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Do you like Jin Yong's Legends of the Condor Heroes? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-3-28 10:55:41 |Display all floors
(People's Daily Online) The famous Chinese martial arts novel Legends of the Condor Heroes has been highly acclaimed by foreign readers after its first volume A Hero Born was for the first time published in English by the MacLehose Press this February.

It has been rated over 4 stars on Amazon.com. In the UK, it received an average rating of 4.2 stars.
The book is sold at 14.99 pounds on the official website of the MacLehose Press. "If you are a fan of Lord of the Rings and are looking for the next best thing, A Hero Born is definitely the book for you," says the introduction of the book on the publisher’s website.
A reader who goes by the name Diana O commented that she only had two words to describe this book: pure greatness, adding that she absolutely loved it.
Another reader Nathaniel Gardner-Blatch gave a top rating of five stars over the book, saying the novel is mesmeric and a fantasy of the highest quality.
However, some readers attributed the hot sales of the book to its marketing since it has been frequently compared to the Lord of the Rings during its promotion.
According to the MacLehose Press, the translated work will come in 12 volumes, covering three books.

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Post time 2018-3-28 17:01:29 |Display all floors
Have fun with the translation describing martial arts movement.

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Rank: 3Rank: 3

Post time 2018-3-29 21:38:37 |Display all floors
Most people would rather see the TV version with English subtitles than the book in English. Ask those fans of US TV dramas in China, you know the answer because they do the same, who will read the book Six and the City when there is a film.

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Post time 2018-3-29 21:40:11 |Display all floors
Jin Yong never likes his name to be translated into Pinyin, the official translation is Louis Cha.

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Post time 2018-4-4 17:47:42 |Display all floors
I am interested in taking a dip into it, if the book is free. It is definitely a huge challenge to translate such a novel into English when it comes to the historical background, fancyful Chinese martial arts, etc. But I wouldn't buy it, because my book list is as long as arm. The type of the novel is not very my cup of tea.
I searched the relevant info from the Internet. It's said that "da gou bang fa" was translated as "branch beats white chimpanzee". I can imagine there would be a cultural shock if the translation is literally "dog-beating cudgel play" as I translate. The cudgel was a weapon for beggars to defend themselves from that potential physical provocative attacks from malevolent people and ferocious dogs they might had encountered in the street. It would be funny peculiar why the beggars would had beaten the innocent chimpanzees as the translated name is adopted.

I had thought it was impossible to seriously translate such a Chinese novel before until I read the English version of The Story to the Stone translated by Prof. David Hawke. He was a genuine sinologist in my view. There are copious complex Chinese words and poems he delicately intrepreted and presented to readers in English meanwhile kept the original favour as best as possible. For examples, the name of "jiao-xin" literally means "pretty apricot flower" which is homophonic "jiao-xin" for lucky the Chinese author alluded to. Mr. Hawke adopted "Lucky" as the English name for the maid. I am very impressed by his penitrating understanding on this classic Chinese novel of which many Chinese readers might not really be cognizant. His translation of the novel is certainly up to snuff.

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