Author: ceciliazhang

14 Hong Kong dishes you should try [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:57:19 |Display all floors

8. Fish Balls 鱼丸(鱼蛋)

Fish balls are a typical Hong Kong snack, made of fish meat and can be divided into two varieties.
One is the well-known cooked food sold by street venders. Its history can be tracked back to the 1950s. This type of fish balls are made of fried fish meat. Food stalls often sell them with spicy or sweet sauces.
The other kind is sold uncooked and usually served as an important ingredient of hot pot, or cooked with noodles in hot soup. The price is higher and taste different from the first type. These are available in traditional markets and super markets.

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:58:19 |Display all floors

9. Fake Shark Fin Soup


In the past, a lot of hawkers used shark meat leftovers from restaurants as principle material of this snack. Nowadays, shark fin has been replaced by vermicelli as the main ingredient of this snack, hence the ‘Fake' added in front of the name.
Mushrooms, black fungus, pork, and some other ingredients are added as the soup boils. Several seasonings are provided to accompany the meat, typically pepper, Zhejiang vinegar and sesame oil.
Fake shark fin soup was widespread at Mosque Street in the 1980s. As one of the street snacks, Fake Shark Fin Soup used to be served in small bowls and sold by vendors along the streets; hence it obtained another name “Shark's Fin in Bowls".

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:59:52 |Display all floors

10. Rickshaw Noodles


The so-called Rickshaw Noodles are a kind of fast food, really good value for money, and popular with the Hong Kong people since the 1960's.
They are instant noodles with a variety of other ingredients such as hogskin, fish balls, sirloin, and carrots, with soup and sauces. Due to the variety of ingredients, they come in many flavors and the price range is wide.
In the past, vendors always sold this food in street corners from wooden carts, which is where Rickshaw Noodles obtained its name. Even today, Rickshaw Noodles is still very popular in Hong Kong, even though selling in street corners has become a thing of the past and modern shops have taken over.

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Post time 2017-8-4 10:00:47 |Display all floors

11. Eggplant with Minced Pork


Eggplant with minced pork is a Sichuan dish, but is widely served in Hong Kong restaurants. The eggplant is cut into slices and fried with cucumbers. Then minced pork is added and fried with broadbean paste and seasonings, such as red peppers, ginger, garlic, sugar, salt, and soy sauce.
The special feature is that everything is boiled in a clay pot for a while, making the strong flavor of the minced pork come out.

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Post time 2017-8-4 10:02:37 |Display all floors

12. Sago Mix

Sago Mix is a traditional dessert popular in Hong Kong. Its main ingredients are Sago (similar to tapioca) and a variety of seasonal fruits. The sweet and sour taste of fruits, combined with milky fragrance and chewiness of sago, makes Sago Mix a top choice in the summer.
Many places sell Sago Mix, but Xuliushan (a sweet shop), with a history over 40 years, is the best of all.

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Post time 2017-8-4 10:03:36 |Display all floors

13. Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea


Hong Kong-style milk tea is a popular part of many Hong Kong people's daily life, typically served as part of afternoon tea.
Hong Kong-style milk tea consists of Ceylon black tea, evaporated milk and sugar, the tea at the bottom and evaporated milk on top. Hong Kong people like to say that in a cup of superior milk tea the taste of milk should be stronger than the tea. Different ingredients and cooking methods produce various flavors.
By and large, milk tea is standard fare in Hong Kong-style Western restaurants and Cha Chaan Teng, as well as Hong Kong's historic Dai Pai Dong (a Hong Kong-style outside restaurant). Nowadays, Hong Kong-style milk tea has become a symbol of Hong Kong culture. In Hong Kong films actors frequently mention it in dialogues.
Lan Fong Yuen (a Hong Kong-style Cha Chaan Teng), situated in Central, is famous for its original Hong Kong-style milk tea and has a history of over 50 years.

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Post time 2017-8-4 10:04:29 |Display all floors

14. Pineapple Bread


Pineapple Bread is a sweet bread originating in Hong Kong, very popular, and found in nearly every bakery.
The surface of the bread looks like a pineapple, hence the name, but the traditional variety doesn't actually contain pineapple. A mixture of sugar, eggs, flour, and lard form a crisp surface with soft bread underneath, and it's best eaten when hot.

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