11 months. You can prepare yourself for physical hardships but the emotional stuff - missing home, the frustration when things don’t go according to plan - can cause intense mental and emotional problems. Most places I’ve travelled to have been off-the-beaten-track and less well-developed, so the sanitation and living standards are very low. I’m quite prepared to put up with discomfort in order to get the experience.

Skills and Qualifications: There are no rules anymore. When I started, I worked at a national newspaper in the UK, which was brilliant training for the ability to deliver pictures even if conditions aren’t what you want or expect. You can train anyway you want, but for most people it comes from doing it for a long period of time. In photography, the main qualification you need is enthusiasm. With my first job, my portfolio was nothing special, but I was super enthusiastic and that’s why I got the break. If the newspaper rang me at 6am on a Sunday morning and asked me to go on a job, I’d just say ‘yes’. What you can learn from college is how to take a good photo. The only part of photography that’s hard to learn is your ability to interact with people, which is a huge part of the job. That comes from your personality and life experience. You have to be original. You really have to be excited about what you’re doing. Find your own voice and do that thing that’s you.

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Post time 2018-5-21 12:57:59 |Display all floors
2. Wildlife conservationist

Dr. Cheryl Mvula (Born Free)


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What’s so great about it? I love that I get to live out my passion to help both vulnerable wildlife and rural communities living with wildlife in Africa. I’ve worked all over East Africa, along with Sri Lanka. My favorite places to work are Zambia's Luangwa Valley and the Masai Mara in Kenya. Both have bountiful wildlife, breath-taking landscape and some of the richest local culture on the continent. Highlights of my career to date have been rescuing over 550 primates from the illegal bushmeat and pet trades in Zambia and returning them to the wild, along with helping the Maasai tribe overcome years of exploitation to benefit from cultural tourism to their manyattas (settlements).

The hard reality: Cutting through the reams of government red tape and overcoming corruption is a constant struggle and sometimes makes you lose heart. I then see a wild animal we’ve rescued from the most horrendous conditions back in the bush, living a totally free life, and I remember why I’m doing this. The wildlife gives me my motivation and strength. You also need to be prepared for long hours in the bush, living in really basic conditions: a tent, a bucket shower and a long drop toilet, with lions sometimes for company when you need to go pee at night.

Skills and Qualifications: I did a Masters in Conservation Biology at DICE, University of Kent in the UK. It’s a really great course, very practical and engaging. More important than qualifications though is to get lots of experience of conservation under your belt by volunteering on working conservation projects. Check out the Born Free website for volunteering experiences in Zambia, Malawi and South Africa.

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Post time 2018-5-21 12:59:48 |Display all floors
3. Pilot

Thomas Bradley (Icefield Discovery)


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What’s so great about it? Mountain flying is my passion and where I’m happiest. Highlights of my career as a pilot so far include operating in some very mountainous and challenging environments, such as New Zealand’s Southern Alps and the St Elias Mountain Range in Canada’s remote Yukon Territory. I’ve flown various aircraft, from Nomads to Helio Courier ski planes. I really enjoy flying and showing folks from all over the world these incredible landscapes and remote areas, whether they are mountaineers, scientists or tourists, and seeing the joy and excitement of exploring wilderness areas that are untouched and unspoilt.

The hard reality: The job certainly has it’s challenges, largely weather-related, or inaccessibility with various conditions such as snow, wind or poor lighting at the landing sites. On these occasions, you feel like you are actually ‘working’. Flying is a passion and even on the toughest of days, the flying is still fun. If any of the conditions present an unsafe environment to operate, then we won’t, so it’s largely about mitigating risk, but at the same time getting the job done, being productive, but not at the expense of safety. Often it’s very hard when climbers are running low on food, fuel, and morale, telling them the weather isn’t suitable to get them out. They know that is a risk before going in, but you still feel that sense of responsibility to their well-being, knowing you are their only way out.  

Skills and Qualifications: A basic Commercial Pilot’s License is the first part. Typically you need 200 hours of flight time, written exams completed and other things to qualify to sit a Commercial Flight Test. Operations like Icefield Discovery will look for candidates who have completed a minimum of 1000 hours, significant tail wheel experience and time on ski-equipped aircraft, with mountain flying experience. Practical experience is hard to come by for many, so we do train the ‘right’ candidates that meet other criteria. Being passionate about mountain flying and having an eagerness to learn is a good start.

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Post time 2018-5-21 13:01:25 |Display all floors
4. Travel writer

Graeme Green


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What’s so great about it? Travel writing opens up the world. In the last 10 years, I’ve motorcycled across the salt flats of Bolivia, paraglided with vultures in Nepal, cycled through Burma, dived with manta rays in Hawaii, snowshoed in Japan and met remote Amazon tribes in Peru. It’s an exciting, fast-moving job, with never the same day twice. You can be in the Botswana desert one day, a colorful coastal town in Norway the next. You’re constantly learning about the world, discovering new things about places, people, politics, wildlife and nature. Being on assignment can push you to travel in a deeper way. You keep your eyes open, alert to details. You interview people, talk more, ask questions, and consider places from different angles. There’s great pleasure too in the writing process: collecting your ideas and research, crafting your story, and ultimately seeing your article laid out, along with your photos, in a magazine or newspaper. The more of the world you see, the more you want to see. This is a job for people who are curious and adventurous.

