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14 Hong Kong dishes you should try [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:50:57 |Display all floors
1. Sweet and Sour Pork
Sweet and sour pork is probably the most famous Hong Kong food, which has made its way into Chinese take away menus around the world. The well-known pork ribs or tenderloin are eaten with delicious orange sauce.


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Post time 2017-8-4 09:52:01 |Display all floors

2. Wontons

Wontons are known as chāo shǒu (literally means "crossed hands"), added to a clear soup along with other ingredients, sometimes deep-fried. Several shapes are common, depending on the region and cooking methods.

The most famous are called Sichuan-style wontons, a celebrated snack in Chengdu. They are famous for their thin skin and rich meat filling as well as their soup, made of chicken, duck, and pork simmered for a long time.

The taste texture is very smooth and quite oily. A more Hong Kong style version would be cooked without peppers, and instead pieces of salted fish. It's extremely popular and much ordered in restaurants or dai pai dong (traditional licensed food stalls) together with rice.

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:53:01 |Display all floors
3. Roast Goose
Roast Goose is a traditional specialty of Cantonese cuisine: It is a whole goose roasted with secret ingredients, cut into small pieces, each piece with skin, meat and soft bone, and eaten with plum sauce.

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:53:52 |Display all floors
4. Wind Sand Chicken
This famous dish originated from Guangdong, and become well-loved by Hong Kong people. A whole chicken is flavored and put into the oven for about 20 minutes until the chicken’s skin turns brown.
What makes it so unique is that garlic pieces are added and it looks like wind-blown sand. The chicken is roasted and crispy on the outside and very smooth and tender inside. The smell of the garlic pieces is exactly to the right degree.

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Post time 2017-8-4 09:54:49 |Display all floors
5. Shrimp and Chicken Balls
Its Chinese name is 'dragon and phoenix balls'. Dragon refers to the shrimps, and phoenix refers to the chicken. The name is related to Chinese royalty: the emperor (dragon) and the queen (phoenix), and is usually served in Chinese wedding ceremonies.
Firstly, shrimp and chicken meat are chopped finely and kneaded into balls, then they are deep fried with bread crumbs. The balls are crispy and tender. Salad sauce is often used to provide a sweet and sour taste.


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6. Phoenix Talons (Chickens' Feet)
In Guangdong culture, people like using the word "phoenix" to represent chicken. The other reason probably is in Chinese pronunciation, phoenix (feng) sounds more beautiful to Chinese than chicken (ji).
The fried chicken feet are placed on a small plate, and placed into a bamboo steamer. After frying and steaming, chicken feet become very soft and you can easily chew the bones.
Consuming phoenix talons is good for skin and bone, because they contain much collagen and calcium. Women who are looking for better skin should eat more.


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Post time 2017-8-4 09:56:30 |Display all floors
7. Steamed Shrimp Dumplings (Har Gow)
Har Gow is one of the most representative dim sum dishes in Hong Kong restaurants. It remains a top priority of order, though expensive. Usually there are three to four shrimp dumplings in one bamboo steamer. Each shrimp dumpling has one to two small shrimps and a little pork wrapped in a thin translucent wrapper.
When it is served, the wrapper is crystal-like and shining, attracting people to put it into their mouths. One bite is enough to swallow one dumpling. The shrimp is refreshing and best if it has a little juice inside so that it is not too dry.


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