Author: linda_sun

Is the ban on paper money appropriate?   [Copy link] 中文

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Dracarys Post time: 2017-3-17 10:15
let them enjoy what tech would bring to them ...

Hope they know how to use them.

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seneca Post time: 2017-3-16 19:16
Bravo for a post well written. I hope it will seep into the Chinese collective mind.

I hope so too, but knowing how superstitious the Chinese are, I very much doubt they would discard their silly beliefs!  Burning paper money, houses, laptops etc etc should be banned immediately to prevent pollution, the choking fumes can kill the relatives, friends and members of the public, while not benefitting the dead!  It is a shame that people living in this modern day of high tech and science still believe in such silly things.

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sfphoto Post time: 2017-3-17 01:24
No but the industry should be professionalized and the practices standardized.
I am in favor of the ...

Sorry, got to disagree, buying paper money and burning them causes air pollution, which is already bad enough. Better to donate their real money to charity in the names of their deceased relatives!

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This post was edited by pnp at 2017-3-17 12:25
GhostBuster Post time: 2017-3-16 23:09
Every culture has its own practice to remember their deceased beloved ones.
No one has the rights ...

If that cultural practice is a public nuisance and a health problem through choking air pollution, then it should be changed for something that remembers the dead while being fair to the living, such as donating the real money that would be spent on paper money to charity, in the name of the deceased, benefitting the poor and the living!  That is a smarter way than burning paper money houses, etc, and environmemtally friendly too!  And btw, they don't just burn paper money at the graveyards on Qingming day, they also burn in the housing estates where they live, polluting the air we all breathe. What a public nuisance!  The sooner such silly practice is banned the better for all!

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pnp Post time: 2017-3-17 11:39
I hope so too, but knowing how superstitious the Chinese are, I very much doubt they would discard ...


I have been variously told that these habits disappeared in the 1970s. They have returned with a vengeance over the last twenty-odd years.

It amazes me how a people can be brought to abandon beliefs and customs and suddenly remember them when they are no longer kept under the obligation to not follow their old customs.

Along with the decadent burning of idolised consumer articles-in-effigy they also spend inordinate amounts on banquets during interments. Like at weddings, house-warming events, birthdays, the hosts receive envelopes containing real money. The only difference to wedding red envelopes is that these envelopes are white.

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GhostBuster Post time: 2017-3-16 23:09
Every culture has its own practice to remember their deceased beloved ones.
No one has the rights ...



Of course, some Chinese cultural features are here to stay, but should all stay, and should they stay as old-fashioned as they already were before the Revolution?

Cemetaries are real estate that is lost to agriculture, housing units, factories. They are oases of peace and quiet, and that is fine and as it should be. I have been to a number of Chinese cemetaries. They look uncannily similar to cemetaries in the West. The one outstanding difference is that Chinese cemetaries normally are outside built-up areas so as to keep the ghosts of the departed among fellow ghosts because the living are afraid of them. Western cemetaries are right inside towns and villages, usually next to churches. They are conveniently accessible on foot. A European cemetary gets visited seven days a week, as long as the deceased's family is around. The Chinese only visit cemetaries and burial sites on auspicious dates and on official dead-worshipping days. They are orphaned throughout the year. Let me suggest a change: if you really revere your ancestors, you will visit them more frequently, and you won't need a public holiday to do that. And if you don't need a public holiday you do not need to burn paper representations of cars, villas and even money. You can commune with the spirit of the dead in other ways too.

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Learn to RESPECT local cultural customs in China at least although we don't expect you to understand or even value them.

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