Author: changabula

Black Inventors [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-5-31 21:50:33 |Display all floors
Joey...actually, most of these inventors made these contributions "IN SPITE" of the system.
"Finch...stay away from that Ficus! That's a jizz-free Ficus."- Steve Stiffler

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Post time 2007-6-1 19:48:48 |Display all floors
M. A. Cherry

M. A. Cherry developed two devices that would one day evolve into very useful items for transportation. The first device was called a velocipede and consisted of a metal frame upon which were attached two or three wheels. Someone sitting on the seat of the apparatus could propel themselves forward at considerable speeds by moving their feet along the ground in a fast walking or running motion. Cherry's model, which he patented on May 8, 1888, greatly improved upon other similar devices and has evolved into what are now known as the bicycle and the tricycle.

Seven years later, Cherry set out to solve a problem with streetcars. Whenever the front of a streetcar accidentally collided with another object, the streetcar was severely damaged, often having to be totally replaced. Cherry patented the street car fender on January 1, 1895 and added safety for passengers and employees. The fender, which was a piece of metal attached to the front of the streetcar, acted as a shock absorber, thereby  diminishing the force of the impact in the event of an accident. This device has been modified through the years and is now used on most transportation devices.

  1. http://www.blackinventor.com/
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Post time 2007-6-1 20:21:46 |Display all floors
David Crosthwait

David Crosthwait was born in Nashville, Tennessee and moved to Kansas City, Missouri where he attended high school. He went on to attend Purdue University where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in 1913 and a Master of Engineering degree in 1920.

In 1913 Crosthwait moved to Marshalltown, Iowa where he began working for the Durham Company, designing heating installations. In 1925 he was named the director of the research department, overseeing a staff of engineers and chemists. His research concerned heating and ventilating and in the coming years he obtained 39 patents for various devices including heating systems, vacuum pumps, refrigeration methods and processes and temperature regulating devices. His most famous creation was the heating system for New York's famous Radio City Music Hall.

  1. http://www.blackinventor.com/
  2. http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blcrosthwait.htm
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[ Last edited by changabula at 2007-6-7 09:14 PM ]
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Post time 2007-6-1 20:23:16 |Display all floors
George Crum

George Crum was the head chef at the Cary Moon's Lake House in Lake Saratoga, New York when he set out to prepare the evening dinner for the guests. He intended to make french fries but sliced the potatoes too thinly. After deep frying them he found them very thin and very crisp. The hungry guest did not seem to mind and George began preparing the potatoes this way and they would soon become known as potato chips.

While George Crum's creation came about accidentally, the potato chip industry produces billions of dollars in sales each year.

  1. http://www.blackinventor.com/
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Post time 2007-6-1 20:25:25 |Display all floors
Mark Dean

Born in Jefferson City, Tennessee on March 2, 1957, Mark Dean found that success ran in his bloodlines. His grandfather was a high school principal and his father worked as a supervisor for the Tennessee Valley Authority Dam. A bright and energetic child, he often endured questions from grade school classmates, asking if he was really Black because Black people were not supposed to be that smart. Mark was an outstanding high school athlete as well as a straight A student. His success continued in college as he graduated at the top of his class with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1979.

In 1980, Dean was invited to join IBM as an engineer. Despite his new position, he continued his education and received a Master's Degree in Electrical Engineering from Florida Atlantic University in 1982. In his capacity as an engineer for IBM, he didn't take long to make a big impact, serving as the chief engineer for the team that developed the IBM PC/AT, the original home/office computer. Along with his colleague Dennis Moeller, he developed the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) systems bus, a component that allowed multiple peripheral devices such as a modems and printers to be connected to a PC, thus making the PC a practical and affordable component of the home or small business office. Dean would own three of the original nine patents that all PCs are based upon. Dean followed up with PS/2 Models 70 or 80, and the Color Graphics Adapter (which allowed for color display on the PC).

Mark Dean Despite his enormous success, Dean realized that there was more to learn and more than he could achieve, so he entered Stanford University and in 1992 received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. Five years later he was named as the director of the Austin Research Laboratory and director of Advanced Technology Development for the IBM Enterprise Server Group. Under his leadership, in 1999 his team made several significant breakthroughs including the testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor. With this great success he was named the vice president for Systems Research at IBM's Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, then as a vice president in IBM's Storage Technology Group, focused on the company's storage systems strategy and technology roadmap. He was later named vice president for hardware and systems architecture in IBM's Systems and Technology Group (STG) in Tucson, Arizona and finally the vice president of the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California.

In addition to the prestigious titles with their inherent responsibilities, Dr. Dean was named an IBM fellow, the highest technical honor awarded by the company (only 50 of IBM's 310,000 employees are IBM Fellows and he was the first Black person so honored). In 1997, along with his friend Dennis Moeller, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame (with Hall membership at around 150) and in 2001 was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineers. With more than 40 patents or patents pending, Dr. Dean is poised to continue his far reaching impact on the world of science and the home and workplace.

[ Last edited by changabula at 2007-6-1 08:30 PM ]
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Post time 2007-6-1 20:27:52 |Display all floors
Joseph Dickinson
(invented several improvements to different musical instruments.)

Joseph Dickinson was born in Canada in 1955 and moved to Michigan in 1870. He learned about various types of organs while working for the Clough and Warren Organ Company in Detroit in 1872. One of the organs he designed was awarded a prize at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1876 and Dickinson was quickly hired to build organs for major customers, including the Royal Family of Portugal.

After marrying Eva Gould in 1884, Dickinson formed the Dickinson-Gould Organ Company along with his father-in-law. The company manufactured reed organs and Dickinson received numerous patents for them, the last coming in 1912.

In particular, Joseph Dickinson invented an improvement to player pianos (patent below) that provided better actuation - the loudness or softness of the key strikes; and could play the sheet music from any point in the song.

  1. http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/bl_Joseph_Hunter_Dickinson.htm
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[ Last edited by changabula at 2007-6-7 09:21 PM ]
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Post time 2007-6-1 20:29:23 |Display all floors
P. B. Downing

In 1891, anyone interested in mailing a letter would have to make the long trip o the post office. P. B. Downing designed a metal box with four legs which he patented on October 27, 1891. He called his device a street letter box and it is the predecessor of today's mailbox.

One year earlier, Downing patented an electrical switch for railroads which allowed railroad workers to supply or shut off power to trains at appropriate times. Based on this design, innovators would later create electrical switches such as light switches used in the home.
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