Author: knox1234

Many foreign teachers in China don't have teaching certificates   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-8-23 11:00:39 |Display all floors


Another person in charge of teaching at a training school in Beijing expressed similar concerns. He said some foreign teachers speak with strong accents and some lack teaching skills.


Another coward not wanting to see his or her name published but get his or her biases across!

I guess it is a Chinese person with a strong CHINESE ACCENT when speaking Chinglish (not English, mind you). Don't we all have an accent? Only robots don't.

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Post time 2017-8-23 11:06:09 |Display all floors


Here, finally is something reasonable, although again stated by a coward who wants his or her own name only to be known on pay day:

person suggests that Chinese parents become less obsessed with foreign teachers and focus more on the learning abilities of their children. Some foreign teachers have high teaching skills, because they have passed rigorous hiring standards and attained teaching certificates, he also admitted.


Yes, Chinese parents should stop trusting Chinese training centres, schools and tutors as agents that can give their child English proficiency. No one in China can. The school system is too bent. Stop obsessing about English and enjoy life.

Foreign teachers waste their talents in China because the Chinese bureaucracy will thwart their efforts. Who is the boss of any foreign English teacher? It will inevitably be a Chinese principal. 99% of these principals are inadequate but powerful. They want a foreign face to grace their pictures, not foreign talents. To raise perfectly bilingual Chinese kids speaking English as well as native speakers would be a dishonor to Chinese officialdom. There is the small matter of national dignity...

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Post time 2017-8-23 11:40:47 |Display all floors
lots of  fake certificates swarm into the market,it's pretty hard to identify.let's say,not important to have qualified,more importantly,more experiences and the sheer ability to teaching.

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Post time 2017-8-23 13:48:53 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2017-8-23 11:00
Another coward not wanting to see his or her name published but get his or her biases across!

...

RE; Don't we all have an accent? Only robots don't. Only robots don't

Robots are programmed,
the programming programmer got a slang since she/he's human...
wouldn't you agree on that one!!!

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Post time 2017-8-23 15:25:18 |Display all floors
I'm not a teacher (and never have been), but even I know that China DOES have lot of unqualified foreign teachers. I don't find the claims made by OP untrue, but he/she only presents one side of the coin.

The other side is that many of the "schools" recruiting foreigners do not have licenses to recruit foreigners to begin with, regardless of the foreigners' qualifications. I know such setups personally.

Secondly, the problem of unqualified teachers is not limited to foreigners. Many, many, more Chinese act as teachers, especially in rural China, with nothing but high school degree.

Of course foreigners are easier to manage in this scenario - you can fine and deport them. Meanwhile, China would not gain much from reducing emplpyment opportunities of its own citizens, no matter how unqualified they are.

But that coin also has another side. And that is, that if a school is only able to catch unqualified English teacher, would it be better for the children to have an unquaified Chinese teacher teaching English, or unqualified native English speaker teaching English?

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Post time 2017-8-23 15:42:18 |Display all floors
emanreus Post time: 2017-8-23 13:48
RE; Don't we all have an accent? Only robots don't. Only robots don't

Robots are programmed,

I know. You are a robot and you have been programmed to respond to my posts or be unplugged.

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Post time 2017-8-23 15:55:29 |Display all floors
Jaaja Post time: 2017-8-23 15:25
I'm not a teacher (and never have been), but even I know that China DOES have lot of unqualified for ...
Secondly, the problem of unqualified teachers is not limited to foreigners. Many, many, more Chinese act as teachers, especially in rural China, with nothing but high school degree.


Frankly, I do not have the slightest clue as to how you can make any guess about the numbers of "unqualified English teachers".

In the not-so-distant past, many tertiary education institutions hired foreign nationals with a bachelor's or a master's degree as oral English teachers. These teachers did not have to be professional educators. I rubbed shoulders with lawyers for example who pitched in for a season as "oral English teachers". I do not see why they should have a teacher's degree because speaking practice is not such a professional activity. What is needed is a good hearing and a clear enunciation. Good people skills are an asset, of course. Still, those lawyers (or other professionals) were employed legally. Eventually a requirement was put into force maybe ten years ago: all F.T.s had to have a "Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages" (TESOL). Such certs could be obtained in short three-month courses.

But you also wrote:
Secondly, the problem of unqualified teachers is not limited to foreigners. Many, many, more Chinese act as teachers, especially in rural China, with nothing but high school degree.


I am not sure unqualified Chinese teachers make up a substantial percentage. In rural parts, yes, perhaps. In urban settings: no.
The question is: what does a Chinese qualification prove? It proves no more than that the holder has undergone a college course to become a teacher for the subject he or she is teaching.

When they enter the job market, the principals make the rules under which they perform their jobs. In general there is a clash of interests. The employer wants the new hireling to push as many pupils to achieve top grades as possible while the teacher may be motivated to look after the pupils themselves.

An enlightened approach to teaching cannot be developed under these circumstances. The bureaux of education monitor new teachers too and give them "advice", not all of which is useful. In the end, the most well-intentioned, enthusiastic Chinese English teacher gets demotivated and disappointed. In the end they do their job as a routine and regard the pupils as just some children in need of discipline.

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