Author: pnp

Foreign Broadcasters Should Pronounce Chinese Names Correctly!   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2015-7-1 02:31:42 |Display all floors
Chinese broadcasters should pronounce non-Chinese names correctly.
It works both ways because of the sounds that are commonly used in each language.
For example there are some English sounds that Chinese people can only pronounce correctly after a lot of practice and then only slowly - think of the word 'usually': a difficult letter combination for an Asian speaker to pronounce.
Then add into the mix the fact that there is different pronunciation of names/place names in china depending on where you are from: regional/provincial pronunciation.
Additionally, not all broadcasters - in the UK for example - speak with an RP accent so they have different pronunciation/accents.

Finally, it is stupid to get all sensitive about how names are pronounced in different countries anyway - it makes someone come across as petty and childish.
In all honesty, who watches the news from another country and gets annoyed at how places/names are pronounced, as long as people know who/what is being spoken if?

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Post time 2015-7-1 06:57:17 |Display all floors
The BBC has, I believe, a department which instructs newsreaders on the correct pronunciation of any person's name or place they will mention in an upcoming broadcast.

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Post time 2015-7-1 08:28:43 |Display all floors
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Post time 2015-7-1 10:33:26 |Display all floors
It is disrespectful to address a person in a wrong tone. This is common in any culture. The fact that a news journalist from an official channel cannot put in the effort to even pronounce a name speaks poorly of him/her. If it was a layman on the street, understandable.... but a journalist on a broadcast... not acceptable.

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Post time 2015-7-1 10:35:47 |Display all floors
pnp Post time: 2015-6-30 18:44
Sorry, I stand by my explanation, especially the part about the Chinese name.



You stand by an inbcorrect interpretation as far as the WEST is concerned. The order of the names is nothing but a convention and has no such psychological implications as you hinted at.

It would be nice if Chinese learnt a little more about the names of others and learnt to respect other cultures. For example few Chinese bother to learn a non-Chinese person's name. Often you are referred to as the "waiguoren" or the "laowai"; also the Chinese tradition puts sometimes foreign last names last, and sometimes first. They transliterate names wrongly.

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Post time 2015-7-1 10:39:34 |Display all floors
Ratfink Post time: 2015-6-30 20:21
I do agree, however it's not just the reporters fault, often the studio anchors etc are clueless and ...



By a strange coincidence, most Aussies I have known in China can't or couldn't pronounce "Guangzhou" at all. The most common enunciation is "Gwangchoo".

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Post time 2015-7-1 10:45:20 |Display all floors
dusty1 Post time: 2015-6-30 18:24
The West have the reverse to Chinese the western way is Christian  names first and surnames last,  ...

That's not completely correct.

In the West names get listed in alphabetical order, and of course in such lists - think of the telephone directories! - the order of the names is surname, first name.

It takes a little more cultural awareness to deal with Western names than it does with Chinese ones, it seems: you need to realise under what circumstances you present yourself with your surname first and when with your first name first.

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