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This is what happened to the men who found the Terracotta Army [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-2-4 05:31:38 |Display all floors
This post was edited by 1584austin at 2018-2-4 05:52

In a small village in China, seven farmers made a remarkable discovery that would change their lives, and the country, forever.

Homes demolished, unexpected suicide, early deaths - jobless and penniless; their find turned out to be far from a blessing.

It was March 1974 and China had closed itself off from the world. A group of farmers went out to some wasteland to dig for water, when they dug a little deeper and unearthed an ancient tomb and its 8,000-strong army.

From that moment on the lives of those seven men would never be the same, some have made parallels with the doomed fates of some excavator's of the Ancient Egyptian pyramids.


Of the seven men, four are alive today, and they are rarely credited with the most important archaeological find of the 20th century.


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Following the confirmation that it was in fact the entombed army of Qin Shi Huang, the archaeologists, experts, historians and the government moved in.

Their farmland was taken away and homes were demolished to make way for a museum complex, which the farmers and villagers received little compensation for, according to a BBC report.

Wang Puzhi became gravely ill with acute heart disease and in 1997 he waited until his family were out before hanging himself. His stepson believes his suicide was due to the burden he felt he was placing on his loved ones because of his health and their inability to afford medical care.

The absolute poverty felt by Wang Puzhi in the years that followed the finding of the Terracotta Army was also felt by Yang Zhifa's two brothers Yang Wenhai and Yang Yanxin, who were also struck down by ill health and died penniless in their 50s


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The four remaining brothers, now elderly, Yang Zhifa, Yang Quanyi, Yang Peiyan and Yang Xinman still struggle to survive after finding jobs at the museum signing books for tourists for £2 a day. Yang Zhifa told Swiss News in 2013 , then aged 75, that he retired from his work at the museum and little has been heard since.

Yang Quanyi spoke to the Mail on Sunday in 2007 and told them how the 'officials and businessmen' had made a lot of money, but not them

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He said: "We got nothing for the discovery.

"It was the days of collective farms and we were given ten credit points by our brigade leader for finding the warriors. That was the equivalent of about one yuan [5p].

"Families here are too poor to afford medicine.

"Yang Yanxin died of a skin disease that caused his body to rot away. Yang Wenhai died in great pain at home.

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he BBC reported that in 2007, Liu Xiquin, wife of Yang Quanyi, whose family home had been demolished, told the South China Morning Post, that her husband was afraid that he and his brothers “might have brought misfortune in some way, and does still wonder if maybe the soldiers should have been left beneath the ground


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China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors opens in Liverpool on Friday, February 9 and runs until October 28.

Tickets are £14.50 for adults and £5.50 for children aged between five and 17


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Post time 2018-2-4 07:46:20 |Display all floors
China seldom rewards its most deserving patriots.

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Post time 2018-2-4 16:34:10 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2018-2-4 07:46
China seldom rewards its most deserving patriots.

If the men had framed and authenticated their 1 yuan collectors would snap them up.

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Post time 2018-2-12 08:40:29 |Display all floors
Its a bit like the Welcome Back Kotter Curse isn't it. Or the Diff'rent Strokes Curse. What I don't understand is how did John Travolta escape the Welcome Back Kotter Curse. His son did die at 16 from a seizures I guess.

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Post time 2018-2-12 17:25:48 |Display all floors
Evelyn Einstein experienced poverty and homelessness all while the estate of her famous grandfather -- one of the most iconic figures of all time -- earned millions.

Albert Einstein's granddaughter complained publicly that the man she called "Granpa" had never left her -- or the other members of the family -- a dime.

Evelyn Einstein died at the age of 70 in her home in Albany, Calif. still fighting to get a piece of his estate...

Her brainy grandfather died in 1955, leaving 75,000 papers and other items to Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

All royalties go to the Israeli university for scholarships and research...

Doesn't matter how smart one can be, politics will get the upper hand of them...

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Post time 2018-2-12 19:36:21 |Display all floors
emanreus Post time: 2018-2-12 17:25
Evelyn Einstein experienced poverty and homelessness all while the estate of her famous grandfather ...




Albert Einstein had nothing to do with the terracotta warriors of China's first emperor. Do you think anyone can follow your mental long-distance flights? Try to stay on topic and do not reply if you have nothing to say that does matter in the ongoing discussion.

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Post time 2018-2-12 21:47:59 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2018-2-12 19:36
Albert Einstein had nothing to do with the terracotta warriors of China's first emperor. Do you ...

That's your opinion ol'chap, not mine

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