Author: voice_cd

Questions to ask English experts from Chinese learners (Round 18)   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-8-31 12:28:40 |Display all floors
This post was edited by werwolf at 2014-8-31 13:33

Q1:
Why do native speakers tend to add an "-ish" after certain word? For example, 'yes…ish", "Nice ...(USA)

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I have NEVER heard anyone say "yes...ish" or "nice...ish".
!  That doesn't even make sense.



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Post time 2014-8-31 12:30:08 |Display all floors
I think this thread got well answered! Bring on the next questions!

____________________

OK, I'm late to the party!

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Post time 2014-8-31 13:50:44 |Display all floors
robert237 Post time: 2014-8-26 11:09
Q1. ..ish means "sort of like" or "close to being".

As in, Let's meet at.. say sevenish". It means  ...

Or, "he seems kind of prudish" meaning he doesn't like to be touched by female security guards.

No, it's not possible. No right thinking man could ever resent being touched or patted down by a female security guard, especially by one of China's beauties.

Do you have any evidence to support your outrageous comment?

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Post time 2014-8-31 18:45:38 |Display all floors
Q1:
Why do native speakers tend to add an "-ish" after certain word? For example, 'yes…ish", "Nice…ish". Is "-y" also used in this way?
Agree with Robert. It means "about"

Q2:

In Chinese, we have a term ("缘分") to describe how two people are meant to meet, fall in love or become close to each other, like being driven by certain fate, or bound by some invisible power. Are there specific words in English to describe the same thing? (Is karma the word? What else?)

We would say the two people are soulmates. Also, "They were fated to fall in love."



Q3:

Why do the British love tea so much? I found it is frequently mentioned in the British TV play and novels. It feels like having a cuppa is some national trait. What's the difference between British and Chinese tea?

British usually drink black tea, while Chinese usually drink green or oolong. British are not shy about sweetening it and adding cream. Tea in Britain used to be gotten in trade for opium from China. After opium became illegal and China didn't need to trade for it any more, Britain sent a botanist (forgot his name at the moment) to go to China to "steal" the secrets of tea, so Britain could grow their own. They started in India, and to this day, some of the best black tea is grown there. (ex. Darjeeling) Black tea has about double the caffeine as green, and about half the caffeine of coffee, so it is a nice little boost. The caffeine buzz from black tea is noticeable, but without a harsh pick-up and drop off that coffee has, and it doesn't give bad breath, like coffee does either. I think it's wonderful. Since I met my wife, I've come to appreciate green and oolong teas a lot more, and I drink tha when I don't want to be up late.


Q4:

What does "you are a fine one to talk" mean? How do we use the idiom?

It is sarcastic. If I talked to someone and asked their advice, and they gave me some advice I thought was useless, I would say: "You're a fine one to talk to!" For example, if I were complaining to a friend that I could not seem to find the right woman, and he said: "You have bad taste." I might reply that way.



Q5:

Why are ships referred to as "she" in English?

As a way to show affection. He adores the ship as much as a great woman.



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Post time 2014-9-1 01:51:56 |Display all floors
This post was edited by werwolf at 2014-9-1 03:20

"It is sarcastic. If I talked to someone and asked their advice, and they gave me some advice I thought was useless, I would say: "You're a fine one to talk to!"  [YOU MUST LEAVE OFF THAT "TO"]  For example, if I were complaining to a friend that I could not seem to find the right woman, and he said: "You have bad taste." I might reply that way"

You could say it different ways.  As it is sarcastic, it could sound unfriendly, depending upon how it is used and the context.  Most common, and friendlier, would be, "Ha ha, look who's talking!"   I guess that the meaning is pretty similar to the phrase "do as I say, not as I do", that is the inference would be that the interlocutor is being hypocritical.

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Post time 2014-9-1 03:26:51 |Display all floors
Notice how I casually slip in fancy words like "interlocutor".  It makes me look smart.  Yuk yuk yuk!

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Post time 2014-9-1 06:12:14 |Display all floors
The strong, black teas introduced to Britain also have a hint of cardamom when near an Indian Chai source.English Breakfast is a popular choice, too. Orange Pekoe is the definition of what tea is, with all else beng interesting variations. Surprisingly, I have not yet found an orange pekoe supply in Beijing although have found English Breakfast and Earl Grey. Orange Pekoe is the coffee’s competitor, although it doesn’t compete against esspresso. Chinese teas while not yet known have a misleading reputation of being mild, thus Oolong tea can surprise new buyers. The comfort facter in the beverage is an important part of the choice. Exclusively in terms of comfort, orange pekoe is for many British people as beef noodles is for manyChinese people, as macaroni and cheese is for many Americans.

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