The hard reality: Travel writing is fiercely competitive. You have to have talent and great ideas, and you’ll need to develop industry contacts and find original story ideas. You’ll spend a lot of time pitching ideas to editors, many of which might be ignored or rejected. You need to work even harder to break through. Life on the road is exciting, but it can also be disorienting and sometimes lonely. Living out of a bag isn’t for everyone, nor is spending so much time away from family, friends and ‘normality’. It’s a job with early mornings, long hours in planes, buses, airports and train stations, and often very basic living conditions. You need to be adaptable. Very few travel writers become millionaires; if money is your primary goal, there are better way to get rich.

Skills and Qualifications: There are travel writers out there with a Journalism qualification, a degree in English Literature or other courses related to writing. They’re a good way to practice writing and pick up skills. Writing classes and seminars are also a way to develop skills and get helpful feedback from experts. Many people think they can write, but you don’t know until you challenge yourself with genuine serious feedback from professionals, such as editors and working journalists. Look at the publications you want to write for and analyze what they do: tone, style, structure... The best advice is to get started. Having a blog or writing articles for smaller websites or publications will give you practice and experience, as well as something solid to demonstrate your abilities to editors. Be enthusiastic. If you do get an opportunity, take it with both hands. Hand in brilliant and error-free pieces on or ahead of deadline. You should really only do this job if you love writing, as much as you love travel.

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Post time 2018-5-21 13:05:16 |Display all floors
5. Wildlife cameraman

Tom Crowley (Planet Earth II)


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What’s so great about it? For people passionate about the outdoors and wildlife, there isn’t really anything better. It’s a role that lets you travel the world and spend a lot of time observing and watching animal behavior, usually at the best time too. Because we are often documenting ‘events’, such as migrations, spawning, courtship or predator/prey interactions, we go at the peak of activity and spend from dawn to dusk with the animals. I’ve worked in the Bering Sea filming Humpback whales and shearwaters and in Patagonia filming the iconic orcas of Peninsula Valdez beach-stranding to hunt seals. I’ve filmed puffer fish in Japan making sand castles for Planet Earth 2, filmed the marine iguanas and snakes of the Galapagos, as well as jaguars, dolphins and spider monkeys in South America. Ski touring after mountain goats in Glacier National Park, USA, was a definite highlight.

The hard reality: We spend an awful lot of time away, which is great, but you miss out on birthdays, weddings and friends’ lives. On average, I spend between 6-8 months a year away. Once on location, we are so focused on the story that you rarely get to see much of the rest of the country or location, and once we’ve finished filming, we head home. On average, I travel with 15-20 cases, which can weigh between 300-500kg, so airports aren’t fun. When we were filming mountain goats, we were working about 18-20 hours per day for a month non-stop, which includes all the filming, the daily travel to the area and the admin at the end of the day because you need to download the footage and charge batteries.  I had an alarm on every hour to get up and check the download, so in that month I worked around 540 hours. The plus side was I got really fit and lost a lot of weight.

Skills and Qualifications: I have a BSc in Marine Science and an MSc Natural Resource Management. However, I really learnt on the job. I learnt black and white photography and developing when I was ten, and that was a good foundation in the properties of light. I loved photography as a result. After my degree, I used to go to Patagonia and Antarctica for about four years working on Blue and Humpback whale research, as well as photography assignments, and when I came back to the UK, I went to speak to some producers at the BBC’s Natural History Unit who were working up ‘Ocean Giants’. One thing led to another and I ended up at the NHU. I was 28, a runner, and I took a big pay cut, but it was the best thing that could have happened to me.

Smile at whatever happens.
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Post time 2018-5-21 13:06:34 |Display all floors
6. Expedition leader

Tom Richardson (KE Adventure)


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What’s so great about it? It feels like the best job in the world. What could be better than helping people to have the adventure of a lifetime in the most dramatic and beautiful scenery in the world, working with so many fantastic local people along the way? This is a job that’s taken me all over the world. My favorite places are sometimes those that are not the obvious popular destinations, like the Karakoram Mountains in Pakistan. Western Mongolia, Tibet and Central Asia are at the top of my list, but everyone, including me, has a big place in their heart for Nepal’s amazing mountains and wonderful people. My favorite trip is usually the last one I lead or the one I’m leading at the time.

The hard reality: On any trip, problems can be encountered. I was in Istanbul airport during the attempted coup in 2016, for example. Sometimes I might need to sort out ways around landslides on mountain roads, assist carrying a sick group member down a mountain and arrange a helicopter rescue, deal with other medical problems in our group, or retrace steps for hours to find a forgotten camera or passport. Perhaps I have been lucky, as I’d estimate that about 98 per cent of everyone who’s been with me have been an absolute delight to be with.

Skills and Qualifications: I first climbed and trekked in the Himalaya in 1979 and have been exploring the wild places of the world with and without groups ever since. A passion for it and the desire to share the adventure with others are the most important things. Being strong enough to deal with any situation, whether it is a petty border official or a rock slide blocking your path, with calmness and good humor is also essential. Qualifications such as the Summer and Winter Mountain Leader and Mountain First Aid are essential requirements these days to overlay lots and lots of experience of doing your own thing and having your own adventures.

Smile at whatever happens.
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