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BHUTAN MUST DIS-INVITE INDIAN TROOPS FROM DONGLANG AND INVITE INDIAN DIPLOMATS [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-8-22 11:31:30 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2017-8-22 08:12
While it would be good if China could become a friendly and a good neighbor, it has acted thus far ...

The new trending news from SBS australia. Search for Sydney lecturer apologize for China map.

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Post time 2017-8-22 11:48:34 |Display all floors
This post was edited by emanreus at 2017-8-22 15:47

The initial British plan to open up Tibet involved constructing a road through Bhutan that would most likely have gone through the same location as the road now being built by the Chinese at Doklam, the site of the current stand-off. This would have been the shortest route leading to the main trading centre within Tibet at Phari. Bhutan saw the extension of roads as a slippery slope that could lead to annexation by the British and was not willing to concede. Despite repeated British inducements and threats,
Bhutan refused to join the club of Princely States and managed to remain independent.

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Post time 2017-8-22 12:48:49 |Display all floors
emanreus Post time: 2017-8-22 08:48
Tibet involved constructing a road through Bhutan that would most likely have gone through the same  ...

Tbet doesnt exist anymore. Tbet doesnt read a road there. None of the  populated regions are there nor its a trade route.

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Post time 2017-8-22 15:44:18 |Display all floors
The most important strategic dimension in the Himalayas is the vertical height from which force is projected on the opponent.  The side that dominates the heights, locally and generally, has the better positional advantage.  This is the dimension missing in the ancient game of Weiqi (Go), but well understood by the students of Sunzi and other military classics.  This height advantage can be overcome by the horizontal advantage of encirclement, but if both are combined, such a strategy becomes offensively indefensible, and defensively impermeable.  Height can be amplified by air or space power, as is the usual tactic in modern warfare.  

China's main forces are good at horizontal encirclement and defense, so it needs fresh blood from Tibetan volunteers to achieve access and mastery of what otherwise may be "unscalable heights" which the local Tibetans have adapted to and can overcome with reasonable ease.

Only a Chinese Tibetan Army can guarantee the defense of Donglang (Doklam) and the rest of the mountainous border between China and India.  And why not, if Donglang (Doklam) was originally a part of Tibet?

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Post time 2017-8-22 15:49:55 |Display all floors
manoj10 Post time: 2017-8-22 12:48
Tbet doesnt exist anymore. Tbet doesnt read a road there. None of the  populated regions are there ...

But BHUTAN needs the road...

The initial British plan to open up Tibet involved constructing a road through Bhutan that would most likely have gone through the same location as the road now being built by the Chinese at Doklam, the site of the current stand-off. This would have been the shortest route leading to the main trading centre within Tibet at Phari. Bhutan saw the extension of roads as a slippery slope that could lead to annexation by the British and was not willing to concede. Despite repeated British inducements and threats, Bhutan refused to join the club of Princely States and managed to remain independent.

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Post time 2017-8-22 15:52:07 |Display all floors
emanreus Post time: 2017-8-22 12:49
But BHUTAN needs the road...

The initial British plan to open up Tibet involved constructing a ro ...

There is no proof of that. Stop talking rubbish.

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Post time 2017-8-22 16:13:32 |Display all floors
manoj10 Post time: 2017-8-22 15:52
There is no proof of that. Stop talking rubbish.

Hmm,
Tsering Shakya is the Canadian Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society at the University of British Columbia, and author of The Dragon in the Land of Snows: A History of Modern Tibet Since 1947

Doklam then and now: from British to Chinese interests, follow the money

A stalemate in the Himalayas, a three-way territorial struggle, fears of foreign hegemony and dreams of a commercial invasion involving the centre of world manufacturing ... sound familiar?

By Tsering Shakya
19 Aug 2017

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