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robots are coming for middle-class jobs next [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-4-16 14:15:20 |Display all floors
This post was edited by Hinge at 2017-4-16 14:15

(smh)--

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From the factory floor to the supermarket, the call centre to the video store, it has happened to the working class already: waves of technological change that have rendered many of their jobs obsolete. But the next advances in automation won't just affect the low-skilled and low-paid. In the years ahead many middle-class professionals - engineers, accountants, journalists and insurance workers to name just a few - will find themselves replaced by computers, robots and artificial intelligence. Technological change can be liberating but it also breeds anxiety. And if it's not managed properly it could also worsen inequality by further skewing the power balance in the workplace and across society.

This is the central message of an upcoming book by federal Labor frontbencher Jim Chalmers and former NBN boss Mike Quigley: there is no such thing as "technological trickle-down". Without the right response, the economic gains achieved through increased productivity won't be shared.

A report by the University of Oxford last year found 57 per cent of jobs across the OECD were at risk of automation. Some of the world's finest thinkers have warned this will lead to significant political and societal upheaval, ushering in a new age of unemployment and uncertainty.

In Changing Jobs: The Fair Go in the New Machine Age - Dr Chalmers and Mr Quigley argue that, Australia is perilously ill-prepared for the changes to come. Schools, universities, workplaces, governments and, above all, individuals need to start changing now. The authors bill themselves as an "odd couple": Quigley is a technologist and baby boomer businessman from Sydney; Chalmers a Gen X economics boffin and rising star of the parliament from Logan.

But both are worried about how Australia will cope with the changes ahead.

They reject the "let it rip" crowd who cheer on technological change with no regard for wealth distribution or the transitional impact on real people. They put Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in this camp. Equally, they reject those - embodied by populist politicians like Donald Trump or, here at home, Pauline Hanson - who think it is possible to resist technological change or even turn the clock back to simpler times. Rather, the authors say we should embrace technology but ensure growth is inclusive, work is rewarded and there is a strong new social safety net to catch those left behind. That involves intervening to correct market failures, increasing investment in education and lifelong learning, and rethinking industrial relations.

Strong leadership will be essential to - in the words of Canadian thinker Michael Ignatieff - hold in check "the power of the barons enriched by the new technologies".Mr Quigley said.

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Post time 2017-4-17 03:56:18 |Display all floors
Did you write this yourself or did you plagiarise?

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Post time 2017-4-18 13:17:02 |Display all floors
dusty1 Post time: 2017-4-17 03:56
Did you write this yourself or did you plagiarise?

Didn't u c that "(smh)--"?      
Smile at whatever happens.
任它花开花落,一笑而过!

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Post time 2017-4-18 13:17:54 |Display all floors
This post was edited by Perfumecity at 2017-4-18 13:18

Well, guys, get ready 2 b jobless.      
Smile at whatever happens.
任它花开花落,一笑而过!

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Post time 2017-4-18 13:31:16 |Display all floors
Perfumecity Post time: 2017-4-18 13:17
Didn't u c that "(smh)--"?

That's not a reference that could be anything

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Post time 2017-4-18 13:31:48 |Display all floors
Perfumecity Post time: 2017-4-18 13:17
Well, guys, get ready 2 b jobless.

Lots of troops up your way according to the news

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Post time 2017-4-18 23:11:22 |Display all floors
A burger-flipping robot invasion is headed to the Bay Area. A few years ago, startup Momentum Machines unveiled a robot that could churn out 400 burgers an hour, and now, Tech Insider reports, the company is creating a restaurant concept around it.
A Craigslist job ad says the restaurant will open at 680 Folsom St. in the SoMa (South of Market) neighborhood; the ad doesn't specifically mention robots, instead reading, "This location will feature the world-premiere of our proprietary and remarkable new advances in technology that enable the automatic creation of impossibly delicious burgers at prices everyone can afford." The restaurant will still need to employ a human for tasks such as payroll and taking out the trash, however. (But wait — who will make the fries?)

As Tech Insider explains, the metallic burger maker is "fully autonomous, meaning the robot can slice toppings, grill a patty, and assemble and bag the burger without any help from humans." According to the Craigslist ad, the burgers served at the as-yet-unnamed restaurant "will be fresh-ground and grilled to order, served on toasted brioche, and accented by an infinitely personalizable variety of fresh produce, seasonings, and sauces."

As a tech capital of the world, SF is certainly no stranger to automation in restaurants: The wildly popular automat-style restaurant Eatsa cuts out all that pesky human interaction by taking orders for quinoa bowls via iPad, then delivering food to customers via cubbies.

Other restaurants, like KFC and Domino's Pizza, have proven that robots are adept at taking orders and even delivering pizzas, not to mention preparing bowls of ramen. A former McDonald's CEO warned that a robot takeover could be imminent as nationwide wage hikes make human labor more expensive. But as some robot restaurants in China recently discovered, automatons can't quite measure up to humans when it comes to tasks like serving food and pouring water.
Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured. Mark Twain

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