Author: Jackiyi

economy and animal rights [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-11-19 20:36:07 |Display all floors
UYA Post time: 2017-11-19 09:06
If the animal is dead for food.....
why not use its skin for leather?

yes, using animal products that has been slaughtered such as, the blood, the bones and any other use would be legitimate of course , logically. but the discussion I am trying to produce is on the ethical foundation behind it.
what animals are to be used, how are they to be used , and for what purpose are they to be used?
so the discussion is of decisions prior to slaughter.  and mainly. should there be one?  

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Post time 2017-11-20 02:06:47 |Display all floors
Jackiyi Post time: 2017-11-19 20:36
yes, using animal products that has been slaughtered such as, the blood, the bones and any other u ...


Death should be quick, not drawn out.

Think the decisions are made early.
If a chicken lives in a cage, that means its going to be eaten.
If it is raised for eggs, that is also decided early.

I for one living on a farm, might get attached to my animals.
Not sure how I would act when the time came to kill the animal.
I guess most cases, animal would be sold, and I would not see what happens next.

Many people become vegetarians, when shown slaughter houses or come aware of what they are truly eating.
I know a few, who came that way after seeing "Bambi".

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Post time 2017-11-20 22:54:41 |Display all floors
UYA Post time: 2017-11-20 02:06
Death should be quick, not drawn out.

Think the decisions are made early.

yes,  feeding the masses and eating is one thing, and using furr for wallets and bags and clothing is another.
I think the arguments about food are different then usage for accessories. so I would separate the issue.
if I was raising a chicken for eating, or if I would raise a rabbit or a fox and skin it alive for its skin I would think there is a difference in the meaning of these actions.

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Post time 2017-11-21 11:01:47 |Display all floors
Jackiyi Post time: 2017-11-20 22:54
yes,  feeding the masses and eating is one thing, and using furr for wallets and bags and clothing ...

There is a difference of skinning an animal for normal fur and skinning an animal for "class" fur.
Back in the day....
You kill the animal for food and maximize its use by skinning it for warmth.
To raise and animal just for its fur and discarding the rest is a waste and cruel.

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Post time 2017-11-21 19:19:40 |Display all floors
yes, those days are over. the need for furr is gone for a few reasons. it is not rational to produce furr at an industrial scale. and to do it for profit is unethical. especially when the profit is not large. causing this amount of suffering for something not substantial is twice ethically wrong.  we are not talking of killing animals but of mass production.
what does it mean cruel? it means causing suffering just for the sake of causing suffering.
the more appropriate term is indifference.
so lets try to get back on topic, does animals have rights.

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Post time 2017-11-23 05:45:59 |Display all floors
please allow me to mention something you wrote- "first you kill the animal"
you first kill the animal and make sure that it is dead. and only then you process it.
and why is that?

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Post time 2017-11-30 06:08:41 |Display all floors
us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. Many of us bought our beloved “pets” at pet shops, had guinea pigs, and kept beautiful birds in cages. We wore wool and silk, ate McDonald’s burgers, and fished. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?
In his book Animal Liberation, Peter Singer states that the basic principle of equality does not require equal or identical treatment. It requires equal consideration. This is an important distinction when talking about animal rights. People often ask whether animals should have rights, and quite simply, the answer is “Yes!” Animals surely deserve to live their lives free from suffering and exploitation. Jeremy Bentham, the founder of the reforming utilitarian school of moral philosophy, stated that when deciding on a being’s rights, “[T]he question is not, Can they reason ? nor, Can they talk ? but, Can they suffer?” Bentham points to the capacity for suffering as the vital characteristic that gives a being the right to equal consideration. The universal capacity for suffering is not just another particular characteristic, such as the capacity for language or higher mathematics. All animals have the ability to suffer in the same way that humans do. They feel pain, pleasure, fear, frustration, and loneliness. Whenever we consider doing something that would interfere with their needs, we are morally obligated to take them into account.
Supporters of animal rights believe that animals have an inherent worth—a value completely separate from their usefulness to humans. We believe that every creature with a will to live has a right to live free from pain and suffering. Animal rights is not just a philosophy—it is a social movement that challenges society’s traditional view that all nonhuman animals exist solely for human use. As PETA founder Ingrid E. Newkirk has said, “When it comes to pain, love, joy, loneliness, and fear, a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy. Each one values his or her life and fights the knife.”
Only prejudice allows us to deny others the rights that we expect to have for ourselves. Whether it’s based on race, gender, sexual orientation, or species, prejudice is morally unacceptable. If you wouldn’t eat a dog, why eat a pig? Dogs and pigs have the same capacity to feel pain, but it is prejudice based on species that allows us to think of one animal as a companion and the other as dinner.

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