Author: JohnV

[Others] Teaching in China – a Personal Message [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-9-7 08:10:21 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2017-9-6 23:10
I am sure that if thousands of teachers had been deported any time recently it would have been in  ...

it would be big news yes..
if you want something in life get off your backside, and do it yourself!! don't rely on others to do it for you

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Post time 2017-9-7 09:08:09 |Display all floors
This post was edited by JohnV at 2017-9-20 12:50

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Post time 2017-9-7 20:00:26 |Display all floors
This post was edited by parcher at 2017-9-7 20:14
JohnV Post time: 2017-9-7 09:08
@parcher

Yes, I’ve heard the Internet rumours that you can only stay in one school for five years  ...

I wonder how they get visas to stay here before getting caught? china only issues a one month L with the chance to renew it one time only. HK have now stopped issuing 3 month L visas, so where are these visas coming from?

if you want something in life get off your backside, and do it yourself!! don't rely on others to do it for you

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Post time 2017-9-7 20:08:18 |Display all floors
JohnV Post time: 2017-9-7 09:08
@parcher

Yes, I’ve heard the Internet rumours that you can only stay in one school for five years  ...



I suggest you nbot take your own favourable experience as a rule that everyone else follows. You said it was completely wrong to believe that there is a limit to the number of years someone can work for the same school. We have a highly reputable English teacher in this forum who goes by the name of Mike, who was asked to leave China for several months at the end of five years. He obliged and is back in China now and he writes here on occasion.

What is true for you in the province where you are based may not apply to me or to anyone else anywhere else. I already mentioned a U.S> American who had been kept by one college for ten years. Then, the P.S>B. refused to approve his contract for the eleventh.

The Chinese authorities do not always work hand in glove. There is stiff resistance towards some by others. An official chop from a Guangdong authority might not be recognized by authorities in Hunan. This is why if you quit and get hired in a new locale, you will have to undergo the medical exams again that you may have had just a year before.

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Post time 2017-9-7 20:22:22 |Display all floors
JohnV Post time: 2017-9-7 07:16
@Seneca

You haven’t cleared the room, they’re just rants



I thought I should mention unpaid volunteers because I have come to this thread thinking you were talking about altruism versus selfishness. My very first job did not pay my contribution for my retirement. I could not save any money even though I had free meals at the college.

As for the foreign teachers at Pyongyang's University of Science and Technology, this was a news I had read in the South China Morning Post. I have also known a training centre that used to host a Canadian retiree who persuaded many of his compatriots to put in a stint teaching in rural schools in Guangxi for free, and there were a few dozen who did.

I think this is an observation that you cannot deny: no Chinese would do such a thing but plenty of Westerners do.

Of course,  there are a hell of a lot of young guys who see TEFLing as a sort of partying and being paid for it. It is interesting to see what kinds of people get attracted to this job: a) very young (and possibly very immature), wanting to experience a foreign culture without getting in debt over it. B) Older guys (or sometimes women) who want to liven up their retiree's life. There are many, and they usually are a great asset to their employers.

It's also noteworthy that ca. 90% of all TEFLers are males.

By the way, if you want to broaden your horizon about TEFLers, I suggest you acquire a copy of "Rivertown" by Peter Kessler. He was a U.S. American who taught in Sichuan for two years and later became a correspondent. He married a Chiense woman, then went to Egypt. His "Rivertown" is autobiographical.

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Post time 2017-9-7 20:22:49 |Display all floors
JohnV Post time: 2017-9-7 07:16
@Seneca

You haven’t cleared the room, they’re just rants



I thought I should mention unpaid volunteers because I have come to this thread thinking you were talking about altruism versus selfishness. My very first job did not pay my contribution for my retirement. I could not save any money even though I had free meals at the college.

As for the foreign teachers at Pyongyang's University of Science and Technology, this was a news I had read in the South China Morning Post. I have also known a training centre that used to host a Canadian retiree who persuaded many of his compatriots to put in a stint teaching in rural schools in Guangxi for free, and there were a few dozen who did.

I think this is an observation that you cannot deny: no Chinese would do such a thing but plenty of Westerners do.

Of course,  there are a hell of a lot of young guys who see TEFLing as a sort of partying and being paid for it. It is interesting to see what kinds of people get attracted to this job: a) very young (and possibly very immature), wanting to experience a foreign culture without getting in debt over it. B) Older guys (or sometimes women) who want to liven up their retiree's life. There are many, and they usually are a great asset to their employers.

It's also noteworthy that ca. 90% of all TEFLers are males.

By the way, if you want to broaden your horizon about TEFLers, I suggest you acquire a copy of "Rivertown" by Peter Kessler. He was a U.S. American who taught in Sichuan for two years and later became a correspondent. He married a Chinese woman, then went to Egypt. His "Rivertown" is autobiographical.

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Post time 2017-9-8 07:01:11 |Display all floors
This post was edited by JohnV at 2017-9-20 12:51

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